Archive for crime

CRIME WAVE HITS AREA

Posted in CRIME with tags , , , on January 25, 2017 by katrinafilm

Monday, January 23, 2017 was a sad day for the neighborhood. Three major crimes were reported on the same day in this normally quiet area.

NOLA.com reported that authorities found “what appeared to be a stocking tied tightly” around the neck of a woman whose body was pulled from Bayou St. John on Monday, January 23, 2017. The woman, possibly in her 40s, was discovered in the water near the 4000 block of Davey Street, police said. The investigation was initially called an “unclassified death” by police, but has since been listed as a homicide. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to homicide detective Barrett Morton at 504-658-5300, or Crimestoppers at 504-822-1111.


click on the photo for a larger view
Monday night, a neighbor on Crete Street found their truck missing as they attempted to use it to get to work the next morning.
Description of vehicle involved from the owner – Color: Black, Make: GMC, Model: Sierra, Year: 2003, Type: Truck, Other details: Crete Street near Desoto /Esplanade.


The owner also said the plate is a Saints Super Bowl license plate with the following numbers 27863. Faubourg St. John neighbor Doug Dunn owns the truck. Doug can be reached at 504-400-1148. The officer covering the case is Officer Eymard. Officer Eymard can be reached by phone at 504-658-5292 or by email at cleymard@cityofno.com.


CLICK ON THE PHOTO FOR A LARGER VIEW

As a precautionary measure, take a couple of photos of your vehicle along with a photo of the license plate then keep it somewhere safe just in case.


click on the photo for a larger view
Also in the 1500 block of Crete Street on Monday, January 23, 2017, Tommy Lewis reported that a neighbor found the wheels missing from their vehicle.

If you feel uneasy about getting from your car to your home, why not have the Fair Grounds Patrol meet you there?

Have a gut feeling something isn’t right? Don’t second guess yourself,
call the Fair Grounds Patrol.

Call (504) 251-0276 or (504) 251-0111 and the Fair Grounds Patrol will meet you at your home to make sure you get in safely.

Enhanced NOPD Patrol

Mobile phone numbers of Enhanced Patrol officers:

(504) 251-0276
(504) 251-0111

As part of the ordinance allowing the New Orleans Fair Grounds to expand their operations to allow for slot machines the Fair Grounds is required to fund enhanced NOPD patrols in areas surrounding their facility. The patrol consists of two patrol cars operating 24 hours per day 7 days a week. The officers in the cars will have mobile phones and can be contacted directly by residents in the patrol area. The patrol area is defined as the area bounded by Desaix Boulevard to Moss Street to Ursulines Avenue to North Broad Avenue to St. Bernard Avenue to Desaix Boulevard.

Captain Scott, who leads the Fair Grounds Patrol says,
“The Fair Grounds patrol really helps to keep this area safer than non patrolled areas.”
Auto thefts top the list. Capt. Scott reminds everyone to please lock their vehicle’s doors.

The Fair Ground enhanced patrol began August 19th 2007.

Mobile phone numbers of Enhanced Patrol officers:

(504) 251-0276
(504) 251-0111

Please keep in mind that this patrol is in addition to regular police patrols. We should still call 911 in case of emergencies. After calling 911 it might make sense to call one of the numbers above.


Map of the Enchanced Patrol Area:

FairGroundsPatrolMap

Simple Crime Fighting Tips

Please use these tips to eliminate the opportunity for a crime in your home or on your street.

• Light Places Discourage Crime/Dark Places Encourage Crime: Leave a light on at your front and back door all night. Set timers on lights when you are away. Remove dead limbs and bushes from in front of windows. Report all street lights out as soon as you notice them. Call 311, and remember to get a service request number. When you call, give the pole number and the address of the house closest to the pole.

• Make sure you have your house number close to the front and back doors of your house.
Dark numbers on light trim are easiest to read. During an emergency, this could save precious moments.

