Meeting Tuesday, September 6 at the Fair Grounds Black Gold Room

Tuesday, September 6 is the quarterly FSJNA general membership meeting at the Fairgrounds at 6:30 p.m.

Cookies and refreshments will be provided by Fair Grounds Racecourse and Slots at
1751 Gentilly Blvd. in New Orleans.

 

Guests/Current Topics:

guidry·District A Update – Councilmember Susan Guidry
September 7th has been declared to be Geaux Blue NOLA Day by the New Orleans City Council and encourages everyone who lives, works, and plays in New Orleans to wear blue all day, and to adorn their homes and businesses with the color blue to demonstrate our appreciation for our New Orleans Police Officers and their families. Details in the link:
http://fsjna.org/2016/08/geaux-blue-nola-day-september-7th/

ganthier1·NOPD Update – Commander Ganthier
Citizens may email specific quality of life concerns that require a response from law enforcement to  nopd1stdistrict@nola.gov  When sending an email, one should include the contact person’s name and phone number so that a district representative can reply.

scott1·Fairgrounds Patrol Update — Commander Scott
As part of the ordinance allowing the New Orleans Fair Grounds to expand their operations to allow for slot machines the Fair Grounds is required to fund enhanced NOPD patrols in areas surrounding their facility. The patrol consists of two patrol cars operating 24 hours per day 7 days a week. The officers in the cars will have mobile phones and can be contacted directly by residents in the patrol area at (504) 251-0276 or  (504) 251-0111.

     Details in the link:  http://fsjna.org/happy-birthday-grand-route/fairgrounds-patrol/

burley1·Sustaining Our Urban Landscape — Susannah Burley, Project Director
Sustaining Our Urban Landscape, SOUL, is dedicated to driving a resilient and equitable New Orleans through improving its water and food systems. Details in the link:  https://soulnola.org/programs/

vodanovich·800 N. Rendon (McDonogh 31) – Update on development plans, Adam Vodanovich
Demolition of one-story annex building to former school.   Details in the link:
http://onestopapp.nola.gov/Redirect.aspx?SearchString=16-19834-HDLC

felicelavergne·Front Yard Initiative — Felice Lavergne, Urban Conservancy
The Front Yard Initiative is an incentive program that reimburses eligible homeowners $2.50 per square foot of paving removed- up to 500 square feet- for a max of $1,250.  More in the link:
http://www.urbanconservancy.org/project/fyi/#resources

Black Gold Room at Fair Grounds Race Course and Slots

(Accommodates 90-200): Located in the Derby Building, adjacent to the Grandstand, the Black Gold Room is the perfect place for an afternoon of racing fun or for an evening for that special get together.  Guests can enjoy the excitement of live racing in their own private room, with features including a private balcony overlooking the track, conveniently located mutuel tellers, self-service terminals, television monitors and a fully staffed buffet and bar.

The Black Gold room at Fair Grounds Racecourse and Slots
The Black Gold room at Fair Grounds Racecourse and Slots

1751 Gentilly Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70119 (504) 944-5515

Faubourg St. John Discusses Short Term Rentals

Lisa Amoss writes, “This is a problem that is rapidly spiraling out of control. While, in our post-Katrina recovery and rebuilding mode, we haven’t been paying attention, our neighborhood (and many others) have been invaded by short-term rentals and they are drastically changing our character and culture. I am NOT talking about neighbors renting out rooms in the homes they occupy, nor about anyone occasionally renting out the entire home they occupy for Jazz Fest while they are out of town. I am talking about developers coming in and buying up multiple houses, then renting them out as a business venture. These are hotels in residential neighborhoods. They are creating parking and noise problems on our residential blocks, and they are helping to drive up housing prices so that young families cannot afford to buy homes here any more. Our neighborhood is becoming increasingly occupied by transients who have no vested interest in keeping this a vibrant, diverse and safe place to live. If your block has not yet experienced this, there are many in FSJ that have. And it’s changing faster than you can imagine. ”

Cynthia Scott writes, “The ‘hotel’ on my block has now graduated to an events rental venue. Last week, for 3 or 4 days running, the space was rented to someone from Tales of the Cocktail for a daily party from early afternoon to 7 pm each day, with a DJ blasting extremely loud hip hop and other music and a constant stream of people being ferried from the CBD to the location via Uber. A week or two earlier the space was rented for the day to a HUUUUUGE (to paraphrase a certain candidate) birthday party which drew people from all over the city, with cars racing up and down our one-way street and parking in people’s driveways. They departed by sundown, so neither of these rentals could be considered a “home rental” by any definition.

SHORT TERM RENTALS

brinkman_j_lgby Emile J. Brinkmann

intlunionI am submitting these comments in connection with the City Planning Commission’s reconsideration of the issue of Short-Term Rentals (STRs) in Orleans Parish, and the City Council’s directive that a proposed zoning ordinance be drafted. As a point of background, I am the retired Chief Economist of the Mortgage Bankers Association in Washington and spent years running a research group dedicated to housing and housing finance issues. I have appeared on all of the major network and cable news shows, and have been quoted in newspapers through the US and other countries. Even though I retired and moved back to New Orleans two years ago, I am still the US representative on the executive committee of the International Union of Housing Finance, a 100-year old organization dedicated to housing issues around the world.

strdestructionBased on my background, I cannot think of an action that would be more destructive to the fabric of our neighborhoods and the well-being of our homeowners than the legalization of STRs for the benefit of a few, thereby rewarding those who take advantage of a lack of enforcement to violate existing laws with impunity. In Part One of my comments, I will make three basic points about the negative economic effects on homeowners. In Part Two I will address comments that have been made to the effect that AirBNB, VRBO, and similar operations are like Uber and are merely part of the growth of the so-called sharing economy.

