Archive for parks and parkways

Parkway People Perfect Parks Proudly

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Living Well with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2017 by katrinafilm

photo and info from Robert Thompson

parks and parkways

click on the photo for a larger view

 

Whether you call it the “neutral ground” or the median strip, residents and visitors can agree Esplanade Avenue has lush greenery.

This hard working crew from Parks and Parkways keeps it that way!

Today, James and his crew were removing the oak leaf blanket which attempts to hide our roadway and choke our plantings.

These guys never seem to lack enthusiasm for the work and deserve our gratitude.  The truck in the background of the photo above is full of bags of debris they picked up today.

Please say “hello” and “thank you” on occasion, and recognize these workers and the pride they take in beautifying our public spaces.

***

New Orleans offers thousands of acres of green space for visitors and residents to enjoy, which includes parks, playgrounds, city squares, neutral grounds, and street trees. Parks and Parkways manages, maintains, develops, beautifies and preserves over 2,000 acres of New Orleans’ public green space, which includes 2 major parks, 200 smaller parks and squares, including Jackson SquareArmstrong Park/Congo Square, and Lafayette Square, New Orleans’ neutral grounds, the 18-hole Joseph M. Bartholomew Municipal Golf Course, located in Ponchartrain Park, and over 450,000 trees.

Virtually every neighborhood in New Orleans contains a park, square, or outdoor green space. These green spaces are largely regulated and maintained by two regulatory agencies, Parks and Parkways and the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission.

Three major exceptions are City Park external link, which is regulated by a unique state agency of the Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism operated by the non-profit City Park Improvement Association (CPIA), and Audubon Park external link and Woldenberg Park external link along the downtown riverfront, regulated by The Audubon Commission, which was established by State Act in 1914 to maintain and develop Audubon Park.

Click here to download a PDF of the Parks and Greenspaces by Jurisdiction Map.

For more information about Parks and Parkway and the great work they do for all of us, please visit the link below:
http://www.nola.gov/parks-and-parkways/

Everything is Coming Up Roses at Capdevielle

Posted in Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 7, 2017 by katrinafilm


 Robert Thompson has been on a mission.   The once neglected Capdevielle Place has received much love and attention from neighbors rallied by Robert.

 Today, roses and palms became the stars of Capdevielle Place in the round centerpiece of the pocket park.   Check out the photos and a statement from Robert Thompson  below:

“Things are coming together at Capdevielle Place.  A vision from the get-go, rehabbing of the bed in Capdevielle Park, seemed like an impossible dream. After many ideas, much  sweat equity, cooperation from a committed Parkways staff, a generous gift (more later on that), and some professional help, a major improvement was born.  Not everything we had  wished for may have happened yet, but the best decisions from the plants people in charge developed the current implementation with resources available.  I hope everyone agrees this  is a win!

Thanks are due so many and I intend to let all know who made this possible soon.

Their generosity and work made this happen, and now we City Beautifiers must keep up with watering and weeding this gift.”

Robert Thompson

Here are some photos:

Before Robert Thompson made Capdevielle Place his mission, it was looking tired and lonely

 

The centerpiece of Capdevielle Place received palms and roses

 

Workers arrived early to begin the transformation

 

Work began immediately after the crew arrived

 

Everything is coming up roses at Capdevielle Place

 

Today, Capdevielle Place is an inviting respite due to the vision of Robert Thompson and help from enthusiastic volunteers and supporters

 

Paul Capdevielle (1842-1922)

Paul Capdevielle, the forty-second Mayor was of French descent. He was born in New Orleans, January 15, 1842. His father, Augustin Capdevielle, was born in France, but settled in New Orleans in 1825, becoming a prominent merchant in the commission business and active in politics. It was from his father’s interest in politics that young Paul inherited his interest in governmental affairs. His mother, Virginia Bertrand, was born in New Orleans in 1816.

Paul Capdevielle was educated at the Jesuit’s College in New Orleans from which he was graduated in 1861. He served with credit in the War between the States, enlisting in the New Orleans Guard Regiment of Infantry, but in 1862 joined Boone’s Louisiana Artillery, and was wounded at Port Hudson.
After the close of the war he returned to civil life, taking up the first employment that offered itself, studied law in April 1868 was graduated from Louisiana State University. In 1892, he gave up law to accept the presidency of the Merchant’s Insurance Company. He served as its President for sixteen years, until it was liquidated and sold.