• Install a peep hole in your exterior doors if you do not have glass around the door. NEVER open the door to a stranger. Call 911 if you are suspicious of a caller.

• Add deadbolt locks to all of your doors, particularly those with glass near the doorknob. Remove the key from the lock. If you want to keep a key close to the door for emergencies, make sure it is not reachable from the glass panels in the door.

• Make sure to notify your neighbors when you are going to be away. Set timers on both indoor and outdoor lights. Arrange for papers, mail and flyers to be taken in, and ask neighbors to place some trash in your super can and wheel it to the alley on trash day. Arrange for the lawn to be mowed while you are away. These simple steps can greatly reduce your chances of becoming the next burglary victim.

• If you have alarm systems in your car and home, use them. If you have an alarm system in your home, and you have a skylight, make sure to have the skylight wired to the alarm system. This is a new way of entering homes without being detected.

• Leave your emergency numbers with a neighbor, and leave a copy by the kitchen phone, if you have one.

• Do not leave lawn mowers, bicycles or baby strollers in the yard unattended. • NEVER leave your purse in a shopping cart at the market, in your desk at work unattended, or on the back of your chair in public. Not only will your money and credit cards be used, but you could loose your personal identity. Personal identity theft is the fastest growing crime in our area.

• Shred all documents that contain any personal information about you or your family members (bank statements, credit card receipts, etc.) to avoid being a victim of Identity Theft.

• Never take valuables to the Gym with you. Even lockers that are locked can be the scene of a theft.

• Check your surroundings before getting out of your car on your way into the house, and out of the house on your way into your car.

• Remove all valuables from sight in your car, especially GPS, iPods, CDs, cameras, laptops, purses and money. If you must leave something in your car, store it in the trunk. When valet parking, leave only your car key.

• NEVER leave your car running without you in it. Besides inviting a car theft, it is also illegal.

• If you witness a crime, write down the details as soon as possible, and keep the paper in a safe place. It could mean the difference between a conviction and an acquittal. Call 911 and read from your sheet.

• Get to know your neighbors. If you know who belongs on your block, it is easier to spot someone who does not belong. Report suspicious behavior to the police. If you suspect it is a crime, call 911. Use the words “Possible Crime in Progress.” Get involved in your community. Apathy is the partner of crime.

Fair Grounds Patrol

Posted in CRIME, Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2016 by katrinafilm

by Charlie London

Fair Grounds Patrol


fairgrounds

As the summer heat gets more intense, crimes often do as well.

If you feel uneasy about getting from your car to your home, why not have the Fair Grounds Patrol meet you there?

Have a gut feeling something isn’t right? Don’t second guess yourself,
call the Fair Grounds Patrol.

Call (504) 251-0276 or (504) 251-0111 and the Fair Grounds Patrol will meet you at your home to make sure you get in safely.

Enhanced NOPD Patrol

Mobile phone numbers of Enhanced Patrol officers:

(504) 251-0276
(504) 251-0111

As part of the ordinance allowing the New Orleans Fair Grounds to expand their operations to allow for slot machines the Fair Grounds is required to fund enhanced NOPD patrols in areas surrounding their facility. The patrol consists of two patrol cars operating 24 hours per day 7 days a week. The officers in the cars will have mobile phones and can be contacted directly by residents in the patrol area. The patrol area is defined as the area bounded by Desaix Boulevard to Moss Street to Ursulines Avenue to North Broad Avenue to St. Bernard Avenue to Desaix Boulevard.

Captain Scott, who leads the Fair Grounds Patrol says,
“The Fair Grounds patrol really helps to keep this area safer than non patrolled areas.”
Auto thefts top the list. Capt. Scott reminds everyone to please lock their vehicle’s doors.

The Fair Ground enhanced patrol began August 19th 2007.