Part One
1) STRs fundamentally upset residential valuations by introducing unsustainable commercial valuations into residential neighborhoods.
We have already seen home prices in historically significant neighborhoods increase at rates far in excess of the local incomes needed to support those prices. A significant portion of those home price increases are due to ability of some of the properties to earn upwards of 20 percent to 25 percent return on investment through illegal renting. This is great news if you already own a home in one of these areas and will be selling soon. Because the Assessor’s Office has no way to separate out house sales for STR usage, this is great news if you are the city collecting residential property taxes based on values inflated by STR commercial use. It is bad news if you are trying to buy or rent in Mid-City, Treme, the Bywater, or other impacted neighborhoods in order to live in the city.

It is terrible news if you are a long-term resident with no intention of moving, but are now faced with an annual property bill driven up by the valuation effects of illegal renting.

The valuation and property tax problem will likely be exacerbated by the idea that the city can mitigate the negative impact of STRs by limiting the number allowed per block face. The owner of the first one on the block makes a killing, and the value of that property goes up. However, the other owners on the block not only have to deal with the disruptions caused by the STRs and the higher property taxes, they are precluded from selling at the higher STR-driven prices because no other STRs will be allowed on their block (assuming for the sake of argument that the city would actively enforce density limitations). Therefore, the idea that the negative impacts of STRs can somehow be ameliorated by reducing the permitted densities can actually make more people worse off from a valuation perspective.

Given the instability of this structure and the lack of equitable treatment in terms of valuation and who is allowed an STR and who is not, I do not believe density limits would survive legal or political challenges, and are therefore not a viable option to prohibition.

Crown Point neighborhood signsThe result is that if you are a New Orleans resident with no intention of selling and moving, you would not only face the prospect of having weekly fraternity parties next door, you get to pay higher property taxes for the privilege. The result is that if you are looking to buy, you risk over-paying and being underwater on your mortgage if something were to happen suddenly to impact negatively the STR business, as will be covered in the next point.

2) Short-term Rentals directly inject the business risk of tourism into residential neighborhoods.
keepneighborsHotel owners and operators are accustomed to the business risks associated with the travel and hospitality industry. These risks are reflected in their operational plans, capital investments, and equity and debt financing costs. They understand that in a recession, travel is disproportionately impacted as businesses cut back on discretionary travel as a first response. They learned in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks that terrorism can interrupt air travel, and that even when flights are restored, companies will impose travel restrictions on key personnel.

In New Orleans and other hurricane-impacted areas, they have learned that even the threat of a storm, with or without a mandatory evacuation, can cause their rooms to empty and disrupt operations for some time. (As a side note, would operators of STRs be required to maintain enforceable hurricane evacuation policies for their guests, or would responsibility for these visitors fall on the city?)

In contrast, the health of the hospitality industry has a more muted impact on the traditional residential housing market in New Orleans. Tourism is only one of the legs of the New Orleans economy, and there are other legs to support the New Orleans jobs market and home prices. STRs, however, directly inject the risk of the tourism market into every neighborhood of the city where they exist. Demand for houses and high prices exist when owners can earn high returns, but what happens in a downturn? What happens when tourism suddenly slows for one of any number of predictable and unpredictable reasons? What happens is what we have seen in other housing markets dominated by investors and speculators. At the first sign of a reversal, they sell with a vengeance, driving down prices and leaving the long-term residents suffering the consequences of rapidly falling prices and “For Sale” signs everywhere. If the properties are leveraged, they can sit for months and years as they work their way through the mortgage foreclosure (and probably bankruptcy) process, further depressing values.

Real estate speculation is a fact of life. Some people win and some people lose. When a strip mall goes bankrupt on Airline Highway, the negative consequences (other than to the property’s owners and lenders) are limited to having one more eyesore around town. When that speculation, however, is driven by STRs and is occurring in some of the city’s most important and historic residential neighborhoods, the negative consequences of a drop in tourism will go right to the hearts of these neighborhoods, and will be much more severe and widespread than any normal downturn.

3) Weekly bachelor parties are more than a nuisance. They represent a real loss of value for the neighbors.
Many of the comments presented to the CPC and the City Council on this issue have dealt with the horror stories of late night parties and the problems that occur when out-of-towners believe that they can freely extend the revels of Bourbon Street to the residential neighborhood where they have rented a house for the weekend. The problems go far beyond loss of sleep, frustration with the inability of an under-staffed NOPD to deal with noise issues, and the absence of a private right of action to move against the owners of the offending properties. They represent a real loss of value to anyone attempting to sell an impacted home to anyone other than an STR operator. (I do not know whether the failure to disclose a nearby nuisance STR in a real estate declaration has been tested in a Louisiana court, but I am fairly certain it would be actionable in other jurisdictions.)

The logical outcome is that once an STR opens on a block, the only informed sales that would not be negatively impacted by the existence of the STR would be those to another STR operator. As already noted, however, such a sale would be prohibited if density limitations were put in place as part of an attempt to make STRs politically palatable.

