2017 Bastille Day in Faubourg St. John Celebrates Joie de Vivre

Join the fun in the 3100 block of Ponce de Leon for the Faubourg St. John Bastille Day block party in New Orleans on Saturday (July 15) from 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. The celebration will include food, music, children’s activities, and an art market. There will also be a contest for the best Marie Antoinette or Napoleon costume.

Many people will enjoy the Faubourg St. John Bastille Day block party in the 3100 block of Ponce de Leon in New Orleans on Saturday, July 15, 2017. The celebration will include food, music, children’s activities, and an art market.

On July 14, 1789 more than 8,000 men and women stormed a prison fortress in Paris known as the Bastille, demanding the release of the political prisoners being held there, plus the prison’s store of weapons. The storming of the Bastille was the spark that set off the French Revolution, an event that had a significant impact not only on France itself but its colonies and former colonies as well, including New Orleans.

Arising from the tumult and chaos of the French Revolution was a young, ambitious general named Napoleon Bonaparte. In order to help finance his wars in Europe Napoleon sold off his country’s largest North American colony in what became known as the Louisiana Purchase. With that 1803 transaction, New Orleans and the rest of Louisiana – plus a vast swath of land between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains – became part of the United States.

bastille-day-faubourg-st-johnBastille Day is commemorated in New Orleans on the closest Saturday preceding the 14th of July. The occasion is celebrated with a block party in the 3100 block of Ponce de Leon Street in the city’s historic Faubourg St. John neighborhood, adjacent to Esplanade Avenue. This quiet, residential section of the city was once the home of many families of French Creole aristocracy. Most of the historic houses they lived in are still visible and in use today.

The Faubourg St. John Bastille Day party on Saturday, July 15, 2017 features live music, food and drinks to toast the memorable occasion. This is a family-oriented event with fun things for the kids to do, including arts and crafts and games. All of the neighborhood’s stores and businesses actively participate.

article courtesy neworleansonline.com

A little garden in which to walk and immensity in which to dream

by Robert Thompson

On Saturday, November 19, 2016,  neighbors turned out in numbers to make the City Beautiful Club’s Capdevielle Green and Clean Day a real success. Litter pickup, leaf raking, weeding and trimming, and gutter clean outs were just some things done.

An impressive project managed and executed by neighbor Pushpa has also resulted in planting the next installment of the Esplanade liriope border. Another great achievement was the conversion of the center bed “crater” into a presentable mound ready for a spring planting. 10 yards of soil, bales of pine straw, and 20-30 garbage bags were among things used that were purchased with donated funds from neighbors. Beverages and snacks were in part provided by our new neighborhood restaurant on Gentilly Blvd, TOAST It was the people power that made the real magic.

About 25-30 people came by and helped or supported the action in some way.  My joy was that the collection of individuals included folks from all walks of life, all age groups, and all economic classes. It is important to note participation by staff and residents of our neighbors at Odyssey House.   Sharing a love of the public space as a commonality was especially uplifting.   NOLA Parks for All had a couple of board members down in the dirt with us as part of their support and encouragement of our grass root efforts.

I wish I could enumerate all and thank them here but I would miss some simply because I wasn’t organized enough to document who came and went. I have a few photos which tell the story better and urge you to check them out in the link below:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/CityBeautifulClubs/photos/?tab=album&album_id=934998696632213

On the horizon – can we reach a consensus on what the important center circle bed should be?
Can we convince Park and Parkways to let us do it?

Stay tuned…

Robert Thompson
2653 DeSoto

Here’s a shot of the flurry of activity from young and old as Pushpa harnesses the raw power of our volunteers!
Here’s a shot of the flurry of activity from young and old as Pushpa harnesses the raw power of our volunteers!

Rickie Lee Jones was working with other Faubourg St. John neighbors to help beautify the neighborhood on Saturday, November 19, 2016. In the video above, learn why she lives in New Orleans.
***

backhoe-city-capdevielle-2016oct18

On October 18, 2016, Capdevielle Park received attention from the crews at Parks & Parkways. Diseased trees were removed, others trimmed and thanks to a large backhoe, a large step toward rehabbing the center mound for new plantings took place.

mound-capdevielle-2016oct18All this support from the City means we need to double down on our commitment to restore the central circular bed in Capdevielle Park. On Saturday, November 19th, please bring shovels and rakes, gloves, and muscles so that we can clean up the soil and prepare this bed for greater things to come.