Mobile phone numbers of Enhanced Patrol officers:

(504) 251-0276
(504) 251-0111

Please keep in mind that this patrol is in addition to regular police patrols. We should still call 911 in case of emergencies. After calling 911 it might make sense to call one of the numbers above.


Map of the Enchanced Patrol Area:

FairGroundsPatrolMap

Simple Crime Fighting Tips

Please use these tips to eliminate the opportunity for a crime in your home or on your street.

• Light Places Discourage Crime/Dark Places Encourage Crime: Leave a light on at your front and back door all night. Set timers on lights when you are away. Remove dead limbs and bushes from in front of windows. Report all street lights out as soon as you notice them. Call 311, and remember to get a service request number. When you call, give the pole number and the address of the house closest to the pole.

• Make sure you have your house number close to the front and back doors of your house.
Dark numbers on light trim are easiest to read. During an emergency, this could save precious moments.

• Install a peep hole in your exterior doors if you do not have glass around the door. NEVER open the door to a stranger. Call 911 if you are suspicious of a caller.

• Add deadbolt locks to all of your doors, particularly those with glass near the doorknob. Remove the key from the lock. If you want to keep a key close to the door for emergencies, make sure it is not reachable from the glass panels in the door.

• Make sure to notify your neighbors when you are going to be away. Set timers on both indoor and outdoor lights. Arrange for papers, mail and flyers to be taken in, and ask neighbors to place some trash in your super can and wheel it to the alley on trash day. Arrange for the lawn to be mowed while you are away. These simple steps can greatly reduce your chances of becoming the next burglary victim.

• If you have alarm systems in your car and home, use them. If you have an alarm system in your home, and you have a skylight, make sure to have the skylight wired to the alarm system. This is a new way of entering homes without being detected.

• Leave your emergency numbers with a neighbor, and leave a copy by the kitchen phone, if you have one.

• Do not leave lawn mowers, bicycles or baby strollers in the yard unattended. • NEVER leave your purse in a shopping cart at the market, in your desk at work unattended, or on the back of your chair in public. Not only will your money and credit cards be used, but you could loose your personal identity. Personal identity theft is the fastest growing crime in our area.

• Shred all documents that contain any personal information about you or your family members (bank statements, credit card receipts, etc.) to avoid being a victim of Identity Theft.

• Never take valuables to the Gym with you. Even lockers that are locked can be the scene of a theft.

• Check your surroundings before getting out of your car on your way into the house, and out of the house on your way into your car.

• Remove all valuables from sight in your car, especially GPS, iPods, CDs, cameras, laptops, purses and money. If you must leave something in your car, store it in the trunk. When valet parking, leave only your car key.

• NEVER leave your car running without you in it. Besides inviting a car theft, it is also illegal.

• If you witness a crime, write down the details as soon as possible, and keep the paper in a safe place. It could mean the difference between a conviction and an acquittal. Call 911 and read from your sheet.

• Get to know your neighbors. If you know who belongs on your block, it is easier to spot someone who does not belong. Report suspicious behavior to the police. If you suspect it is a crime, call 911. Use the words “Possible Crime in Progress.” Get involved in your community. Apathy is the partner of crime.

YOU ARE INVITED TO HAVE COFFEE WITH COPS

Posted in CRIME, Featured, HISTORY, Living Well with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 1, 2016 by katrinafilm

YOU ARE INVITED TO HAVE COFFEE WITH COPS

You’re invited to Coffee With Cops this Saturday

The NOPD and McDonald’s restaurant owners from the Greater New Orleans region are teaming up to bring together police officers and the community they serve. Come out to participating locations on Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Meet the officers who serve in your neighborhood and enjoy a free cup of coffee.