This points again to the utter fallacy of putting any faith in density limitations. The idea that the CPC and the City Council would not be inundated with requests for exceptions, and that many of those requests would be granted, simply ignores political reality. That assumes, of course that the many illegal operators of STRs would even apply for exemptions to the density limits. The reality is that the city has failed for years to deal with illegal STRs. Based on this history, it is reasonable to expect that any density limits would be ignored or gutted in a few years.

keepneighborhoodsIn conclusion, the adoption of a legal STR framework for residential neighborhoods, particularly for non-owner occupied structures, would have tremendous and largely irreversible negative impacts on the fundamental character of the city for years to come. Ignoring the quality of life issues, the economics alone will lead to a further hollowing out of the city’s full-time residents. Homeowners will see that the rational action is to sell. They would avoid both the higher property taxes and the risk of a speculative bubble bursting with downturn in the tourism industry.

Part Two
AirBNB is not like Uber
It has often been argued that AirBNB and similar operations are nothing more than Uber for houses, that they are simply one part of an irreversible movement toward a shared economy where technology brings together the buyers and sellers of various services. At their best, such arguments are facile and do not stand up to even a modest amount of economic scrutiny. At their worst, they are a bald-faced attempt to direct attention away from what is illegal activity by saying that it is no different from what everyone else is doing in other areas of the economy. In reality, the only similarity between Uber and AirBNB is that both rely heavily on computers and smart phones.

Uber is an example of what the Austrian-American economist Joseph Schumpeter described as “creative destruction”. The idea is that in a capitalist system, economic growth occurs when innovators put their money behind new ideas for goods and services. While the creative process is the key for creating new markets and new opportunities, it comes at the cost of destroying old products and services, and the capital invested in delivering those old goods and services.

A prime example is Blockbuster versus Netflix. Blockbuster invested huge sums in brick and mortar stores and an inventory of video tapes, and later DVDs, to fill the shelves in those stores. It had a large complement of employees to man the cash registers and stock those shelves. Along came Netflix with the idea that people could go to their computers, select what titles they wanted to see, and have the DVDs delivered a few days later by the postal carrier. Immediately successful, the service Netflix created began the destruction of the hundreds of millions of dollars Blockbuster had invested in its system. Later, when Netflix switched to streaming content, it effectively destroyed the capital Netflix itself had invested in DVDs and its mail order business.

In Uber’s case, it challenged the existing way of summoning a taxi, as well as introducing a model that matched supply and pricing to peak periods of demand. Uber was challenging the economic model of the taxi business, but, more importantly, it challenged the local regulatory framework for taxis that existed in each of the cities where it sought to operate. Its success has come in exposing and differentiating between those regulations that were necessary for the public’s protection and those regulations that merely existed to protect the status quo. After all, until Uber, the method of summoning a cab outside a hotel had not really changed since the 1800s. This is Schumpeter’s creative destruction process at work.

The key difference between Uber and AirBNB (and similar companies) is that there is nothing fundamentally illegal about the service Uber provides. Paying someone to take you in his or her car from Point A to Point B is not inherently illegal, provided appropriate licensing requirements are met. The only ones harmed by the Uber innovation are those invested in the old ways of doing business.

In contrast, AirBNB and similar services are providing technology platforms that offer services that are fundamentally illegal. The regulations of which AirBNB facilitates the violation are not there to protect capital invested in the hotel industry. Rather AirBNB is facilitating, for a profit, the violation of zoning laws that were enacted to protect individual homeowners from this type of commercial activity. If the only harm was to the established hotels and legal bed and breakfast establishments, it could be argued that AirBNB is just another example of Schumpeter’s creative destruction. However, the true harm and destruction is to the residents of the neighborhoods disrupted by the illegal short-term rentals. The residents of these neighborhoods do not have capital at risk in the hospitality industry like Marriott or Hilton. Rather the capital they have at risk is in homes that they trusted would be protected by zoning laws and the enforcement powers of the city government. It appears that trust was misplaced.

Therefore, AirBNB has nothing to do with Uber or Schumpeter’s growth through creative destruction, but is simply a case of making a fast buck at the expense of someone else by facilitating an illegal activity. The closest parallel to AirBNB is not Uber, but hiring prostitutes with Craig’s list.

Sincerely,
Emile J. BrinkmannNO-short-term-rentals

 

 

 

 

An open letter to the Tales of the Cocktail Community regarding the effects of Short Term Rentals in New Orleans

Dear friends,

This open letter is not about AirBnB as such, but about the challenge of supporting your industry and community amidst new paradigms of travel and tourism. When Tales of the Cocktail was founded, we deliberately placed the event in July, one of the most difficult months for our local economy, in an effort to help increase revenue for New Orleans’ many hospitality businesses and employees. The hotels, bars, restaurants and thousands of hospitality workers they employ have been grateful for Tales of the Cocktail, and we want to continue to do right by them. In this spirit, we write to you today to help raise awareness about the effect short term rentals, such as AirBnB, are having on residents, business owners, and event producers, like ourselves.

Bar manager at Erin Rose, and former CAP, Rhiannon Enlil was given a notice of eviction last week, after four years in her apartment because her landlord wants to list the property on AirBnB. This is by no means an isolated incident. There are now over 4,316 AirBnBs operating in New Orleans.

