Archive for fight

MEETING MONDAY NOVEMBER 11

Posted in Featured with tags , , , , , , , on November 5, 2013 by katrinafilm

FSJ-meeting2013november11a

Meeting at 1368 Moss Street at 7 pm on Monday, Nov 11, 2013.

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MEETING MONDAY NOVEMBER 11

Posted in Featured with tags , , , , , , , on November 1, 2013 by katrinafilm

FSJ-meeting2013november11a

Meeting at 1368 Moss Street at 7 pm on Monday, Nov 11, 2013.

 

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I.                Call to Order

II.              Roll Call

III.             Explanation of Meeting Rules

IV.            Guests

·       Lindsay Morton – Whole Foods

·       From Floor

V.              Approval of October 2013 Executive Meeting Minutes

VI.            Treasurer’s Report

VII.           Committee Reports/Updates/Actions (if any)

·       Public Safety – update

·       Membership Outreach Committee – update

·       Landscape Committee- update

·       Re-Bridge – update

·       Zoning Committee – update

VIII.         Old Business

·       From Floor

IX.            New Business

·       2014 Nominations & Discussion

·       From Floor 

X.              Adjournment

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Fight Blight Saturday

Posted in Featured with tags , , on April 18, 2013 by katrinafilm

april
GRAFFITI PROGRAM – Our InitiativeKnowing that graffiti adversely affects public perception, architectural significance and the general quality of life in the French Quarter, the FQBA has stepped up to initiate a community, business and citizen-based action plan to eradicate graffiti from the Vieux Carre. Partners in this initiative are resident groups French Quarter Citizens and Vieux Carre Property Owners, Residents & Associates, Inc. “World’s Best Graffiti Removal System” has proven effective and is accepted by the Vieux Carre Commission (VCC).
Removal Methods
First, try using soap and water and a soft brush. If this does not work, use a VCC approved removal product that is appropriate for the surface. The “World’s best graffiti removal system” has been tested and determined safe on historical buildings, a permit is not required for small jobs. In many instances, you can use a graffiti removal product rather than paint.

NOTE:
PERMIT REQUIRED
You must have a permit from the Vieux Carre Commission Office to use chemicals or paint to remove graffiti. Applications for permits can be picked up in person at 334 Royal Street or downloaded off of:
http://www.cityofno.com/portal.aspx

WHAT IS GRAFFITI?

Graffiti is writing, drawings or symbols applied to any surface without the permission of the owner. To create graffiti, vandals use a variety of materials such as automotive car paint, spray paint, crayons and permanent ink. Vandals also etch surfaces as another way to destroy property.

Art or Graffiti?

The difference between art and graffiti is that art is done on property with permission of the property owner. Art is a creative and productive form of expression, whereas graffiti is a crime.

Why should I care about graffiti?

Graffiti is an act of vandalism. Not only is it unattractive, but it also lowers property values and encourages other types of crime in neighborhoods. By promptly removing graffiti, property owners can send a message to the people responsible for graffiti.

GRAFFITI PREVENTION TIPS

1. Maintain upkeep. An exterior appearance that suggests apathy and neglect attracts vandals.

2. Remove quickly. Studies show that removal within 24 to 48 hours results in a nearly zero rate of reoccurrence.

3. Control access.

•Add or improve outside lighting to promote natural surveillance.
•Limit access to roofs by moving dumpsters away from walls and covering drain pipes.
•Incorporate shrubs, thorny plants, and vines to restrict vandal access.
4. Step up security.

•Employ graffiti resistant materials or coatings on a chronically hit wall.
•Do not allow a “legal wall,” or an area that permits graffiti, at your business; they are largely ineffective and may draw more graffiti vandals to the area.
•Organize a “Business Watch” with nearby merchants to keep tabs on a business area.
•Install some type of security camera.
•Employ security personnel to monitor property.
5. Work with the community.

