Archive for easter

EASTER EGG HUNT AT 1700 MOSS on April 2nd

Posted in CRIME, Featured, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on March 8, 2017 by katrinafilm

EASTER EGG HUNT

April 2nd at 11 a.m. at 1700 Moss
on Bayou St. John

There will be fun for all: games, crafts, and prizes, and an adult Easter Egg Hunt.

EASTER EGG HUNTHot dogs, hamburgers, and drinks (soft and otherwise) will be available.

Bring your own chairs.

Reservation is needed for adults and children
.

Contact Rose Mancini at rmancini3@cox.net or 504-251-4970 or the Haus at 504-522-8014.

RSVP by March 17

EASTER EGG HUNT

The Easter Egg Hunt is an event produced by the Deutsches Haus

The Deutsches Haus has many events and interesting things to do all year long and is an important contributor to our community.  The Deutsches Haus has partnered with the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association year after year to help “Feed the First” each Mardi Gras weekend.

Feed the First” provides  3  meals each day during the long Mardi Gras weekend to the N.O.P.D. officers of the 1st District.   The officers work extremely long hours during the Mardi Gras weekend and are very grateful for  the hot meals and treats that the “Feed the First” initiative provides.

***
DEUTSCHES HAUS HISTORY, PURPOSE, and MISSION

Incorporated in 1928, the Deutsches Haus was formed as a benevolent and social organization which evolved from the Deutsche Gesellschaft von New Orleans and several other Deutsche groups. The Deutsche Gesellschaft, whose origins dated back to 1848, provided support for the numerous German immigrants in the New Orleans area, providing them meals and housing, helping them find employment, and assisting them in reaching their ultimate destination in the United States and assisting in become U S Citizens.

Expanding on its foundation, the Deutsches Haus grew into an organization with a mission to celebrate and foster the rich culture, musical heritage, language and history of the German people. Our Oktoberfest and Volksfest Festivals features authentic German music, food and beverages for all to enjoy, as well as activities for the kids. These events are an opportunity for our local groups to generate revenue which is used to help sustain us throughout the year and assist in sponsoring future events celebrating our German heritage. But most importantly, these festivals introduce our German heritage to the New Orleans population. We sponsor speakers and German films about issues and events of interest to the German-American community that are free and open to the public.

Deutsches Haus established a scholarship fund, and working in conjunction with the University of New Orleans, Center Austria promotes the German language and German history for students chosen by the University to study in Germany during the summer.

Support is provided for the Deutsches Haus Damenchor and Mannerchor fostering our German musical heritage. Meeting space is provided for the International German speaking fraternity, Schlaraffia, promoting friendship, art, and humor.

We sponsor and support Benjamin Franklin High School and Jesuit High School, of New Orleans, in promoting German music and language through the free use of the Haus and grounds for fund raising activities for their exchange student programs and language programs.

In addition, we support other ethnic organizations, especially the Irish and Irish-Americans. We grant use of the Haus to the Irish to promote the Irish contribution to New Orleans. We offer the Haus for Irish dance and musical groups within the city, as well as, to traveling groups.

We are a Non-Profit Public Charity Corporation as defined in the Internal Revenue Section 501 (c) (3) with a volunteer Board of Directors and Officers.

The Deutsches Haus is proud to have one of the largest private archives of German memorabilia in the country, presently on extended loan to the Historic New Orleans Collection. (http://www.hnoc.org/)

The archives contain records from various German Consulates located in the city prior to 1870, local German newspapers and periodicals, genealogical records, sheet music and membership roles from early German singing societies and more. In keeping with this tradition as an educational organization the Haus sponsors German language classes, lectures and concerts.

The spirit of “Gemütlichkeit” pervades the Deutsches Haus year-round, but it is especially prominent in the early Autumn. Each year, thousands of people come to the Haus to enjoy the traditional German cuisine (everything from Schnitzel to Sauerkraut), dancing in the Biergarten, favorite folksongs and German beer and wine, all part of the annual Oktoberfest celebration. The Haus holds a number of other special events and festivals throughout the year, including Volkfest, Faschingfest (a Carnival celebration), and Tirolnacht, an evening for Austrian exchange students.

Postcard from Home

Posted in Featured with tags , , , , , , on March 31, 2013 by katrinafilm

veazie_easter_postcard_001
veazie_easter_post_card_verso_001
courtesy Tulane University

Postcard from Home

Posted in Postcards from Home with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 24, 2013 by katrinafilm

happy-easter-1906
easter-1906a
courtesy Tulane University

Easter Bunny Visits Faubourg St. John

Posted in Featured with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2012 by katrinafilm

WWL-TV posted this photo on their website of the Easter Bunny in Faubourg St. John this morning.