“There are a finite number of homes in this city, and the demand is high for workers and residents who keep the economic engine running. If you allow short-term rentals to eat away at that supply, the appeal to live and work in this city diminishes. All of the visitors who use short-term rentals, who want to eat in our restaurants, listen to our live music, drink in our bars… who will serve them if we in the service and entertainment industry cannot afford to live here?”

Rhiannon Enlil
Erin Rose
Newly evicted tenant

This issue is also having a significant impact on the hotels and licenses B&B’s in New Orleans. Hotels are one of the longest standing harbingers of hospitality. They employ hundreds to thousands of people, provide insight and infrastructure to guests, and work with event organizers to facilitate events that would otherwise not be possible, such as Tales of the Cocktail. Every tasting room and seminar we facilitate is done so in a hotel, and it’s hard to imagine where else we could possibly produce so many events within one week. Because of our longstanding relationships with these hotels, we’re able to negotiate special rates for Tales attendees year after year. Hotels are experienced in the practice of hospitality, and legally qualified to accommodate our guests, whereas short term rentals, which are illegal in New Orleans, fundamentally upset residential valuations by introducing unsustainable commercial valuations into residential neighborhoods.

In this spirit, we encourage you to stay with one of our partnering hotels (or even another local hotel if you prefer), but please avoid staying at an AirBnB or other short term rental property that is not legally sanctioned to operate in New Orleans. Each short term rental takes revenue away from our own hospitality industry; if the hotels are operating below projected capacity, staff hours get cut, and employees get laid off. Tales of the Cocktail is one of many organizations in New Orleans working to have these illegal rentals addressed by our city government, but in the meantime, we encourage you to consider the matter for yourself. Everyone wants the best deal they can find, but sometimes the best deal results in an exceptionally rotten deal for everyone else. We employ you: help us keep locals in their homes and guests visiting our city in the many beautiful and hospitable hotels and B&Bs New Orleans has to offer. Thank you for your time and consideration. If you support this effort, please share this post.

Respectfully,

Tales of the Cocktail

Thank you to our partnering hotels: Hotel Monteleone, Royal Sonesta Hotel New Orleans, Ace Hotel New Orleans, AC Hotel New Orleans Bourbon, Bienville House, Bourbon Orleans Hotel, Dauphine Orleans Hotel, Hotel Le Marais, Hotel Mazarin, MOXY NOLA, Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, The Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans, W New Orleans – French Quarter.

TODAY, Tuesday, June 14, at 1:30 p.m., the City Planning Commission will propose a CZO amendment to allow all categories of short-term rentals, and make short-term rentals permitted and conditional uses in all neighborhoods. The CPC Staff Preliminary Report makes these and other recommendations, and has little information on enforcement mechanisms to control and penalize illegal operators.
For information on today’s meeting and a link to the Preliminary Staff Report, please use the link, below – short-term rentals appear as agenda item 9.
Call the CPC at (504) 658-7033 before you go to make sure the vote will take place today and that there will be time for public input.
If you are able, please attend the 1:30 p.m. today, Tuesday, June 14 CPC meeting in City Council Chambers to voice your opinion. Thank you.

Preliminary Staff Report

Faubourg St. John to FEED THE FIRST During Mardi Gras


Faubourg St. John will again “FEED THE FIRST” during Mardi Gras weekend.  Our First District Officers work 12 hour shifts during this time and are very appreciative of the fresh breakfast and lunches we provide.

If you’re available to help FEED THE FIRST, please write to info@fsjna.org

Can’t donate your time?

Faubourg St. John is a 501c3 non-profit
Donations are tax deductible

Donations are always welcome in any amount.
Please mail checks made out to the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association to:

Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association
P.O. Box 19101
New Orleans, LA 70179

Thank you!

photos below by Charlie London

The officers of NOPD’s 1st District are very grateful for the support from neighborhood organizations and the Deutsches Haus

Heartfelt thanks to all those who donate each year
FEED THE FIRST is not possible without your support!

Linda Landesberg, Brenda London, Charlotte Pipes, Ronnie Brink, Bonnie Lee, Mona McMahon, Diane Angelico, Charlie London along with Joe & Doranel Stephany and  Deutsches Haus  have worked hard this year to make the annual Feed the First program work!   Your support is much appreciated.
 

 

article below by Alicia Serrano of the Mid-City Messenger

Feed-the-1st-banner

The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is hosting its annual “Feed the First” event this Mardi Gras weekend.

Faubourg St. John provides a hot breakfast and lunch to the First District NOPD officers working during the Mardi Gras weekend, with shifts that can last up to 12 hours.

“You can’t believe how satisfying it is to see these poor officers come in from their shifts and we feed them and everybody’s in a much better mood,” Linda Landesberg, head of Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association events, said at last month’s meeting.

According to Landesberg, the association will provide breakfast and lunch for about 80 officers for four days at the First District station. Bagged lunches are also provided for officers along the parade route as well.

“There is a group of us that go and we actually bring a hot breakfast and serve our First District NOPD on Saturday, Sunday and Tuesday and we also do two hot lunches for them on Saturday afternoon and on Monday afternoon,” Landesberg said.

This year, Faubourg St. John will partner with Deutches Haus, Parkway Bakery, Terrenova’s and The Ruby Slipper for breakfast and lunch food items.