Friends,

Headed toward our second Capdevielle Place (or Park) improvement action. Your help in the past has qualified you to receive more begging appeals from me!
Lucky!
Seriously, I and others have appreciated the commitments you have made to improve our little neglected park at Crete and Esplanade. I think we are slowly making a difference and are on the way to a much improved public space, one we can proudly claim for our special community.
At the moment we only have a couple of hundred dollars collected. I would like to continue plantings on the periphery begun by Pushpa last meet. Additionally, we have a special gift from Tammany Baumgarten (http://www.baumgardens.com/) of a garden plan for the bed closest to N Broad. More dollars will mean more plants to execute these goals. Large donors seeking tax deduction should contact NOLA Parks For All (a 501c3 http://www.nolaparksforall.org/contact-us.html) who is partnering with us at this time to support citizen actions related to park improvements.
The bulk of the work however is good ole fashioned labor. Litter removal, gutter cleaning, trimming and weeding, bed preparations – all driven by personpower. I have stockpiled pine straw for bed dressing. So please distribute this information in the notice below to interested parties, and respond if you can think auxiliary activities, provide refreshments or have appropriate plant material to donate.
Hope to see you that Saturday, Nov 19 (10a-2p).
Thanks
Robert Thompson
2653 DeSoto
capdevielle19nov

***

Paul Capdevielle (1842-1922)


Paul Capdevielle, the forty-second Mayor was of French descent. He was born in New Orleans, January 15, 1842. His father, Augustin Capdevielle, was born in France, but settled in New Orleans in 1825, becoming a prominent merchant in the commission business and active in politics. It was from his father’s interest in politics that young Paul inherited his interest in governmental affairs. His mother, Virginia Bertrand, was born in New Orleans in 1816.Paul Capdevielle was educated at the Jesuit’s College in New Orleans from which he was graduated in 1861. He served with credit in the War between the States, enlisting in the New Orleans Guard Regiment of Infantry, but in 1862 joined Boone’s Louisiana Artillery, and was wounded at Port Hudson.

After the close of the war he returned to civil life, taking up the first employment that offered itself, studied law in April 1868 was graduated from Louisiana State University. In 1892, he gave up law to accept the presidency of the Merchant’s Insurance Company. He served as its President for sixteen years, until it was liquidated and sold.

His political history began in 1877 when he was appointed to the School Board. Later he was a member of the Orleans Levee Board, a Commissioner of Prisons and Asylums and Chairman of the Finance Committee of the drainage commission. Mr. Capdevielle was an outstanding figure in Louisiana politics from the time of his election as Mayor of New Orleans in 1899. He was appointed auditor of Public Accounts in 1904, and re-elected three times, and held this office up to the time of his death. He survived the political storms attending the fall of the state administrations, the last in 1920, when Governor Parker was swept into office.

The Flower administration was a turning point in the history of New Orleans. It closed one epoch and opened another. With it began the period of commercial prosperity which extends into the present time.

Mayor Capdevielle’s administration was noted for two events, both inseparably connected with the beginning of New Orleans’ industrial development; the installation of the modern sewerage system and the organization of the Public Belt Railroad. The Board of Port Commissioners also began to function actively during this period.

City Park stands as a monument to his energy and civic spirit. The upbuilding of the park was his constant care, and he served continuously as President of the City Park Improvement Association for more than two decades, holding the office at the time of his death.

The new administration went into office May 9, 1900, at the beginning of the twentieth century when a wave of prosperity passed over the country and was felt in New Orleans. Mayor Capdevielle in his inaugural address spoke of the drainage system about to be constructed and stated if the city desired to have its own electric light plant it could do so without great additional cost by using the power house of the drainage system.

The contract to erect a modern jail, to be called the House of Detention, was awarded for $112,800 and the site of the old Marine Hospital, on Tulane Avenue and Broad Street, was selected.

The Clay statue, being in the way of safe operations of the street cars, was removed from Canal Street to the Lafayette Square on January 12, 1901. The consolidation of various street railways into one corporation under the name of the New Orleans Railways Company was an important factor of the years 1901-1902.

