Keeping Neighborhood Parks Beautiful

City Beautiful Club Friends:

Veteran volunteers and a new friend tackled the first step in recovering a lost pocket park at Bayou Road and N Dorgenois. A giant mulch pile courtesy of Park and Parkways personnel appeared and challenged the small but determined City Beautifer crew to spread it. Earlier, Phillip Mollere brought two truckloads of mulch and started the project.

Sally Gaden and Annie LaRock (with super-pup Fang) led the effort, cleaning gutters, picking up litter and spreading the mulch.

Passerby, and new member, Josh Lewis pitched in, lent a hand and taught us something about “microbial diversity”! (He teaches Ecology at Tulane!)

Much appreciated praise and approval came from onlookers Josh Barbee (Ursulines Triangle CBC Guy), Ben the welder, and Robert Tannen whose art piece occupies the other end of the park.

I think all agree the place is looking more like a park than a parking lot!

Thanks to all involved in getting this park back on track.

Robert Thompson
City Beautiful Clubs
www.facebook.com/CityBeautifulClubs

***

baltimoreThe city of Baltimore’s high crime rate inspired a gritty TV drama. But a new study (Tinyurl.com/TreeCrimeReport) by the University of Vermont’s Transportation Research Center, in Burlington, found that a 10 percent increase in trees in a given area led to a 12 percent decrease in crime. “It’s really pretty striking how strong this relationship is,” says Austin Troy, lead author of the study, published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning.

Researchers examined the correlation in and around Baltimore using aggregated crime data and combining it with high-resolution satellite images to conduct the analysis. The working hypothesis is that because people enjoy spending time in pleasant outdoor spaces, there are more observers present to hinder criminal activity. Also, a well-maintained landscape seems to send a message that someone may be watching.

To avoid culture bias, the study considered many socioeconomic factors, including housing, age, income and race of residents, as well as variables such as rural versus city setting and population density. The findings should prove helpful to urban planners.

NativeFringeTreeLousiana-500x333Fringetrees are excellent anywhere that a very small tree is needed, such as near a patio, in small yards, or under power lines. Like many white-flowered plants, they look especially nice planted in front of a dark backdrop. They can be used as individual specimens, in groups, in mixed shrub borders or in natural gardens. They are well suited to urban plantings due to pollution tolerance and adaptability to varied soils. Fringetrees are not salt tolerant.

Although fringetrees are adaptable and will grow in most soil types, they prefer moist, deep, well-drained, acidic soils. They grow well in full sun to partial shade. Leaf appearance is best in some shade, but flowering is heaviest in full sun. The ideal compromise would be sun through most of the day, but shade during hot afternoon hours. Fringetrees have low maintenance needs once established.

Due to a naturally strong branch structure fringetrees rarely need pruning. Pruning while young may be desirable if a single stem tree form is preferred. Fringetrees do not transplant well so take care to choose an appropriate permanent location and use proper planting methods. Plant it high, it won’t die!

Plant it Low, It Won’t Grow | Plant it High, It Won’t Die

The most important consideration in planting trees and shrubs is the planting depth. Don’t plant too deep!
Plant all trees and shrubs about one inch above the surface of the existing soil. No dirt should be placed on top of the existing roots and nursery soil so as to not smother the root system. Mulch well, leaving a two inch gap around the caliper(s) of the plant.

For the most efficient use of water, construct an earthen berm two to three inches high around the drip zone area of the plant after planting. Water in well after planting!

TREES TO PLANT IN NEW ORLEANS

choose-tree

Click here for the original article.

YOU TOO CAN BOOGALOO AS A VOLUNTEER

volunteersboogaloo

Help the Bayou Boogaloo to remain FREE

You too can Boogaloo as a volunteer

Bayou Boogaloo Volunteers! – http://www.thebayouboogaloo.com/info-directions/volunteer/

Are you interested in volunteering with The Bayou Boogaloo on the banks of beautiful Bayou St. John on May 20, 21, and 22?