Landesberg said the event normally costs the association about $1500 to get, prepare and serve the food. At the meeting, she described the hard work that goes into making the officers’ healthy breakfasts and snacks, with association members starting preparation at 4 a.m.

“We have a great time doing it, but we’re pretty exhausted afterwards,” she said. “It’s a really nice community event and the officers are happy.”

To read about one of the previous Feed the First events click here and to donate or find out how to volunteer for the event email info@fsjna.org.

Faubourg St. John FEEDS THE FIRST During Mardi Gras

FeedFirst2016officers

 

Hans Ganthier, the new Commander of NOPD’s First District, is all smiles during the FEED THE FIRST event. photo by Brenda London
Hans Ganthier is the new Commander of NOPD’s First District. photo by Brenda London

Faubourg St. John and Deutsches Haus once again joined forces to “FEED THE FIRST” during Mardi Gras weekend.  Our First District Officers work 12 hour shifts during this time and are very appreciative of the fresh breakfast and lunches we provide.

Can’t donate your time?

Faubourg St. John

is a 501c3 non-profit
Donations are tax deductible

Donations are always welcome in any amount.
Please mail checks made out to the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association to:

Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association
P.O. Box 19101
New Orleans, LA 70179

Thank you!

The officers of NOPD’s 1st District are very grateful for the support from neighborhood organizationsand the Deutsches Haus. 

Faubourg St. John and Deutsches Haus teamed up once again to provide meals for 1st District NOPD officers during Mardi Gras.Faubourg St. John and Deutsches Haus teamed up once again to provide meals for 1st District NOPD officers during Mardi Gras.Heartfelt thanks to all those who donate each year

FEED THE FIRST is not possible without your support!

FeedFirst2016gLinda Landesberg, Brenda London, Charlotte Pipes, Ronnie and Ayse Brink, Mona McMahon, Diane Angelico, Charlie London along with Joe & Doranel Stephany and  Deutsches Haus have worked hard each year to make the annual Feed the First program work!   Your support is much appreciated.

article below by Alicia Serrano of the Mid-City Messenger

FeedFirst2016b

The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is hosted its annual “Feed the First” event Mardi Gras weekend.

Brenda London, Leslie Capo and Ayse Brink prepare fresh fruit salad for the officers.At left, Brenda London, Leslie Capo and Ayse Brink prepare fresh fruit salad for the officers. photo by Diane Angelico

Faubourg St. John provides a hot breakfast and lunch to the First District NOPD officers working during the Mardi Gras weekend, with shifts that can last up to 12 hours.

FeedFirst2016a“You can’t believe how satisfying it is to see these poor officers come in from their shifts and we feed them and everybody’s in a much better mood,” Linda Landesberg, head of Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association events, said at last month’s meeting. According to Landesberg, the association will provide breakfast and lunch for about 80 officers for four days at the First District station. Bagged lunches are also provided for officers along the parade route as well.

“There is a group of us that go and we actually bring a hot breakfast and serve our First District NOPD on Saturday, Sunday and Tuesday and we also do two hot lunches for them on Saturday afternoon and on Monday afternoon,” Landesberg said.

FeedFirst2016kThis year, Faubourg St. John will partner with Deutches Haus, Parkway Bakery, Terrenova’s, The Ruby Slipper and the Fair Grounds Racecourse and Slots for breakfast and lunch food items.

Landesberg said the event normally costs the association about $1500 to get, prepare and serve the food. At the meeting, she described the hard work that goes into making the officers’ healthy breakfasts and snacks, with association members starting preparation at 4 a.m.

“We have a great time doing it, but we’re pretty exhausted afterwards,” she said. “It’s a really nice community event and the officers are happy.”

To read about one of the previous Feed the First events click here and to donate or find out how to volunteer for the event email info@fsjna.org.

photos below by Diane Angelico:

Joe Stephany and Charlotte Pipes working hard in the kitchen at Deutsches Haus.
Joe Stephany and Charlotte Pipes working hard in the kitchen at Deutsches Haus.
Ronnie Brink serving up coffee to the volunteers in the kitchen at Deutsches Haus.
Ronnie Brink serving up coffee to the volunteers in the kitchen at Deutsches Haus.

 

Opportunity to Have Fun

susan-roth-FSJ-daiquiri-booth-facebookThe Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association will once again be staffing the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo this year. Please consider volunteering for the short 3 hour shifts on Friday night May 15th, on Saturday, May 16th and on Sunday, May 17th.

All the net proceeds will go to helping to rebuild Desmare Playground.

Please lend a hand, its easy and fun. You are with at least 5 other neighbors and we have a great time.

If you are interested in volunteering, email Brenda at outreach@fsjna.org

Shifts are 11-2, 2 -5:30, 5:30 to 8:30

If you are unable to volunteer, please stop by the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo, say hello and buy a daiquiri!

Want to know more about the plans for Desmare Playground?

Check it out at: http://fsjna.org/desmare-playground-project/

boogaloo-bayoudaquiris
fsj-daiquiriboogaloodog2014may17

Opportunity to Have Fun

susan-roth-FSJ-daiquiri-booth-facebookThe Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association will once again be staffing the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo this year. Please consider volunteering for the short 3 hour shifts on Friday night May 15th, on Saturday, May 16th and on Sunday, May 17th.

All the net proceeds will go to helping to rebuild Desmare Playground.

Please lend a hand, its easy and fun. You are with at least 5 other neighbors and we have a great time.