•Inform VC-GAP and the city when graffiti appears on your property.
•Refrain from using graffiti images in ads or promoting graffiti in any way.
•Print graffiti prevention messages on bags, sales flyers, tray liners, book covers, calendars, and other promotional
items.
JOIN THE FIGHT!

Step 1: Record

If you see a graffiti crime in progress, please contact the New Orleans Police Department immediately at 504-822-1111. Please provide a complete description of the perpetrators and/or vehicles involved, including license plate numbers. Photograph the graffiti using a color camera (digital).

NEVER APPROACH OR CONFRONT THE VANDALS YOURSELF.

Step 2: Report

Graffiti vandalism is a crime. Report graffiti to New Orleans Crime Stoppers at crimestoppersgno.org or call the non-emergency number at 504-822-1111. Upload a photo of the tagging. Please keep copies of each photograph for your personal records. These photographs help the police identify local graffiti hot spots.

Step 3: Remove

Property and business owners understand that promptly removing graffiti reduces the chances of recurrence. Also, the sooner you remove graffiti, the easier it is to clean the damaged surface.

Fight Blight Saturday

Posted in Featured with tags , , on April 17, 2013 by katrinafilm

april
GRAFFITI PROGRAM – Our InitiativeKnowing that graffiti adversely affects public perception, architectural significance and the general quality of life in the French Quarter, the FQBA has stepped up to initiate a community, business and citizen-based action plan to eradicate graffiti from the Vieux Carre. Partners in this initiative are resident groups French Quarter Citizens and Vieux Carre Property Owners, Residents & Associates, Inc. “World’s Best Graffiti Removal System” has proven effective and is accepted by the Vieux Carre Commission (VCC).
Removal Methods
First, try using soap and water and a soft brush. If this does not work, use a VCC approved removal product that is appropriate for the surface. The “World’s best graffiti removal system” has been tested and determined safe on historical buildings, a permit is not required for small jobs. In many instances, you can use a graffiti removal product rather than paint.

NOTE:
PERMIT REQUIRED
You must have a permit from the Vieux Carre Commission Office to use chemicals or paint to remove graffiti. Applications for permits can be picked up in person at 334 Royal Street or downloaded off of:
http://www.cityofno.com/portal.aspx

WHAT IS GRAFFITI?

Graffiti is writing, drawings or symbols applied to any surface without the permission of the owner. To create graffiti, vandals use a variety of materials such as automotive car paint, spray paint, crayons and permanent ink. Vandals also etch surfaces as another way to destroy property.

Art or Graffiti?

The difference between art and graffiti is that art is done on property with permission of the property owner. Art is a creative and productive form of expression, whereas graffiti is a crime.

Why should I care about graffiti?

Graffiti is an act of vandalism. Not only is it unattractive, but it also lowers property values and encourages other types of crime in neighborhoods. By promptly removing graffiti, property owners can send a message to the people responsible for graffiti.

GRAFFITI PREVENTION TIPS

1. Maintain upkeep. An exterior appearance that suggests apathy and neglect attracts vandals.

2. Remove quickly. Studies show that removal within 24 to 48 hours results in a nearly zero rate of reoccurrence.

3. Control access.

•Add or improve outside lighting to promote natural surveillance.
•Limit access to roofs by moving dumpsters away from walls and covering drain pipes.
•Incorporate shrubs, thorny plants, and vines to restrict vandal access.
4. Step up security.

•Employ graffiti resistant materials or coatings on a chronically hit wall.
•Do not allow a “legal wall,” or an area that permits graffiti, at your business; they are largely ineffective and may draw more graffiti vandals to the area.
•Organize a “Business Watch” with nearby merchants to keep tabs on a business area.
•Install some type of security camera.
•Employ security personnel to monitor property.
5. Work with the community.

•Inform VC-GAP and the city when graffiti appears on your property.
•Refrain from using graffiti images in ads or promoting graffiti in any way.
•Print graffiti prevention messages on bags, sales flyers, tray liners, book covers, calendars, and other promotional
items.
JOIN THE FIGHT!