The Easter Bunny was waving to everyone on Esplanade Avenue at today’s Crescent City Classic.

FAUBOURG ST. JOHN

“Where Big Dreams Grow!”

//www.viddler.com/embed/3afab5b0/?f=1&autoplay=0&player=full&loop=0&nologo=0&hd=0

Living Well on Easter

Posted in Living Well with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2012 by katrinafilm

by Vivian Cahn
Reprinted from the April, 1994 edition of the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association newsletter.

Easter is this Sunday and with it the herald of spring. This marks the beginning of a mass exodus by Orleanians to the Gulf Coast or other spots for sun and fun.

What’s changed about this seasonal rite is a new awareness regarding the potential hazards of spending days in the sun. On the beach you will see lots of “crispy critters” who look as though they are completely oblivious to the dire warnings concerning skin cancer, but for the rest of us, who prefer a little caution, here is some information.

Virtually all of our wrinkles come from being out in the sun. Plus sun causes over 500,000 people to develop skin cancer each year. Almost all skin cancers occur on parts of the body most frequently exposed to the sun’s radiation — the face, neck, ears, forearms, and hands. Skin cancer is most often found in fair skinned individuals with excessive, long term sun exposure and is generally treated by a variety of surgical methods often on an outpatient basis.

To protect yourself, stay out of the sun between 10 am and 2 pm, especially during the months of April through September. Wear protective clothing when outside. Wear sunblock of SPF 15, even during the shortest exposures to the sun. Up to 15, sun protection factors (SPF’s) are fairly accurate. But the Food and Drug Administration say there are doubts whether SPF’s of 30 or more actually provide significant more protection.

The FDA also cautions that different sunscreens are needed for different skin types, that children six months to two years need and SPF of at least 4 and that it is simply best to keep children under six months out of the sun. Usually by the time you are 18, you have received one-half of your lifetime radiation.

Magical Mystery Tour – Be a New Orleanian

Posted in Magical Mystery Tour with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 4, 2012 by katrinafilm

by Charlie London
redeyesYears ago, Laura went to an Anime Convention in Houston. For those of you who don’t know, it’s a get-together for those who love Japanese graphic novels and, generally all things Japanese.

Since it was the Saturday before Easter, Laura dressed as a white bunny and wore red contacts to complete the effect. She had a basket with plastic Easter eggs full of items to give out to the participants at the convention.

While walking to the convention in full bunny regalia, she encountered a 6 year old girl who was a bit apprehensive seeing a tall white bunny with red eyes.

The girl was with her parents and grandparents visiting downtown Houston. After mustering up her courage, the little girl asked Laura, “Are you the Easter bunny?”.

Not missing a beat, Laura replied, “Why yes I am, what is your name?” The little girl replied, “My name is Sarah”. Laura gave her one of her eggs from the basket and told Sarah, “Now you be good for your parents”

The parents were very grateful and when checking out of the hotel Laura overheard the grandmother retelling the story. She did not recognize Laura without the white bunny costume and red eyes.

In New Orleans, a person walking down the street in a costume can be commonplace and just plain fun. In other cities it is a unique event to be remembered forever.

Be a New Orleanian wherever you are

Posted in New Orleans Is What I'm About with tags , , , , , , on April 13, 2009 by katrinafilm

redeyes

Laura recently went to an Anime Convention in Houston.
For those of you who don’t know, it’s a get-together
for those who love Japanese graphic novels and,
generally all things Japanese.

Since it was the Saturday before Easter, Laura dressed
as a white bunny and wore red contacts to complete the
effect. She had a basket with plastic Easter eggs full
of items to give out to the participants at the convention.

While walking to the convention in full bunny regalia,
she encountered a 6 year old girl who was a bit
apprehensive seeing a tall white bunny with red eyes.

The girl was with her parents and grandparents visiting
downtown Houston. After mustering up her courage, the
little girl asked Laura, “Are you the Easter bunny?”.

Not missing a beat, Laura replied, “Why yes I am, what is
your name?” The little girl replied, “My name is Sarah”.
Laura gave her one of her eggs from the basket and told
Sarah, “Now you be good for your parents”

The parents were very grateful and when checking out of
the hotel Laura overheard the grandmother retelling the
story. She did not recognize Laura without the white
bunny costume and red eyes.

In New Orleans, a person walking down the street in a
costume can be commonplace and just plain fun. In other
cities it is a unique event to be remembered forever.