His political history began in 1877 when he was appointed to the School Board. Later he was a member of the Orleans Levee Board, a Commissioner of Prisons and Asylums and Chairman of the Finance Committee of the drainage commission. Mr. Capdevielle was an outstanding figure in Louisiana politics from the time of his election as Mayor of New Orleans in 1899. He was appointed auditor of Public Accounts in 1904, and re-elected three times, and held this office up to the time of his death. He survived the political storms attending the fall of the state administrations, the last in 1920, when Governor Parker was swept into office.

The Flower administration was a turning point in the history of New Orleans. It closed one epoch and opened another. With it began the period of commercial prosperity which extends into the present time.
Mayor Capdevielle’s administration was noted for two events, both inseparably connected with the beginning of New Orleans’ industrial development; the installation of the modern sewerage system and the organization of the Public Belt Railroad. The Board of Port Commissioners also began to function actively during this period.

City Park stands as a monument to his energy and civic spirit. The upbuilding of the park was his constant care, and he served continuously as President of the City Park Improvement Association for more than two decades, holding the office at the time of his death.

The new administration went into office May 9, 1900, at the beginning of the twentieth century when a wave of prosperity passed over the country and was felt in New Orleans. Mayor Capdevielle in his inaugural address spoke of the drainage system about to be constructed and stated if the city desired to have its own electric light plant it could do so without great additional cost by using the power house of the drainage system.

The contract to erect a modern jail, to be called the House of Detention, was awarded for $112,800 and the site of the old Marine Hospital, on Tulane Avenue and Broad Street, was selected.
The Clay statue, being in the way of safe operations of the street cars, was removed from Canal Street to the Lafayette Square on January 12, 1901. The consolidation of various street railways into one corporation under the name of the New Orleans Railways Company was an important factor of the years 1901-1902.

On May 1, 1901, New Orleans was honored by the visit of the President of the United States, William McKinley, accompanied by Mrs. McKinley and Secretaries John Hay, Charles Emory Smith, and E. A. Hitchcock. He was received in the Cabildo by the Governor of Louisiana, attended by his staff in full uniform. The bells of the Cathedral of St. Louis announced the arrival of the President and his cabinet, escorted by Mayor Paul Capdevielle, and a committee of distinguished citizens. As the cortege entered the Supreme Court Hall, Chairman Zacharie announced in a loud voice “The President,” and the assembly arose and remained standing while the Chief Justice conducted the President to a seat of honor at his right on the Supreme Court Bench. The Governor of Louisiana took a seat on the left of the Chief Justice, and the Mayor of New Orleans the one on the right of the President, the Justices occupying seats immediately in the rear of the bench. Chairman Zacharie then conducted the members of the cabinet and their wives to places on the left of the dais, where a seat, filled with roses, had been reserved for Mrs. William McKinley, who, at the last moment, was too ill to attend.

In 1873, Paul Capdevielle married in New Orleans, Miss Emma Larue, who died several years ago. Three sons and two daughters blessed this union; the sons are Christian, Auguste and Paul, Jr., and the daughters are the Misses Edith and Yvonne Capdevielle.

Paul Capdevielle was found dead at his home in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 13, 1922, following a long illness, at the age of eighty years and six months and is buried in St. Louis Cemetery No. 2. Besides his children, a sister, Mrs. Virginia Buddecke and five grandchildren also survived.

City Removes Dead Tree

Posted in HISTORY with tags , , , , on February 16, 2016 by katrinafilm
City takes action on dead tree at 3309 Grand Route Saint John.  February 15, 2016

City takes action on dead tree at 3309 Grand Route Saint John. February 15, 2016

On February 8, 2016, the dead tree at 3309 Grand Route Saint John once again relieved itself of branches.  This time one of the branches shattered the glass sunroof of the resident’s vehicle.

The City was contacted via 311 and the tree was removed on February 15, 2016.

Many thanks to 311, Anne MacDonald of Parks and Parkways, The Parks and Parkway crew, and Mary Cunningham in the District A office of the City Council for their quick action to resolve this hazardous situation.

********************************************************************************************

December 18, 2015

treedown2015dec18The tree in front of 3309 Grand Route Saint John has been dying for quite some time. Recently, small parts of the tree have been falling on cars parked under or near the tree. This morning, a large branch ended up in the street.