Step 1: Record

If you see a graffiti crime in progress, please contact the New Orleans Police Department immediately at 504-822-1111. Please provide a complete description of the perpetrators and/or vehicles involved, including license plate numbers. Photograph the graffiti using a color camera (digital).

NEVER APPROACH OR CONFRONT THE VANDALS YOURSELF.

Step 2: Report

Graffiti vandalism is a crime. Report graffiti to New Orleans Crime Stoppers at crimestoppersgno.org or call the non-emergency number at 504-822-1111. Upload a photo of the tagging. Please keep copies of each photograph for your personal records. These photographs help the police identify local graffiti hot spots.

Step 3: Remove

Property and business owners understand that promptly removing graffiti reduces the chances of recurrence. Also, the sooner you remove graffiti, the easier it is to clean the damaged surface.

Be a Blight Czar

Posted in BlightStat Meetings, Featured with tags , , , , , , , , on November 30, 2012 by katrinafilm

You can be the “Blight Czar”
for your neighborhood right at your computer.

Go to http://blightstatus.nola.gov and enter the name of any street in your area to see what’s been done about that blighted house down the block.

Didn’t find what you were looking for? Maybe it wasn’t reported yet.
Click here –> http://blightstatus.nola.gov/pages/help
and
here –> http://fsjna.org/links/steps-to-stomp-out-blight/ to find out what to do.

DON’T BE “THAT GUY”
Lots of folks say they don’t have time. Someone else will do it. Well, those “someone elses” also have jobs, kids and are pressed for time. It’s up to YOU to take action to make your neighborhood better. Don’t be “that guy” that says he’s too busy.

People love to say, “there isn’t much blight in Faubourg St. John”. Why do you think that is? It’s not just because it is a great place to live and most folks are proud to live here, blight is reported and followed-up until it is gone.

Below are some examples of what you’ll find if you search at http://blightstatus.nola.gov You won’t just find the maps below but links on the addressess on the maps where you can click to find out more information. The arrows on the map are not the exact location but the general area. When you visit http://blightstatus.nola.gov and enter in a street, you will get exact addresses to click on for more information.

Check out the number of blighted property reports in Faubourg St. John on St. Ann Street alone!
2713 st ann street
2717 st ann street
2722 st ann street
2723 st ann street
2726 st ann street
2730 st ann street
2741 st ann street
2743 st ann street
2746 st ann street
2750 st ann street
2751 st ann street
2753 st ann street
2754 st ann street
2755 st ann street
2800 st ann street
2801 st ann street
2804 st ann street
2809 st ann street
2816 st ann street
2821 st ann street
2824 st ann street
2832 st ann street
2912 st ann street
2920 st ann street
2921 st ann street
2931 st ann street
2936 st ann street
3007 st ann street
3009 st ann street
3027 st ann street
3030 st ann street
3034 st ann street
3035 st ann street
3038 st ann street
3042 st ann street
3053 st ann street
3062 st ann street
3108 st ann street
3110 st ann street
3118 st ann street
3205 st ann street
3219 st ann street
3229 st ann street
3303 st ann street

BlightStatus Arrives

Posted in BlightStat Meetings with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2012 by katrinafilm

Click here to view the City’s presentation at today’s BlightStat meeting.
MAYOR LANDRIEU, CODE FOR AMERICA TO UNVEIL NEW TECHNOLOGY TO TRACK BLIGHTED PROPERTIES

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MAYOR LANDRIEU, CODE FOR AMERICA TO UNVEIL NEW TECHNOLOGY TO TRACK BLIGHTED PROPERTIES

NEW ORLEANS, LA—October 11, 2012 | Today, Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Code for America (CFA) will announce the launch of BlightStatus, a new interactive tool for residents to track the progress of blighted properties within the code Enforcement system in New Orleans.