You can visit the sign up page by visiting https://www.volunteerspot.com/login/entry/987188364026

If you are unable to volunteer this year but would like to join The Bayou Boogaloo’s
volunteer mailing list for future events, please, sign up on The Bayou Boogaloo’s website.

For any questions or concerns, please email
volunteers@mothershipfoundation.org

Interested in Volunteering with The Bayou Boogaloo?

See all of the 2016 volunteer opportunities and sign up for a spot here.

On top of becoming part of the Boogaloo Family and being one of the key players that help keep the festival free, Volunteers also receive a free t-shirt that is not available for sale to the public.

***

2016boogaloobanner4fsjna

Bodacious Boogaloo
by Charlie London

Since the beginning, the Bayou Boogaloo, held on the banks of Bayou St. John in New Orleans during May, has had a mission to give back to the community. The first Bayou Boogaloo in 2006 was a healing effort for the community. Many folks were still rebuilding their lives and their houses after “the storm”. The Bayou Boogaloo was a welcome respite from the daily grind. It provided much needed fun for both adults and children.

One of the often forgotten aspects of the Bayou Boogaloo is its emphasis on zero impact on the environment. I’ve personally witnessed the meticulous cleanup after the event. One would never know the music festival ever took place because the area is left as clean or cleaner than it was before the event.

The Bayou Boogaloo has promoted solar energy, recycling and encouraged folks to consider the environment. The Bayou Boogaloo has led by example. Several huge oak trees have been planted along the banks of Bayou St. John leaving a lasting positive impact on the environment and the community.

The Bayou Boogaloo gives back in other ways too! The event helps neighborhood organizations raise funds for their operations, has helped build playgrounds, has supported community sports initiatives, helped plant native habitat-building and erosion-preventing marsh grasses, and replaced trees lost during hurricanes.

The City even recognized the Bayou Boogaloo’s founder, Jared Zeller, with a proclamation for promoting an economically and environmentally sustainable event.

Join the Bayou Boogaloo this Friday, Saturday and Sunday May 20, 21, and 22. The Bayou Boogaloo is more than just a music festival, it’s a community building coalition!

More info at: http://thebayouboogaloo.com/

***
THE BEAT GOES ON AT THE BAYOU BOOGALOO
By Geraldine Wyckoff
Contributing Writer

It’s been less than three weeks since the last notes rang out at the Fair Grounds to close the 2016 edition of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Not far away, bands will strike up again at the 11th Annual Mid-City Bayou Boogaloo. The free event is presented from Friday, May 20 to Sunday, May 22, 2016 along the banks of Bayou St. John between Dumaine Street and N. Jefferson Davis Parkway. It features three main music stages at Dumaine Street, Orleans Avenue and Lafitte Street plus a Kids Stage that has both music and other activities to please the youngsters.

There are some excellent local and national headliners at the festival that didn’t perform at this year’s Jazz Fest including Nolatet (Sunday, 6 p.m.), The Lowrider Band (Saturday, 7:45 p.m.) and the Wailers (Friday, 7:45 p.m.).

Let’s start with Nolatet, a band of all-star jazz masters – drummer Johnny Vidacovich, bassist James Singleton, vibraphonist/percussionist Mike Dillon and pianist Brian Haas. This performance marks the first time many local people will have the opportunity to experience this group as they’ve only performed in New Orleans several times. Formed spontaneously in 2014 and quickly releasing its exciting debut album, Dogs (The Royal Potato Family) just this year, Nolatet has been out on tour promoting the CD and, according to Vidacovich, has been very well-received. “They liked it a lot – a lot more than I imagined,” he is quoted in OffBeat magazine. “I thought the music would be a little too orchestral. There’s a lot of things that we’re doing that are just out of the norm.”

“I can tell you what it sounds like to me sometimes when I’m involved with the music and my head is spinning,” he continued. “It reminds me of a circus and a Christmas tree with a lot of lights.”

Because pianist Haas, unlike the other members, doesn’t live in New Orleans, Nolatet is a get-it-while-you can band though all concerned express their hope and intent to do much more in the future.