On May 1, 1901, New Orleans was honored by the visit of the President of the United States, William McKinley, accompanied by Mrs. McKinley and Secretaries John Hay, Charles Emory Smith, and E. A. Hitchcock. He was received in the Cabildo by the Governor of Louisiana, attended by his staff in full uniform. The bells of the Cathedral of St. Louis announced the arrival of the President and his cabinet, escorted by Mayor Paul Capdevielle, and a committee of distinguished citizens. As the cortege entered the Supreme Court Hall, Chairman Zacharie announced in a loud voice “The President,” and the assembly arose and remained standing while the Chief Justice conducted the President to a seat of honor at his right on the Supreme Court Bench. The Governor of Louisiana took a seat on the left of the Chief Justice, and the Mayor of New Orleans the one on the right of the President, the Justices occupying seats immediately in the rear of the bench. Chairman Zacharie then conducted the members of the cabinet and their wives to places on the left of the dais, where a seat, filled with roses, had been reserved for Mrs. William McKinley, who, at the last moment, was too ill to attend.

In 1873, Paul Capdevielle married in New Orleans, Miss Emma Larue, who died several years ago. Three sons and two daughters blessed this union; the sons are Christian, Auguste and Paul, Jr., and the daughters are the Misses Edith and Yvonne Capdevielle.

Paul Capdevielle was found dead at his home in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 13, 1922.

November 19 at Capdevielle Park

by Robert Thompson

backhoe-city-capdevielle-2016oct18

Today, October 18, 2016, Capdevielle Park received attention from the crews at Parks & Parkways. Diseased trees were removed, others trimmed and thanks to a large backhoe, a large step toward rehabbing the center mound for new plantings took place.

mound-capdevielle-2016oct18Sadly, our palm was stricken with Texas Palm Decline, a infectious tree situation requiring its removal. Another tree was found to be infested with termites. The crew courteously responded to several neighbors who had concerns about the work. They also managed removal of a dangerous limb on a street tree at the request of a Bell Street resident. The crew also did some cleanup work in the area. The day didn’t end there as the crew returned to grind the stumps so those eyesores are gone.

All this support from the City means we need to double down on our commitment to restore the central circular bed in Capdevielle Park. On Saturday, November 19th, please bring shovels and rakes, gloves, and muscles so that we can clean up the soil and prepare this bed for greater things to come.

Friends,

Headed toward our second Capdevielle Place (or Park) improvement action. Your help in the past has qualified you to receive more begging appeals from me!
Lucky!
Seriously, I and others have appreciated the commitments you have made to improve our little neglected park at Crete and Esplanade. I think we are slowly making a difference and are on the way to a much improved public space, one we can proudly claim for our special community.
At the moment we only have a couple of hundred dollars collected. I would like to continue plantings on the periphery begun by Pushpa last meet. Additionally, we have a special gift from Tammany Baumgarten (http://www.baumgardens.com/) of a garden plan for the bed closest to N Broad. More dollars will mean more plants to execute these goals. Large donors seeking tax deduction should contact NOLA Parks For All (a 501c3 http://www.nolaparksforall.org/contact-us.html) who is partnering with us at this time to support citizen actions related to park improvements.
The bulk of the work however is good ole fashioned labor. Litter removal, gutter cleaning, trimming and weeding, bed preparations – all driven by personpower. I have stockpiled pine straw for bed dressing. So please distribute this information in the notice below to interested parties, and respond if you can think auxiliary activities, provide refreshments or have appropriate plant material to donate.
Hope to see you that Saturday, Nov 19 (10a-2p).
Thanks
Robert Thompson
2653 DeSoto
capdevielle19nov

***

Paul Capdevielle (1842-1922)


Paul Capdevielle, the forty-second Mayor was of French descent. He was born in New Orleans, January 15, 1842. His father, Augustin Capdevielle, was born in France, but settled in New Orleans in 1825, becoming a prominent merchant in the commission business and active in politics. It was from his father’s interest in politics that young Paul inherited his interest in governmental affairs. His mother, Virginia Bertrand, was born in New Orleans in 1816.Paul Capdevielle was educated at the Jesuit’s College in New Orleans from which he was graduated in 1861. He served with credit in the War between the States, enlisting in the New Orleans Guard Regiment of Infantry, but in 1862 joined Boone’s Louisiana Artillery, and was wounded at Port Hudson.

After the close of the war he returned to civil life, taking up the first employment that offered itself, studied law in April 1868 was graduated from Louisiana State University. In 1892, he gave up law to accept the presidency of the Merchant’s Insurance Company. He served as its President for sixteen years, until it was liquidated and sold.