If you are interested in volunteering, email Brenda at outreach@fsjna.org

Shifts are 11-2, 2 -5:30, 5:30 to 8:30

If you are unable to volunteer, please stop by the “Bayou Daiquiris” booth at the Bayou Boogaloo, say hello and buy a daiquiri!

Want to know more about the plans for Desmare Playground?

Check it out at: http://fsjna.org/desmare-playground-project/

boogaloo-bayoudaquiris
fsj-daiquiriboogaloodog2014may17

Fair Grounds Family Day December 20th

Coca-Cola-Family-Day-photos

COCA-COLA HOLIDAY FAMILY DAY SET FOR DECEMBER 20

 

On December 20th, the Fair Grounds will host a Coca-Cola Holiday Family Day from noon until 4 p.m. in the Starlight tent on the track apron.

family-coca-colaA merry and bright day of celebration with entertainment options for the entire family coincides with a pair of $50,000 stakes races.

Admission to the Coca-Cola Holiday Family Day Experience is $5 and children 12 and under are admitted free. General admission to the racetrack is free on December 20.

Once inside the Coca-Cola Holiday Family Day Experience, families can partake in face painting, crafts, and coloring. Cookies can be purchased and custom decorated for $1, and photo print-outs with Santa are available for $5. Food and beverage specials will be available and will include Coca-Cola beverages and Coca-Cola branded signature holiday ornaments.coca-cola-familia

On the racetrack, two stakes races for two-year olds will be offered – the $50,000 Letellier Memorial Stakes for two-year old fillies, and the $50,000 Sugar Bowl Stakes for two-year old colts and geldings. Last year’s Sugar Bowl winner, Albano, went on to place in a pair of graded stakes on the Road to the Louisiana Derby, finishing second in both the Grade III Lecomte Stakes and the Grade II Risen Star Stakes.

Coca-Coca Holiday Family Day will have a special first post of 12 p.m.

coca-cola-family-fun-day2
About Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots

Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots, the nation’s third-oldest racetrack, has been in operation since 1872. Located in New Orleans, Fair Grounds is owned by Churchill Downs Incorporated (NASDAQ Global Select Market: CHDN); it also operates a slot-machine gaming facility and 11 off-track betting parlors throughout southeast Louisiana. The 143rd Thoroughbred Racing Season – highlighted by the 102nd running of the Louisiana Derby – will run from November 2014 through March 2015. More information can be found online at www.FairGroundsRaceCourse.com.

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SUNBEAN SHINES IN LOUISIANA CHAMPIONS DAY CLASSIC, BECOMES SIXTH LOUISIANA-BRED MILLIONAIRE

NEW ORLEANS (Saturday, December 13, 2014) – Brittlyn Stable’s Sunbean turned on the heat down the Fair Grounds stretch to win his second consecutive $150,000 Louisiana Champions Day Classic and become racing’s newest and Louisiana’s sixth millionaire.  On a sunny Saturday afternoon at the historic New Orleans oval, the Pelican State-bred son of Brahms won his 13th race in 20 career starts and defeated four others, despite breaking a couple lengths behind the field.  After settling into stride in last, the bay gelding methodically made his way into contention and approached the leaders at the top of the stretch.  In the end, he overpowered stablemate Watch My Smoke, who was later disqualified for hindering One King’s Man and placed third behind that rival.  The win was his third stakes in six weeks’ time.

Ridden by Corey Lanerie, who was substituting for the injured Richard Eramia, for trainer Ron Faucheux, Sunbean traveled the 1 1/8-miles distance in 1:51.81 over a fast track after Watch My Smoke set fractions of :24.55, :49.16, 1:14.21 and 1:38.64.  Sent off at as the 3-10 favorite, the 12-time stakes winner returned $2.60, $2.10 and $2.10 and earned $90,000 to boost his career bankroll to $1,000,150.

“He got off about two or three steps behind the field,” Lanerie said.  “After that I just got him to relax and get back into the race and then he proved he was the best.”

“Usually we would like him to be in more of a stalking spot right off the pace,” added Faucheux.  “But it is what it is – he’s a good horse and good horses overcome.  We’re just so excited to win this race and move on to the next one.”

Brittlyn Stable principal Evelyn Benoit, who also owned Louisiana millionaire Star Guitar, echoed Faucheux’s enthusiasm.  “Sunbean just proved that the impossible dream is possible,” she said.  “I was dreaming about this for a week.  You really can’t dream anything like this – first Star Guitar and now Sunbean. When I saw the break, I really started praying.  Thank God Corey made it and things worked out.  We keep thinking he’s a mile or a mile and a sixteenth kind of horse, but he has proved us wrong.  Give him a horse to run at and he likes to run them down at a longer distance.”

One King’s Man returned $2.60 and $2.20 and Watch My Smoke paid $3.20 in his first race since July 2013.

Louisiana Flyboy and Request a Puck completed the order of finish.

TURF – Charles C. Smith’s String King was a popular winner of the $100,000 Louisiana Champions Day Turf in front of an appreciative Fair Grounds crowd who backed the son of Crowned King to odds of 1-2.  Under the guidance of leading rider James Graham, the 6-year-old bay gelding sat mid-pack before launching a strong stretch run that would carry him to a 1½-length victory over Tiger Run and Stormdriver.  The victory was his 14th in 33 career starts and comes one year after finishing second in the Classic to Sunbean by a heartbreaking nose.