Just an aside – it’s great to have Dillon, who absolutely floored the crowd at last year’s performance of his New Orleans Punk Rock Percussion Consortium – back at Bayou Boogaloo. Hopefully, the Consortium, an amazing collection of rhythm masters will return next year or be booked somewhere else soon.

The Lowrider Band, which partly due to the presence of one-time Crescent City resident, drummer Harold Brown, feels almost like its from New Orleans. It’s also got that funk and street band attitude that music lovers here can really relate to. The last time the Lowriders performed in New Orleans was in 2009 at a benefit for the Save Charity Hospital organization. Now that’s awhile ago…

The band is, of course, made up of original members of the group War, including Brown, the great harmonica player Lee Oskar, guitarist Howard Scott and bassist B.B. Dickerson, who, because of health issues will be unable to perform with his fellow Lowriders. Due to a court order, nobody in the group is allowed to mention their participation in War in any promotional material or advertisements. Fortunately, these talents have been able to retain their rights to their compositions and receive royalties.

“Here’s how we say it,” Brown explained. “We are the original composers of and performers on ‘Why Can’t We Be Friends?,’ ‘The Cisco Kid,’ ‘The World is a Ghetto,’ and ‘All Day Music.’ All our friends know the Lowriders. Everybody knows exactly who we are.”

“When we come to play in New Orleans it’s like playing at home in our living room,” Brown once proclaimed. “You can drop all of your big shot attitudes. In New Orleans they want to know about your soul – your spirit. I tell people when they come into the city, to turn off the radio and roll down the windows.”

The socially conscious messages of tunes like Bob Marley’s “One Love” are much needed in today’s world. The Wailers keep that warmth, the much-loved classic songs and laid-back reggae riddims alive. Bassist Aston “Family Man” Barrett is the only member of the touring band that performed and recorded with the group that backed the late, legendary Bob Marley who influenced the world with the magic of his music and his pen. Barrett was the heartbeat of the rock steady beat, the sound that could be felt to one’s core. Reggae by the Bayou seems so right.

Our local stars like bassist George Porter & the Runnin’ Pardners (Sunday, 4 p.m.), the Queen of New Orleans Soul, Irma Thomas (Saturday, 5 p.m.) and zydeco go-getter, accordionist/vocalist Dwayne Dopsie (Friday, 6:15 p.m.) also bolster the impressive schedule.

Parents might want to bring their children to the Kids Stage on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. where Daria Dzurik, the leader/steel pan player/vocalist of Daria & The Hip Drops fame will hold a percussion workshop. With her talent, lively personality and big smile, Dzurik has the qualities to educate and entertain the whole family. She and the Hip Drops certainly caught the crowd at this year’s French Quarter Festival.

On Friday, the music schedule is abbreviated and begins in the evening on two stages starting at 5 p.m. The Wailers, which hit the stage at 7:45 p.m. close it down. On Saturday and Sunday the music gets going at 11 a.m. Naturally there are food and beverage vendors aplenty and arts and crafts booths from one end of the fest to the other.

One of the beauties of the festival remains its wonderful setting and just being able to sit along Bayou St. John and relax.

This article originally published in the May 16, 2016 print edition of The Louisiana Weekly newspaper.

Opportunity to Have Fun

susan-roth-FSJ-daiquiri-booth-facebookThe Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association will once again be staffing the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo this year. Please consider volunteering for the short 3 hour shifts on Friday night May 15th, on Saturday, May 16th and on Sunday, May 17th.

All the net proceeds will go to helping to rebuild Desmare Playground.

Please lend a hand, its easy and fun. You are with at least 5 other neighbors and we have a great time.

If you are interested in volunteering, email Brenda at outreach@fsjna.org

Shifts are 11-2, 2 -5:30, 5:30 to 8:30

If you are unable to volunteer, please stop by the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo, say hello and buy a daiquiri!

Want to know more about the plans for Desmare Playground?