Participating McDonald’s locations:
1918 North Broad Street
•3443 South Carrollton Avenue
•3250 General DeGaulle Drive
•10001 Interstate 10 Service Road

YOU ARE INVITED TO HAVE COFFEE WITH COPS

Until the late 1700s, New Orleans was ruled by militaries. When crime reached high levels in the 1790s, Spanish Colonial Governor Baron de Carondelet called for the creation of a police force. Throughout the years it changed hands, structures and names. There was the Guard Deville (City Watch), various militia groups, and by 1817, more than four dozen officers patrolled four separate police districts. By 1852, it had grown to include a police chief, a group of 12 commanding officers and more than 300 policemen. The Civil War caused disruptions in the department, and it was reorganized and purged numerous times through the rest of the decade.

The early 1900s brought in mechanization and a motor patrol wagon, motorcycles, and seven horse-drawn patrol wagons. In 1915 the department had 520 policemen and by the late-20s, was battling bombings, fights, shootings and assaults. In 1922, it was recognized as the only police department in the nation equipped for first aid in all of its bureaus. Modernization continued as the city fought an increase in crime while battling gambling and the mob.

Controlling crowds of more than a half million people during Mardi Gras, the N.O.P.D. is noted as having some of the best crowd control skills of any police department in the world. For more information, visit the NOPD’s web site at www.nola.gov/government/nopd.

YOU ARE INVITED TO HAVE COFFEE WITH COPS

PUBLIC SAFETY MILLAGE ON BALLOT THIS SATURDAY

Posted in CRIME, Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2016 by katrinafilm

 April 9, 2016: Two Millages will be on the ballot for voter consideration

Put Public Safety First

Get the Facts about the Public Safety Millage

The public safety millage includes 5 mills dedicated for police and 2.5 mills dedicated for fire protection. The mills are dedicated and are not subject to the homestead exemption.  Proceeds from the millage are needed to hire and pay for additional police officers to reduce crime and response times and pay firefighters what they are owed as part of the pension settlement announced last year.

Why Do We Need This?

Public safety is our top priority. 

The City has seen unprecedented growth in recent years, fueled by a growing population, rising property values, and substantially increased sales tax from new retail establishments. That growth has been prioritized to public safety.  We’re spending tens of millions more each year on NOPD, NOFD and the Sheriff. Unfortunately, that growth is starting to level off in 2016 and is expected to slow in 2017.

To continue to hire 150-200 police officers each year, even with standard attrition, requires not only revenue from growth but also money from a dedicated millage. The firefighters pension requires additional funds. Combined and with other looming liabilities hanging out there like the Sheriff’s consent decree, these demands far outpace our growth.

How Much Will it Cost Me?

According to the Census Bureau, the median value of owner-occupied housing in Orleans Parish is approximately, $183,700. If passed, the owner of a $183,700 home will pay $138 more in property taxes annually.

What Does This Pay For?

Police and fire protection for the City of New Orleans.

Funds raised from the 5 mills for police in the public safety millage will be dedicated solely to hiring and paying for additional police officers so we can grow to 1600 officers. The 2.5 mills in the public safety millage for fire protection will pay firefighters what they are owed, including fully funding the pension as part of an agreement with the firefighters union on the decades long firefighters back pay lawsuit and pension lawsuit announced in October 2015.

Five Year Plan

In order to reach a police force size of 1600 within five years, NOPD must be able to add a net of 90 officers per year. With attrition this means that 185 new officers must be hired each year from 2017-2020 to reach this goal by the end of 2020.

Fixing Our Streets

Get the Facts About the Streets Millage

Voters will be asked to renew a general obligation bond millage that will free up to $100 million more for street repairs over the next three years.

What Will It Do?

Generate $120 million over the next 3 years.

How Much Will it Cost Me?

This is NOT an increase in property taxes. The tax rate will stay the same.

What Street Projects Will This Pay For?

Roadway Capital Improvements will fall into the following four broad categories.