His political history began in 1877 when he was appointed to the School Board. Later he was a member of the Orleans Levee Board, a Commissioner of Prisons and Asylums and Chairman of the Finance Committee of the drainage commission. Mr. Capdevielle was an outstanding figure in Louisiana politics from the time of his election as Mayor of New Orleans in 1899. He was appointed auditor of Public Accounts in 1904, and re-elected three times, and held this office up to the time of his death. He survived the political storms attending the fall of the state administrations, the last in 1920, when Governor Parker was swept into office.

The Flower administration was a turning point in the history of New Orleans. It closed one epoch and opened another. With it began the period of commercial prosperity which extends into the present time.

Mayor Capdevielle’s administration was noted for two events, both inseparably connected with the beginning of New Orleans’ industrial development; the installation of the modern sewerage system and the organization of the Public Belt Railroad. The Board of Port Commissioners also began to function actively during this period.

City Park stands as a monument to his energy and civic spirit. The upbuilding of the park was his constant care, and he served continuously as President of the City Park Improvement Association for more than two decades, holding the office at the time of his death.

The new administration went into office May 9, 1900, at the beginning of the twentieth century when a wave of prosperity passed over the country and was felt in New Orleans. Mayor Capdevielle in his inaugural address spoke of the drainage system about to be constructed and stated if the city desired to have its own electric light plant it could do so without great additional cost by using the power house of the drainage system.

The contract to erect a modern jail, to be called the House of Detention, was awarded for $112,800 and the site of the old Marine Hospital, on Tulane Avenue and Broad Street, was selected.

The Clay statue, being in the way of safe operations of the street cars, was removed from Canal Street to the Lafayette Square on January 12, 1901. The consolidation of various street railways into one corporation under the name of the New Orleans Railways Company was an important factor of the years 1901-1902.

On May 1, 1901, New Orleans was honored by the visit of the President of the United States, William McKinley, accompanied by Mrs. McKinley and Secretaries John Hay, Charles Emory Smith, and E. A. Hitchcock. He was received in the Cabildo by the Governor of Louisiana, attended by his staff in full uniform. The bells of the Cathedral of St. Louis announced the arrival of the President and his cabinet, escorted by Mayor Paul Capdevielle, and a committee of distinguished citizens. As the cortege entered the Supreme Court Hall, Chairman Zacharie announced in a loud voice “The President,” and the assembly arose and remained standing while the Chief Justice conducted the President to a seat of honor at his right on the Supreme Court Bench. The Governor of Louisiana took a seat on the left of the Chief Justice, and the Mayor of New Orleans the one on the right of the President, the Justices occupying seats immediately in the rear of the bench. Chairman Zacharie then conducted the members of the cabinet and their wives to places on the left of the dais, where a seat, filled with roses, had been reserved for Mrs. William McKinley, who, at the last moment, was too ill to attend.

In 1873, Paul Capdevielle married in New Orleans, Miss Emma Larue, who died several years ago. Three sons and two daughters blessed this union; the sons are Christian, Auguste and Paul, Jr., and the daughters are the Misses Edith and Yvonne Capdevielle.

Paul Capdevielle was found dead at his home in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 13, 1922.

50 TREES TO BE PLANTED IN MID-CITY

SUSTAINING OUR URBAN LANDSCAPE

Sustaining Our Urban Landscape will be planting 50 trees in Mid-City with their friends at Groundwork New Orleans and the Louisiana Chapter of the American Bar Association!

Please RSVP if you will be attending an info session on Tuesday, September 27th about reforesting Mid-City

1handtreesBoth sessions will take place at the Refresh Community Room at 300 N. Broad (where Whole Foods is located). The meeting is on the second floor so it’s easiest to park on the roof and enter through the rooftop entrance.  Follow the signs to Broad Community Connections.

Please contact Susannah Burley with any questions: 504 616 6888 or sburley@soulnola.org.

Please visit the link below to indicate which session you will attend:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeXEC1Vn2mwoPXaG9RbDtjBQPIUgLRroMl3XQnelZXRZUDk3A/viewform

SOUL is excited to announce its first tree planting project! In a partnership with its friends at Groundwork New Orleans and the Louisiana Chapter of the American Bar Association, we will plant 50 trees in Mid-City on November 5th  CLICK HERE to learn more and RSVP for an info session.