Check it out at: http://fsjna.org/desmare-playground-project/

boogaloo-bayoudaquiris
fsj-daiquiriboogaloodog2014may17

Opportunity to Have Fun

susan-roth-FSJ-daiquiri-booth-facebookThe Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association will once again be staffing the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo this year. Please consider volunteering for the short 3 hour shifts on Friday night May 15th, on Saturday, May 16th and on Sunday, May 17th.

All the net proceeds will go to helping to rebuild Desmare Playground.

Please lend a hand, its easy and fun. You are with at least 5 other neighbors and we have a great time.

If you are interested in volunteering, email Brenda at outreach@fsjna.org

Shifts are 11-2, 2 -5:30, 5:30 to 8:30

If you are unable to volunteer, please stop by the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo, say hello and buy a daiquiri!

Want to know more about the plans for Desmare Playground?

Check it out at: http://fsjna.org/desmare-playground-project/

boogaloo-bayoudaquiris
fsj-daiquiriboogaloodog2014may17

Grow Dat Farm Shares

farm-shares-2015

2015 Grow Dat Farm Shares

Become a Grow Dat Farm Share Member Today!

What are Grow Dat Farm Shares?
In its second year, the Grow Dat Farm Share program is an opportunity for customers to enjoy chemical-free, fresh produce while investing in our farm and youth leadership program. Farm Shares are a form of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), a way for the community to become “member-investors” who receive a weekly portion of the farm’s harvest during the growing season. For decades, CSAs have supported small-scale farmers and strengthened local food systems. Members experience the seasonal fluctuations of the farm’s produce, a process that teaches consumers more about the natural cycles of food production. Farms benefit by receiving upfront, steady income from members, minimizing some of the risks that come with small-scale farming. At Grow Dat, all Farm Share proceeds support our youth program, which nurtures the leadership skills of teenagers employed in the meaningful work of growing healthy food.

How Does It Work?
Farm Shares run for 20 weeks, from January 21 – June 20. Members are responsible for picking up their weekly produce box at our farm site in City Park on Wednesday evenings (4-6pm) or Saturday mornings (9am-12pm); members may choose pickup day while availability lasts. (Note: Farm Shares will be suspended during the two weeks of Mardi Gras, Feb 11 – 21 and resume Feb. 25). If you or a friend can’t pick-up your box for a given week, you have the option of donating that week’s share to Grow Dat youth and their families.

Your share will consist of a variety of vegetables and herbs sustainably grown on our farm and will change on a weekly basis. One box will generally supply a family of five for a week. Each week share members receive a box of produce that will regularly include what we like to call “the base of the box:” 1) a ¼ lb. bag of our signature salad mix, 2) a ¼ lb. bag of arugula, 3) one bunch of kale, 3) one bunch of chard OR collards (farmer’s choice based on availability) and 4) fresh herbs. In addition to the weekly “base,” you will receive seasonal herbs and vegetables including basil, beets, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, eggplant, beans, leek, mustards, green onions, hot peppers, potatoes, radishes, sugar snap peas, squash, cherry tomatoes, tat soi, turnips and zucchini and more!

Membership and Payment:
The cost of a 2015 Farm Share is $500 ($25 per box value). Shares and pickup-dates are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To learn more about becoming a member-investor in our farm, click below a more detailed description of pickup procedures, crop availability timeline, payment procedures and farmer/member commitments. Once you have thoroughly read through this information, you may register, pay, and become a member! We’re thrilled to share our harvest with you in 2015!

CLICK to Learn More and Purchase your Farm Share today!

grow-dat-harvest-pic

BAYOU PLANTING

bayourebirth1Come out, reconnect with nature, and complete notable tasks at the projects outlined below:  
  
Marsh grass planting at new Bayou St. John wetland Saturday, Nov. 16


WHEN: Saturday, November 16, 8am – 1pm
WHERE: The project site is on the west side of the mouth of the bayou at the lake, between the flood wall nd the Lakeshore Drive Bridge
WHAT: Lake Ponchartrain Basin Foundation will begin planting native marsh plants
WHY: Stabilize new land built up after dredging project.  For more infomation click here.