Download Factsheet on Public Safety and Streets Millages 

 

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The public safety millage includes 5 mills dedicated for police and 2.5 mills dedicated for fire protection. The mills are dedicated and not subject to the homestead exemption. Proceeds from the millage are needed to hire and pay for additional police officers to reduce crime and response times and to pay firefighters what they are owed as part of the pension settlement reached last year. In November of 2014, voters in Orleans Parish and statewide passed a Constitutional amendment allowing the tax to be placed on the ballot, raising the special millage caps for police and fire protection from 5 to 10 mills. To place the public safety millage on the ballot for April 9, the City Council must pass a resolution tomorrow, Jan. 7 at its regular meeting. The public safety millage, if passed, has a 12-year sunset period that would begin on Jan. 1, 2017, and continue through Dec. 31, 2028.

safetyfirst“Public safety is our top priority,” said Mayor Landrieu. “We must hire and train a larger, more professional police force that will give us the tools required to reduce violent crime, reduce response times and provide our residents with the security we all deserve. These funds are needed to continue to recruit and hire aggressively over the next several years so that we can reach our department goal of 1,600 officers. We also must honor our commitment to our firefighters. These people put their lives on the line to save others, and we must honor the commitment that our city made.”

District A Councilmember Susan G. Guidry said, “This public safety millage is critical to building a Police Department and Fire Department that our citizens deserve and need. We all agree that we need more boots on the ground to protect public safety and our citizens. And the City and NOPD have done a tremendous job in bringing recruitment and retention back into positive territory in 2015. But without this millage, the City will not have enough funds available to continue to hire new police officers beyond 2016.”

Nick Felton, President of New Orleans Fire Fighters Association, Local 632, said, “New Orleans Firefighters are committed to serving this city and making public safety our number one priority. We truly appreciate the continued support we receive from the people of New Orleans. A vote for this millage is a vote to improve public safety. A vote for better fire protection. A vote for better police protection. A vote for a safer city.”

David A. Kerstein, Chairman of the Business Council of New Orleans & the River Region, said, “The Business Council has worked extensively with the administration, City Council, and police and firefighters to address budget challenges impacting the city’s ability to provide essential public safety services, including spearheading the resolution of the long-running dispute over management and solvency of the New Orleans Firefighters Pension & Relief Fund. Additionally, along with the New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation, we have played an integral role in streamlining and enhancing efforts to recruit and retain NOPD officers. Our work has led us to conclude that the proposed increases in the police and fire millages are necessary to keep our city moving forward.”

The 5 mills dedicated to the police are expected to generate $17.7 million. The 2.5 mills dedicated to fire are expected to generate $8.9 million.

The 2.5 mills in the public safety millage for fire protection will pay firefighters what they are owed, including fully funding the pension as part of an agreement with the firefighters union on the decades-long firefighters back pay lawsuit and pension lawsuit announced in October 2015. The settlement resolves these significant liabilities, keeps the city on a positive fiscal track, makes major reforms to the pension and ensures that it will be there for future generations of firefighters. The settlement included major structural reforms that will indeed help to fix the broken pension system and effectively save taxpayers $200 to $300 million over the next 30 years.

Public Safety Millage will be on the ballot this Saturday, April 9, 2016

Proposed Ballot Language for Public Safety Millage:

“Shall the New Orleans City Council be authorized to annually levy an increase in ad valorem taxes of a total of seven and one-half (7.5) mills as follows: (1) dedicated solely for recruiting, hiring, equipping and paying police officers for increased police protection, in the amount of and not exceeding five (5) mills on the dollar of assessed real property valuation throughout the city and (2) dedicated solely for fire protection in the amount of and not exceeding two and one-half (2.5) mills on the dollar of assessed real property valuation throughout the city, for twelve (12) years, beginning January 1, 2017 and ending December 31, 2028, (an estimated $17.7 million reasonably expected to be collected at this time for an entire year as a result of the 5 mills increase for police protection and an estimated $8.9 million reasonably expected to be collected at this time for an entire year as a result of the 2.5 mills increase for fire protection), in accordance with Article VI, Section 26(E) of the Louisiana Constitution?”