MISSION | Sustaining Our Urban Landscape, SOUL, is dedicated to driving a resilient and equitable New Orleans through improving its water and food systems.


WATER SYSTEMS | SOUL is dedicated to mitigating New Orleans’ stormwater problems through replanting our urban forest and implementing green infrastructure. Just as grey infrastructure, such as canals and bridges, only function well when implemented as a large scale system, green infrastructure, including trees, only works properly when executed as a large scale system.

In working toward this goal, SOUL is partnering closely with community based organizations in outfitting neighborhoods with urban forests and green infrastructure.

Stay tuned for updates! Exciting progress is in the works.


FOOD SYSTEMS | Improving our local food system means that more people will have access to fresh healthy food, more jobs will be created, and more urban greenspace will be populated by beautiful and productive urban farms.

50 TREES PLANTED IN MID-CITY

photos by Brenda London
susannahburley2016nov5

Susannah Burley orchestrated a collaborative effort that resulted in 50 trees being planted in Mid-City on November 5, 2016

Lots of enthusiastic volunteers planted trees along Dumaine Street in Faubourg St. John
Lots of enthusiastic volunteers planted trees along Dumaine Street in Faubourg St. John
Volunteers planting trees on Dumaine on November 5, 2016
Volunteers planting trees on Dumaine on November 5, 2016
Homeowner Brian Lebaron provides support as Charlie London plants trees in front of Brian's home on Dumaine
Homeowner Brian Lebaron provides support as Charlie London plants trees in front of Brian’s home on Dumaine

SOUL and partners planted 50 trees on November 5 thanks to the generosity of Parkway Bakery & Tavern and other local sponsors. Many volunteers came out to help plant trees from 9am-noon on Saturday, November 5.

More at:

http://www.soulnola.org/

Volunteers on Dumaine
Volunteers on Dumaine
Susannah Burley speaks to the many volunteers who met at Parkway Bakery and Tavern at 538 Hagan to plant 50 trees all over Mid-City
Susannah Burley speaks to the many volunteers who met at Parkway Bakery and Tavern at 538 Hagan to plant 50 trees all over Mid-City

If you are interested in contributing to our next Mid-City tree planting, please donate at https://soulnola.org.

Thanks to the Mid-City, Faubourg St. John and Parkview Neighborhood Associations for coming together to make this happen!

Warmest regards,

Susannah Burley, Founder & Director

SOUL | Sustaining Our Urban Landscape

504 616 6888

sburley@soulnola.org

***
Click here for the original article.

baltimoreThe city of Baltimore’s high crime rate inspired a gritty TV drama. But a new study (Tinyurl.com/TreeCrimeReport) by the University of Vermont’s Transportation Research Center, in Burlington, found that a 10 percent increase in trees in a given area led to a 12 percent decrease in crime. “It’s really pretty striking how strong this relationship is,” says Austin Troy, lead author of the study, published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning.

Researchers examined the correlation in and around Baltimore using aggregated crime data and combining it with high-resolution satellite images to conduct the analysis. The working hypothesis is that because people enjoy spending time in pleasant outdoor spaces, there are more observers present to hinder criminal activity. Also, a well-maintained landscape seems to send a message that someone may be watching.

To avoid culture bias, the study considered many socioeconomic factors, including housing, age, income and race of residents, as well as variables such as rural versus city setting and population density. The findings should prove helpful to urban planners.

NativeFringeTreeLousiana-500x333Fringetrees are excellent anywhere that a very small tree is needed, such as near a patio, in small yards, or under power lines. Like many white-flowered plants, they look especially nice planted in front of a dark backdrop. They can be used as individual specimens, in groups, in mixed shrub borders or in natural gardens. They are well suited to urban plantings due to pollution tolerance and adaptability to varied soils. Fringetrees are not salt tolerant.

Although fringetrees are adaptable and will grow in most soil types, they prefer moist, deep, well-drained, acidic soils. They grow well in full sun to partial shade. Leaf appearance is best in some shade, but flowering is heaviest in full sun. The ideal compromise would be sun through most of the day, but shade during hot afternoon hours. Fringetrees have low maintenance needs once established.