I called 311 and within 30 minutes, Chief Urban Forester Bob Richards with the City of New Orleansbobrichards-bw-2015dec18 drove up in a white City pickup truck. He hopped out, grabbed the chain saw he brought with him and within just a few minutes had the pieces of the large branch loaded up in the truck.

Bob said he’ll be sending in a work order for the rest of the tree since it is clearly dead and poses a hazard to citizens. Many thanks to 311 and Bob Richards for their quick action on this hazardous situation.

This situation drives home the importance of planting the correct tree between the sidewalk and the street.

Please consider the trees in the list below when considering a tree to plant between the sidewalk and the street:

PLANTTHIS

The most important consideration in planting trees and shrubs is the planting depth. Don’t plant too deep! Plant all trees and shrubs about one inch above the surface of the existing soil. No dirt should be placed on top of the existing roots and nursery soil so as to not smother the root system. Mulch well, leaving a two inch gap around the caliper(s) of the plant.For the most efficient use of water, construct an earthen berm two to three inches high around the drip zone area of the plant after planting. Water in well after planting!

PLANT IT LOW, IT WON’T GROW | PLANT IT HIGH, IT WON’T DIE

Want more information on what to plant between the sidewalk and the street?
Contact Parkway Partners at:
Phone: (504) 620-2224
Fax: (504) 620-2225
info@parkwaypartnersnola.org

The Department of Parks and Parkways maintains all City trees. These include trees on public property such as neutral grounds and in parks, and trees between the sidewalk and street.

Employees at the Department of Parks and Parkways perform an enormous number of tasks to maintain and upgrade public green spaces, and to re-green and beautify New Orleans. These include:

Tree Trimming, Planting & Removal
Permitting Work on Public Trees
Mowing, Edging, Weeding, Trimming and Planting on Neutral Grounds
Maintaining equipment and facilities in Parkways parks
Annual Tree Sale
Work closely with neighborhood groups and volunteer groups both local and from out of town

The Parkways team consists of licensed arborists, licensed horticulturalists, golf course professionals, licensed landscape architects, grounds keeping specialists and the hard-working arboreal and grounds maintenance teams.

City Takes Quick Action

Posted in Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 18, 2015 by katrinafilm

treedown2015dec18The tree in front of 3309 Grand Route Saint John has been dying for quite some time. Recently, small parts of the tree have been falling on cars parked under or near the tree. This morning, a large branch ended up in the street.

I called 311 and within 30 minutes, Chief Urban Forester Bob Richards with the City of New Orleansbobrichards-bw-2015dec18 drove up in a white City pickup truck. He hopped out, grabbed the chain saw he brought with him and within just a few minutes had the pieces of the large branch loaded up in the truck.

Bob said he’ll be sending in a work order for the rest of the tree since it is clearly dead and poses a hazard to citizens. Many thanks to 311 and Bob Richards for their quick action on this hazardous situation.

This situation drives home the importance of planting the correct tree between the sidewalk and the street.

Please consider the trees in the list below when considering a tree to plant between the sidewalk and the street:

PLANTTHIS

The most important consideration in planting trees and shrubs is the planting depth. Don’t plant too deep! Plant all trees and shrubs about one inch above the surface of the existing soil. No dirt should be placed on top of the existing roots and nursery soil so as to not smother the root system. Mulch well, leaving a two inch gap around the caliper(s) of the plant.For the most efficient use of water, construct an earthen berm two to three inches high around the drip zone area of the plant after planting. Water in well after planting!

PLANT IT LOW, IT WON’T GROW | PLANT IT HIGH, IT WON’T DIE

Want more information on what to plant between the sidewalk and the street?
Contact Parkway Partners at:
Phone: (504) 620-2224
Fax: (504) 620-2225
info@parkwaypartnersnola.org

The Department of Parks and Parkways maintains all City trees. These include trees on public property such as neutral grounds and in parks, and trees between the sidewalk and street.

Employees at the Department of Parks and Parkways perform an enormous number of tasks to maintain and upgrade public green spaces, and to re-green and beautify New Orleans. These include:

Tree Trimming, Planting & Removal
Permitting Work on Public Trees
Mowing, Edging, Weeding, Trimming and Planting on Neutral Grounds
Maintaining equipment and facilities in Parkways parks
Annual Tree Sale
Work closely with neighborhood groups and volunteer groups both local and from out of town

The Parkways team consists of licensed arborists, licensed horticulturalists, golf course professionals, licensed landscape architects, grounds keeping specialists and the hard-working arboreal and grounds maintenance teams.