Public Safety Millage’s Cost to Homeowners

This 7.5 public safety millage is not subject to the homestead exemption. According to the Census Bureau, median value of owner-occupied housing in Orleans Parish is approximately $183,700. If this millage is approved, an owner of an $183,700 home will pay $138 more in property taxes annually, or approximately $11.50 more per month.

· If passed, the owner of a $150,000 home will pay $113 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $200,000 home will pay $150 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $250,000 home will pay $188 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $300,000 home will pay $ 225 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $350,000 home will pay $263 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $400,000 home will pay $300 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $450,000 home will pay $338 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $500,000 home will pay $375 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $750,000 home will pay $563 more annually.

· If passed, the owner of a $1,000,000 home will pay $750 more annually.

SUPPORTING NOPD

In recent years, the NOPD has kicked off an unprecedented recruitment effort to grow the size of NOPD to reduce crime and improve response times. The department has a plan to grow to 1,600 officers. For the first time in several years, the NOPD is hiring more officers than it has lost through attrition by the end of the year. Four recruit classes were launched in 2015, bringing the total to eight classes since 2010. At the current rate, significant new funding will be needed to continue to hire new officers starting with the 2017 budget. Funds raised from the 5 mills for police in the public safety millage will be dedicated solely to recruiting, hiring, equipping and paying for additional police officers.

On Jan. 1, 2016, the last of three pay raises went into effect, boosting the pay for officers of all rank. In total, when compounded, the Landrieu Administration has increased police salaries by 15.8 percent since taking office in 2010, which means a police officer making $45,000 in 2010 will be making $52,093 in 2016.

Since Mayor Landrieu took office in May 2010, more than $41 million has been dedicated to rebuild and improve NOPD facilities, including new 5th and 7th District stations. In addition, the City has fully funded the five-year, $55 million consent decree for better training, equipment and police. To better equip NOPD officers, the City has purchased 628 body worn cameras, 450 new police cars and 50 motorcycles.

FIREFIGHTERS PENSION AGREEMENT

In October 2015, the City of New Orleans reached an agreement with the Firefighters Union on the decades-long firefighters back pay lawsuit and pension lawsuit. The settlement resolved these significant liabilities, keeping the city on a positive fiscal track, making major reforms to the pension and ensuring that it will be there for future generations of firefighters.

The $75 million settlement required an upfront payment of $15 million for the outstanding back pay, with the balance paid over 13 years. The City’s potential liability of more than $200 million is satisfied under the terms of the settlement, and its ability to deliver essential services to residents, such as police, fire, EMS, street repairs and parks and recreation will not be threatened.

The settlement includes major structural reforms that will indeed help to fix the broken pension system and effectively save taxpayers $200 to $300 million over the next 30 years. Under the terms of the settlement, the City will be allowed to satisfy the $21 million that it owes the pension fund by making its annual contribution to the fund.

###

SAFE ON OUR STREETS

Posted in CRIME, Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2016 by katrinafilm

Safe on Our Streets New Orleans (SOS NOLA) is working to unify and amplify the voices of New Orleans residents, neighborhood groups, and community organizations about crime prevention. One of the first things they’re doing is promoting a Neighborhood Level Crime Survey for ‪#‎NOLA‬ residents to share their experience with crime, law enforcement response, crime prevention resources, and perceptions of public safety here in town. It is a short (5 minute) survey of 17 questions.

If you’re concerned about crime in New Orleans, please take a look!
Thanks!
www.sosnola.com
StChasAveAssocOur entire city is endangered by out-of-control crime. For the past three months, a coalition led by the St. Charles Avenue Association and St. Claude Main Street has been working with a diverse group of neighborhood leaders and civic associations to amplify and unify our voices and to find real, creative and effective solutions.

stclaudeindexTo date, more than 50 neighborhood associations and civic organizations have participated in our meetings, all focused on tapping into the concerns of citizens and to seek solutions to the crime problems that grip our city. After surveying our neighborhoods citywide and listening to the leaders, we are mobilized.