String King completed the 1 1/16-miles turf distance in a new track record time of 1:41.84 – breaking a standard set by Dixie Poker Ace in 1994 – after Tiger Run set fractions of :23.31, :47.19 and 1:11.09.  String King paid $3, $2.60 and $2.40 and the $60,000 boosted his career bankroll to $743,552.

 

“I was a little bit (worried) down the backside, but he was rating well,” Graham said.  “He’s a good horse and does it on his own – that’s the way he is.”

 

Trainer, owner and breeder Smith was taken aback by his horse’s performance.  “There’s nothing left to say – just look at what he does for yourself,” he said.  “He has shown it on the racetrack, like always.”

 

Longshot runner-up Tiger Run returned $18 and $11, while equally disregarded Stormdriver paid $8.20.

 

The field was completed by McGeehee’s Mercy, Benwill, Skipberry Wine, Sweet Baby Gaines, Valse and Well’s Gold.

LADIES – The $100,000 Louisiana Champions Day Ladies produced a stellar wire-to-wire victory for Eugenia Thompson and Hickory Stables’ Our Quista who outlasted closing favorite I Dazzle down the stretch to a 2½-length victory under Corey Lanerie.  The lightly raced daughter of Half Ours won for the fourth time in seven starts for trainer Al Cates and won her second consecutive stakes following August’s $150,000 Elge Rasberry Stakes at Louisiana Downs.  The sophomore filly covered the 1 1/16 miles on the main track in 1:46.40 and returned $10.60, $6 and $4.80.  Blading Wild Cat was 1½ lengths astern I Dazzle in third.

“She beat the gate and broke really well,” Lanerie said.  “I felt a little pressure down the backside, but she did enough to stay in front and when I called on her she did her thing.”

Two-for-two now going a distance of ground on dirt, the dark bay charge has impressed her conditioner.  “When we stretched her out she improved tremendously,” Cates remarked.  “She gets out on the lead and relaxes and she’s been training so well.  We thought we would stretch her out here again and it worked out pretty good.”

SPRINT – The $100,000 Louisiana Champions Day Sprint featured one of the most thrilling finishes of the day when William Deckwa, Jr.’s Too Dim overcame an impossible start – spotting the field over six lengths – and ran down favored defending champion Heitai in the final yards to win by a neck under Miguel Mena for trainer Eddie Johnston.  The victory was Too Dim’s second consecutive over Heitai after a Nov. 23 half-length decision in a muddy optional claimer.  The 5-year-old gelded son of Mutakddim completed the six furlongs in 1:10.08 while winning his 10th race in 23 lifetime starts and paying $11.20, $4 and $2.60. All Owls finished third 1½ lengths behind Heitai.

“This is a nice horse, but he got left in the gate,” Mena said.  “They told me to make an eighth of a mile run on the rail and that’s what we did and it worked out.”

Johnston was elated with his horse’s performance, especially considering the dreadful start.  “I really didn’t expect this after the break,” he said.  “I was hoping he could just finish with him and get something out of the race.  Once he got on the rail and started picking it up, he just kept on coming.  It worked out.”

LADIES SPRINT – The $100,000 Louisiana Champions Day Ladies Sprint proved a formful event as the two favorites – Afternoon Tango (2.70-1) and Blessed Immaculata (2.60-1) – finished one-two.  Big Aut Farms’ Afternoon Tango proved the better of the duo as the daughter of Afternoon Deelites powered home a two-length victor over her rival, improving off her runner-up finish in last year’s event.  Ridden by Diego Saenz for Patrick Devereux, the 4-year-old dark bay filly was ridden with credence as she swooped past the leading bunch and coasted to victory over her aforementioned rival and eventual third-place finisher Wire Me Bessie, despite being on the wrong lead.

“I was surprised to be that far back, but I was happy with her,” Saenz said.  “She really responded, even though she didn’t switch leads.”

The win was Afternoon Tango’s seventh in 14 races and her second stakes win of the year after taking the $50,000 Louisiana Cup Filly & Mare Sprint at Louisiana Downs in August.  She completed the six panels in 1:11.81 on a fast track while returning $7.40, $4 and $2.80.

JUVENILE – The $100,000 Louisiana Champions Day Juvenile saw a promising and undefeated gelding stay that way in Phyllis Hodges’ Mr. L. S. Shoe, who circled the leaders en route to a three-length victory over Jazzy Rebel and Grande Basin.  Trained by James ‘Sweet’ Hodges and ridden by James Graham, the son of Forefathers was ridden confidently throughout, despite breaking from the outside 14-post.  The gray charge ran the six-furlong distance in 1:11.68 and improved his record to three-for-three while paying $4.80, $3 and $2.60.

“I was able to tuck in a little bit around the turn and he came home and finished it up,” Graham said.  “I think he’s an improving 2-year-old and he feels like there’s plenty left.  He’s so happy with himself and he rates and lets you do whatever you want with him.”

“It’s easy to train a good horse,” Hodges added.  “We’ve wondered about him because he acts up like he did today in the paddock, but my wife bred him and raised him and we’ve always thought he was special.”