***

I am extremely grateful to the representative at 311 and to Bob Richards at Parks and Parkways for their quick action on the dead tree at 3309 Grand Route Saint John that was clearly posing a hazard to citizens.

Charlie London
Content Strategist for…
http://fsjna.org | http://katrinafilm.com
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http://faubourgstjohn.net

City Removes Tree

Posted in Zoning Issues with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 16, 2013 by katrinafilm

tree-removed-2013july16

A neighbor in the 3200 block of Grand Route Saint John called the City of New Orleans about a dead tree in front of their home.

The tree was dead and full of bees. The City came out and determined that the tree needed to be removed. The Parks and Parkways Department will help with trees on City property. This tree was between the sidewalk and the street. The area between the sidewalk and the street belongs to the City of New Orleans.

The Department of Parks and Parkways encourages tree planting by citizens, but requires citizens to get a free Tree Planting Permit to plant a tree between the sidewalk and curb. Citizens also need to submit plans for the trees and/or shrubs they intend to plant on public property.

For full information and a permit application, see the Tree Planting Permit page from the City of New Orleans Permit & Licenses department. Depending on the location planting location, citizens may also need a Sidewalk Cut Permit.

If you need to contact the City of New Orleans please visit the link below:
http://fsjna.org/contact/federal-government-links/
stump1-3200grsj-2013july16stump-3200grsj-2013july16

Many thanks to the City workers
who did a great job!

entergy-3200grsj-2013july16

Entergy came out after the tree was removed
to make sure all the utilities were safe.

tree-removed-2013july16

City workers left the area clean.

Mary Cunningham Gets Things Done

Posted in More Great Posts! with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 18, 2012 by katrinafilm

Faubourg St. John neighbor Richard Angelico contacted Mary Cunningham who works in Councilmember Palmer’s office (District C) about a limb hit by an 18 wheeler on Grand Route St John, directly across the street from 3229 Grand Route Saint John. Mr. Angelico said the limb was dangling dangerously and mixed up in electric wires. Ms. Cunningham immediately took action. She contacted Parks and Parkways, Entergy and the N.O.P.D. to help.

Within minutes, yes I said minutes, vehicles from Entergy and Parks and Parkways arrived on the scene to remove the dangerous limb.

Many thanks to Ms. Cunningham for her quick action on this dangerous situation!

Give Ms. Cunningham a call at 504.658.1030 to let her know Faubourg St. John is truly grateful for wonderful folks like her!

PARKS and PARKWAYS

The Department of Parks and Parkways is responsible for the maintenance of city trees. These are the trees on public property such as neutral grounds, parks and those trees between the sidewalk and the street. The Department responds to requests for tree removal, tree trimming and stump removal. The Department places primary importance on the issues of public safety and prioritizes its work accordingly. Citizens have the option of hiring an arborist and paying to have work done to a city tree in front of their property. This work must be done by a Louisiana licensed and insured arborist and requires a written permit from the Department of Parks and Parkways. The arborist must obtain the free permit. A non-comprehensive list of qualified arborists is available. Stumps may be removed without a permit but should be done only by a licensed contractor with insurance to protect the homeowner in case of accidents. The Department of Public Works has determined that the repair of sidewalks is the respnsiblity of the adjacent property owner. You may contact them at (504) 658-8000. A sidewalk bridging detail, (download here), is available which will allow the citizen to repair the sidewalk while accommodating the roots of the tree and minimizing the need for future repairs. Contact us for more information, to report a city tree problem, or to request pruning or removal.

ENTERGY
Entergy is committed to maintaining its infrastructure in a manner that helps ensure the safety of its employees, customers, and community. Part of that commitment is trimming or removing trees that are too close to the power lines and may be likely to cause power outages or create a safety hazard.

Maintenance Needed at Desmare Playground

Posted in Featured with tags , , , , , on July 23, 2011 by katrinafilm

In addition to getting the entrance gate and swings fixed, neighbors discussed soil testing, repairing the old mural, fixing the padding in the play area plus finding a way to get the grass cut regularly in Desmare Playground. As you can see from the photos below, the grass is not now regularly cut at Desmare Playground.