Vegetation Survey at Delacroix Preserve Saturday, Nov. 16

WHEN:  9am-2pm

WHERE:  700 Delacroix Rd.

WHAT:  Woodlands Conservancy requesting volunteers to survey vegetation at Delacroix Preserve

WHY:  To identify what is native, invastive and to determine where restoration efforts are needed.  For more information click here

City Park Native Plant Tour Saturday, Nov. 16
 
WHEN: 10am – 11am
WHERE: Parking lot on Friedrichs Ave. after turning left from Wisner
WHAT: Tour of the native plant gardens that surround the pedestrain trail
WHY: To tour City Park’s efforts at native landscaping and to identify Louisiana natives
To register: email info@bayourebirth.org There is a $5 dollar fee that can be paid here.
 Chalmette Battlefield Seed Collection Day Sunday, Nov. 17
WHEN:  4pm-5pm
WHERE: Chalmette Battlefield 8606 W St Bernard Hwy, Chalmette
WHAT: Collecting seeds from species surveyed in August
WHY: To plant seeds and build inventory for Bayou Natives, native plant nursery
To register please fill out volunteer form here 

SAVE THE DATE:  Land Trust for Louisiana Membership Drive Friday, Nov. 22

WHEN:  6-7:30PM

WHERE:  Galvez Restaurant downtown 914 N Peters St in atrium ballroom

WHAT:  Membership Drive

WHY:  To gain momentum and support for their land conservation organization that works with community partners to protect and preserve our state’s natural treasures, agricultural lands, coastal wetlands, and urban green spaces for present and future generations–forever

Thank you so much for staying tuned and we hope to see you at some of these events!

 

Sincerely,

 

The Team at Bayou Rebirth

BAYOU PLANTING NOVEMBER 9

bayourebirth1Come out, reconnect with nature, and complete notable tasks at the projects outlined below:  
  
Volunteer Opportunities:
Marsh grass planting at new Bayou St. John wetland Saturday, Nov. 9
WHEN: Saturday, November 9, 8am – 1pm
WHERE: The project site is on the west side of the mouth of the bayou at the lake, between the flood wall and the Lakeshore Drive Bridge
WHAT: Lake Ponchartrain Basin Foundation will begin planting native marsh plants
WHY: Stabilize new land built up after dredging project.  For more infomation click here.

 

Installation of Diversity Garden at Ben Franklin High School Saturday, Nov. 9
WHEN: 8am-11:30am, 11:30-3pm, Sat, Nov. 9
WHERE: Ben Franklin High School, 2001 Leon C. Simon Drive (at UNO), New Orleans
WHAT: Diversity (Native Plant) Garden organized by the school’s Green Society
WHY: Establish a demonstration garden at the school for storm water management and wildlife habitat

 

Couturie Forest Native Tree Tour Sunday, Nov. 10
WHEN: 5pm – 6pm   |  WHERE: Parking lot on Harrison Ave. west of rotary in City Park
WHAT: Tour of trails and lagoons highlighting native trees and wildlife habitat
WHY: To tour the city’s treasured forest and learn how to identify native (and non-native) trees
To register: email info@bayourebirth.org There is a $5 dollar fee that can be paid here.
Bayou Natives nursery
for the benefit of all nature’s creatures.
Vegetation Survey at Delacroix Preserve Saturday, Nov. 16
WHEN:  9am-2pm
WHERE:  700 Delacroix Rd.
WHAT:  Woodlands Conservancy requesting volunteers to survey vegetation at Delacroix Preserve
WHY:  To identify what is native, invastive and to determine where restoration efforts are needed.  For more information click here
City Park Native Plant Tour Saturday, Nov. 16 
WHEN: 10am – 11am
WHERE: Parking lot on Friedrichs Ave. after turning left from Wisner
WHAT: Tour of the native plant gardens that surround the pedestrain trail
WHY: To tour City Park’s efforts at native landscaping and to identify Louisiana natives
To register: email info@bayourebirth.org There is a $5 dollar fee that can be paid here.
 Chalmette Battlefield Seed Collection Day Sunday, Nov. 17
WHEN:  5pm-7pm
WHERE: Chalmette Battlefield 8606 W St Bernard Hwy, Chalmette
WHAT: Collecting seeds from species surveyed in August
WHY: To plant seeds and build inventory for Bayou Natives, native plant nursery
To register please fill out volunteer form here 

We hope to see you out in nature at these inspiring happenings around the city and in the wetlands!