Nearly two years ago, Mayor Landrieu announced a new, aggressive blight strategy aimed at reducing the blight count in New Orleans by 10,000 properties by 2014. A recent study released by The Greater New Orleans Community Data Center showed that blighted properties have been reduced by approximately 8,000 addresses since 2010. The study attributed the reduction in part to the focused efforts of City agencies to bring properties into compliance.

Neighborhood groups and engaged citizens have always been a crucial partner in the city’s fight against blight, and now, with the launch of BlightStatus, they will have access to previously inaccessible City data about the status of blighted properties. Easy access to this information will reduce barriers to participation in public blight hearings, and improve the quality of the interactions between the City and the community in the common goal of blight eradication.

WHO: Mayor Mitch Landrieu
Deputy Mayor Andy Kopplin
City officials
Code for America team

WHAT: Launch of BlightStatus, a new interactive tool for residents to track the progress of blighted
properties within the Code Enforcement system in New Orleans

WHEN: Thursday, October 11, 2012
1:00 PM

WHERE: 1708 St. Roch Ave.
New Orleans, LA 70117

###

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Follow the Mayor:



    BlightSTATUS makes it simple for residents to find out what’s going on with blighted properties in their community – no long waits on the telephone or visits to City Hall required.
    A great example of government transparency at work, BlightSTATUS pulls up-to-date property information directly from the City’s official records, providing a single, comprehensive and authoritiative view to the public for the very first time.









    Write to neworleans@codeforamerica.org for more information.





    http://blightstatus.nola.gov/

    For decades residents have asked for easy access to information on the status of blighted buildings, and now we’re delivering. BlightStatus is a new interactive online tool for residents to track the progress of blighted properties within the Code Enforcement system in New Orleans.

    Anyone with an Internet connection can visit http://blightstatus.nola.gov to:

    •search for any property to view its case history in a clear and simple format;
    •create a “watchlist” to track the progress of multiple properties;
    •receive email alerts whenever a property on your “watchlist” moves forward in the blight process;
    •analyze blight citywide or down to the block level using interactive maps and charts; and
    •learn more about the blight process itself at the Help Center
    Reducing blight citywide is a top priority of my administration. Blight threatens our safety, the value of our homes, our quality of life and our environment. Nearly two years ago, we announced a new, aggressive blight strategy aimed at reducing the blight count in New Orleans by 10,000 properties by 2014. A recent study released by The Greater New Orleans Community Data Center showed that blighted properties have been reduced by approximately 8,000 addresses since 2010. The study attributed the reduction in part to the focused efforts of City agencies to bring properties into compliance by prioritizing aggressive code enforcement and code lien foreclosure sales.

    Recently, the City’s blight strategy was named a 2012 Bright Idea in Government by Harvard University’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, and was awarded the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary’s Award at the 2012 Council on Philanthropy Conference for its public-philanthropic partnership with the Greater New Orleans Foundation (GNOF), the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority (NORA) and the Center for Community Progress (CCP).

    This is a major step forward in reducing barriers to public participation in blight hearings, and improving the quality of the interactions between the City and the community in the common goal of eliminating blight.

    Sincerely,
    Mitchell J. Landrieu
    Mayor
    City of New Orleans

    The Interrupters

    Posted in More Great Posts! with tags , , , , , on February 16, 2012 by katrinafilm

    sent in by the City of New Orleans

    In case you missed it, the award-winning documentary “The Interrupters” aired last night on PBS. The film centers on the successful “Ceasefire” program in Chicago where the goal was to interrupt the cycle of retaliatory violence.

    The City of New Orleans is implementing the “Ceasefire” program now. As the project moves forward, it will employ “interrupters” who are either ex-offenders or individuals on the ground, to reach members of the community who are most likely to shoot or be shot. These individuals will intervene when there is the potential for violence to arise, mediate high-risk conflict situations and prevent retaliatory violence.

    In September of 2011, Mayor Mitch Landrieu held a Crime Action Summit where he dedicated $250,000 to the “Ceasefire” program in New Orleans.

    Click here to watch “The Interrupters” documentary.