Due to a naturally strong branch structure fringetrees rarely need pruning. Pruning while young may be desirable if a single stem tree form is preferred. Fringetrees do not transplant well so take care to choose an appropriate permanent location and use proper planting methods. Plant it high, it won’t die!
Plant it Low, It Won’t Grow | Plant it High, It Won’t Die
The most important consideration in planting trees and shrubs is the planting depth. Don’t plant too deep!
Plant all trees and shrubs about one inch above the surface of the existing soil. No dirt should be placed on top of the existing roots and nursery soil so as to not smother the root system. Mulch well, leaving a two inch gap around the caliper(s) of the plant.

For the most efficient use of water, construct an earthen berm two to three inches high around the drip zone area of the plant after planting. Water in well after planting!
TREES TO PLANT IN NEW ORLEANS
choose-tree

***


MISSION | Sustaining Our Urban Landscape, SOUL, is dedicated to driving a resilient and equitable New Orleans through improving its water and food systems.


WATER SYSTEMS | SOUL is dedicated to mitigating New Orleans’ stormwater problems through replanting our urban forest and implementing green infrastructure. Just as grey infrastructure, such as canals and bridges, only function well when implemented as a large scale system, green infrastructure, including trees, only works properly when executed as a large scale system.

In working toward this goal, SOUL is partnering closely with community based organizations in outfitting neighborhoods with urban forests and green infrastructure.

Stay tuned for updates! Exciting progress is in the works.


FOOD SYSTEMS | Improving our local food system means that more people will have access to fresh healthy food, more jobs will be created, and more urban greenspace will be populated by beautiful and productive urban farms.

***

Juke, Jump, and Jive in City Park on October 5th

citypark5cot2016

Juke, Jump & Jive: A benefit for the St. Jude Community Center

Patron Party:  The Parkview Terrace at The Casino at City Park above Morning Call

6:00-7:00 PM

Entertainment by The Gumbo Trio

Individual ticket $150  Sponsor $1,000 for 8 persons

Main Event Concert: Pavilion of the Two Sisters

Doors open at 7:00 PM  Open Bar

Show starts at 7:30 PM

Deacon John & The Ivories & The Dixie Cups

Main Event Ticket $75

FOOT RACE AND FESTIVAL SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 24th

STREETS WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE FOOT RACE


streetsclosed2016sept24

Contributions go toward Steve Gleason’s participation in advanced and experimental technology, equipment and treatments.

gleasonfamilyThe purpose of the What you Give will Grow event is to raise awareness for ALS and to support the Gleason Family Trust. The Gleason Family Trust is set up to help offset the incremental costs of living with ALS.

Team Gleason is an organization driven to generate public awareness for Amyothrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), raise funding to empower those with ALS to live a rewarding life, and ultimately find a cure for ALS.
The Gleason Initiative Foundation – a 501c3 working to help others with ALS.

Gleason Family Trust – for those wanting to directly support Steve and his family
www.TeamGleason.org

Ticket & Registration Information

Race – 9:30 am 
5K Run (3.7 miles)

Entry Fees:
$37 – First 737 Race Registrants
$45 – 738+ Race Registrants through September 23rd
Registration is available at packet pick up locations for $45
$55 – Race Day Registration – September 24th – 7:30am – 9:00am (limited)
$20 – youth (15 & under)

Race entry includes limited edition Team Gleason T-shirt, one general admission ticket to Gleason Gras with post run refreshments.

FESTIVAL – Until 8 pm
General Admission Tickets:
$5 – in advance; $10 – at the gate

VIP Tickets: (Limited Tickets)
$250 – purchased by September 23rd; $300 – at the gate
$50 – Youth (15 & under)
Enjoy VIP at Gleason Gras – Open Premium Bar, Live and Silent Auction, Door Prize – Autographed Steve Gleason and Thomas Morstead Jerseys, Private Restrooms, VIP Gourmet Food by New Orleans’ Finest Restaurants and Much More!  VIP ticket includes race registration.

Saturday, September 24th

Team Gleason House at St. Margaret’s
3525 Bienville Street in Mid-City – New Orleans

9:30 AM – 3.7 MILE RACE – 5K Race

FESTIVAL TO FOLLOW
Live Music, Food & Fun for the Family in Mid-City

9:30am – Race Starts
10:30am – Bag of Donuts
12:00pm – John Michael
1:00pm – Alexis and Samurai
2:15pm – Paul Varisco and the Milestones
3:45pm – 610 Stompers
4:15 pm – Hot 8 Brass Band
5:55pm – Tre G with Supa Saint
6:30pm – Bonerama