 
Sincerely,
 
The Team at Bayou Rebirth

 

Design Competition for New License Plate

lcef-black

 

Louisiana Cultural Economy Foundation

 Cultural License Plate Contest!

Deadline 8/9/13

 

LCEF is calling all Louisiana artists to submit designs for our Cultural License Plate Contest!

A bill was signed into law by Governor Jindal in June 2013 to create a special license plate for the Louisiana Cultural Economy Foundation.  Representative Stephen Ortego co-authored the bill along with Senator Karen Carter Peterson and was instrumental in helping to get it passed.

“The cultural economy is the largest employing industry in Louisiana.  It was an honor to carry legislation to help the Louisiana Cultural Economy Foundation in its mission to help cultural entrepreneurs in Louisiana,” said Representative Ortego. Senator Peterson stated, “Protecting and promoting our cultural economy in Louisiana is key to our collective economic health. I’m proud to support the mission of the Louisiana Cultural Economy Foundation as they strive to preserve our unique heritage and the people that continue to carry the flame.” Sales of the new license plate will provide operating support for Louisiana Cultural Economy Foundation.

LCEF is calling all Louisiana artists to submit an original design that best expresses Louisiana’s unique culture to feature on the new license plate.  Whether the focus is art, music, food, architecture, or some combination, the design should speak to our state’s vibrant heritage and culture.

The Winner Will Receive:

  • $250 Cash Prize
  • Two complimentary Patron Tickets to LA Fête Louisiane November 2, 2013. ($300 value)
  • Public relations opportunities
  • Your artwork featured on a Louisiana license plate!

The deadline for submissions is Friday, August 9, 2013.

Please download & read the Cultural License Plate Rules and Guidelines first.

   Download: “LCEF-LOGO-BLACK.jpg” (183.5 KiB)

   Download: “LCEF-LOGO-GREEN.jpg” (400.9 KiB)

   Download: “Cultural License Plate Rules and Guidelines” (433.4 KiB)

   Download: “License Plate Specifications” (97.2 KiB)

 

Ready to submit your design?

Submit Art Entry Here

How do we love Louisiana? Let us count the ways:
1.The distinctive music.
2.The flavorful and innovative cuisine.
3.The amazing and emotional folk and fine arts.
4.The unique and beautiful blend of cultures and traditions.
5.Our southern hospitality.
6.How we write and tell our stories.
7.The beauty and abundance of our wildlife and terrain.
8.The inspiration of our architecture.
9.Our rich and complex history.

Visitors love Louisiana for its culture. And one out of every 12 Louisiana workers depends on our cultural industry for their economic livelihood.

Culture means business

Volunteer Opportunity

david-cahn

I am happy to report David Cahn (son of Richard and Vivian) has chosen to do 30 volunteer service hours for his neighborhood (for school).

We’ve started at the eyesores on Esplanade at the Crete bus stop and at Capdeville Park removing rain trees, yaupon runners etc. Today we removed 24 wheelbarrow loads of leaf compost from the bus stop and spread around the Oaks at Capdeville. We’ll be working at the Esplanade bridge and Fortier Park. If anyone has a teen that needs community service hours, We’re working 11-1(perfect teen schedule).

I would also like to thank Robert Thompson and Dean Burridge for their matching hours. We found a sidewalk and a street drain today!
Bobby

Bobby Wozniak
1322 North Lopez Street
New Orleans, LA 70119
Cell: 504.452.0386

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