LASSIE – The $100,000 Louisiana Champions Day Lassie was an exciting display of class and closing speed as Gary Scherer and Bill Ulwelling’s Wind Chill Factor asserted herself by 4¾ lengths over a competitive field of ten other fillies to win her second consecutive stakes after taking the $150,000 Louisiana Jewel on Nov. 22 at Delta.  Ridden by Willie Martinez, the daughter of Successful Appeal won for the third time in four starts while completing the six furlongs in 1:11.67.  She paid $8.40, $4.80 and $3. Longshot Lady Emily Sage was second and odds-on favorite Vivian Da Bling finished third.

“It set up perfectly,” Martinez reflected.  “On paper it looked like (the pace) would set up quickly, so right away I got a good position.  She broke perfectly and we got good momentum going to the three-eighths pole.  From there she was her own pilot.  She has started figuring out what it’s all about.  She’s really good.”

Scherer, who also trains the charge, confirmed that the filly will be pointed toward the filly division of the $100,000 Louisiana Futurity on New Years’ Eve.

STARTER – In the $50,000 Louisiana Champions Day Starter Stakes, Maggie Camejo and Antonia Noonan’s The Louisiana Kid continued his improvement since joining the Jose Camejo barn, cruising wire-to-wire under Miguel Mena and completing the mile and 70-yard event in 1:44.06 over five others by two comfortable lengths.  Sent off at 8-5, the son of Afleet Alex improved his record to seven wins in 31 starts and returned $5.40, $3.20 and $2.40.

QUARTER HORSE – In the day’s opener, the Grade II $100,000 Louisiana Champions Day Quarter Horse Classic, Douglas O. Traylor’s Dashin Gage was sent to post as the public’s 4-5 wagering choice and did not disappoint, registering a head victory over Jls Mr Bigtime. Trained by Kenny Roberts and ridden by Jose Vega, Dashin Gage covered the 440-yard distance in 21.841 seconds and returned $3.80. The $46,391 winner’s share boosted his career earnings to $332,423 as he won for the seventh time in 21 lifetime starts. Blue Louisiana Jolla was third.

By running second and earning $17,525 for his efforts, Jls Mr Bigtime became only the second Louisiana-bred quarter horse to surpass the $1 million mark in career earnings, boosting his bankroll to $1,017,472. Jls Mr Bigtime was honored with a special presentation in the winner’s circle after the race for his achievement.

Ana Alvidrez’s Scooter Prize captured the seventh race of her career in winning the $100,000 Grade II Louisiana Champions Day Quarter Horse Derby. Ridden by Raul Ramirez, Jr. for trainer Martin Trejo, Scooter Prize returned $13.60 and completed the 400-yard trip in 19.925 seconds. Scooter Prize earned $45,454 for the victory and is now a career earner of $219,845. Hesablackmagic was second and The Game Cartel finished third.

Roderick L. Carter and Mykelia Carter’s Louisiana Jambalaya kept his perfect local record intact with his third win from as many Fair Grounds starts when annexing the $100,000 Grade II Louisiana Champions Day Quarter Horse Juvenile. With his fourth win in six lifetime starts, Louisiana Jambalaya boosted his career bankroll to $178,262 with the winning prize of $45,000. Trained by Justin Dehart and ridden by regular rider Lucas Constantin, he returned $6.80 as the post-time favorite and traveled the 350-yard distance in 17.408 second. Game was second and Zoomin For Bugs was third.

About Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots

Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots, the nation’s third-oldest racetrack, has been in operation since 1872. Located in New Orleans, Fair Grounds is owned by Churchill Downs Incorporated (NASDAQ Global Select Market: CHDN); it also operates a slot-machine gaming facility and 11 off-track betting parlors throughout southeast Louisiana. The 143rd Thoroughbred Racing Season – highlighted by the 102nd running of the Louisiana Derby – will run from November 2014 through March 2015. More information can be found online at www.FairGroundsRaceCourse.com.

 

NEIGHBORHOOD MEETING DECEMBER 10th

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Neighbors are invited to attend the General Membership Meeting on Tuesday, December 10th at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Fair Grounds Black Gold room. The Black Gold room is in the back on the left hand side.

Bring Your Non-Perishable Donations for Second Harvest

 

Egg Nog and Cookies will be served.

 

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I.                Guests

·       Officer Kenneth Gill – First District Quality of Life Update

·       Dan Shea – New Orleans Advocate

·       Erik deVries – Cobalt Medical

·       Heather Pohnan – NOLAWise/Energy Smart

 

II.              Election of Executive Board Members – 2014

III.             Treasurer’s Report

IV.            Committee Reports/Updates/Actions

·       Events/Fundraising Committee  – update

·       Membership Outreach Committee – update

·       Landscape Committee – update

·       Public Safety – update

·       Zoning Committee – update

 

V.              Old Business

·       From Floor

 

VI.            New Business

·       Linda Landesberg – BCC Refresh Urban Garden

·       From Floor

 

VII.           Adjournment

 

 

MEETING TUESDAY Sept 10

FSJNA GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING AGENDA
September 10, 2013
Fair Grounds Black Gold Room | 6:30 pm

meeting2013sept10
Guests
• Officer Kenneth Gill – First District Quality of Life Update
• Fat Falafel – Proposal for 3141 Ponce De Leon

Treasurer’s Report
Committee Reports/Updates/Actions
Events/Fundraising Committee – update
Membership Outreach Committee – update
Landscape Committee – update
Public Safety – update
Zoning Committee – update

Old Business
• Odyssey House update

New Business

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