Our committed organization, S.O.S., (“Safe on Our Streets”) welcomes all neighborhoods to join the effort to make the outrageenough1 heard and solutions known. Neighborhood and civic organizations can join by emailing stchasaveassoc@gmail.com. We need and want your energy and desire to make every New Orleanian safe on our streets.

The survival of this great city depends on solving this heinous problem. By speaking with one united voice, City Hall and others will hear our distress call — S.O.S — and make crime the No. 1 priority.

Camille J. Strachan president, St. Charles Avenue Association New Orleans

Jonathan M. Rhodes past president, St. Claude Avenue Main Street New Orleans

S.O.S  (Safe on Our Streets) works to improve public safety in all neighborhoods in New Orleans. To achieve this, S.O.S supports a network of more than 50 culturally, ethnically and geographically diverse neighborhood and civic organizations  to make all streets safe. S.O.S works to unify the voices of New Orleans residents, advocate for best practices in policing, and ensure the fair allocation of technology, programs and other public resources in order to reduce crime.

 S.O.S was founded in 2015 by a diverse group of community groups all concerned about the staggering rise in crime. Throughout Greater New Orleans, S.O.S. is committed to making the streets of this city safe for all.

walk-against-crime-May29

Faubourg St. John residents support the New Orleans Police Department’s 1st District

ADOPT-A-BLOCK

Posted in CRIME, Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , on January 22, 2016 by katrinafilm

Camera2Adopt-A-Block is an innovative program that aims to increase the number of private security cameras in crime hot spots in New Orleans. Adopt-A-Block supports and enchances the overall SafeCamNOLA project, a citywide camera registry that helps the NOPD identify suspects and solve crimes.

Adopt-A-Block works with churches, businesses, homeowners and the NOPD to install private security cameras in crime hot spots. The equipment and installation in selected neighborhoods will be funded through private donations administered by the NOPJF. Installation areas will be approved on a case-by-case basis.

If you are a property owner and would like to apply as a candidate for security camera installations, please send an email to safecam@nopjf.org with your name, phone number and the address where you would like to install cameras.

Only a limited number of applicants will be selected for installations. Decisions will be made in conjunction with NOPD District Commanders on the basis of crime trends and the firsthand knowledge and experience of district officers.

If you are a security camera vendor/installer and you are interested in partnering with NOPJF, please email Nathaniel Weaver at nathaniel@nopjf.org.

To donate to Adopt-A-Block, please visit our donations page.

SAFE ON OUR STREETS

Posted in CRIME, Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 9, 2016 by katrinafilm

StChasAveAssocOur entire city is endangered by out-of-control crime. For the past three months, a coalition led by the St. Charles Avenue Association and St. Claude Main Street has been working with a diverse group of neighborhood leaders and civic associations to amplify and unify our voices and to find real, creative and effective solutions.

stclaudeindexTo date, more than 50 neighborhood associations and civic organizations have participated in our meetings, all focused on tapping into the concerns of citizens and to seek solutions to the crime problems that grip our city. After surveying our neighborhoods citywide and listening to the leaders, we are mobilized.

Our committed organization, S.O.S., (“Safe on Our Streets”) welcomes all neighborhoods to join the effort to make the outrageenough1 heard and solutions known. Neighborhood and civic organizations can join by emailing stchasaveassoc@gmail.com. We need and want your energy and desire to make every New Orleanian safe on our streets.

The survival of this great city depends on solving this heinous problem. By speaking with one united voice, City Hall and others will hear our distress call — S.O.S — and make crime the No. 1 priority.

Camille J. Strachan president, St. Charles Avenue Association New Orleans

Jonathan M. Rhodes past president, St. Claude Avenue Main Street New Orleans