City Takes Action on Flooding Problem on Bayou Road

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2017 by katrinafilm

CITY TAKES ACTION ON FLOODING PROBLEM


photos courtesy Robert Thompson

flooding at Kruttschnitt Park

During the recent cleanup at Kruttschnitt Park organized by Robert Thompson, several volunteers noted that the storm drain was full of debris. Robert Thompson followed up with the City. Flooding at North Dorgenois and Bayou Road during rain events has been mitigated…for now.

Robert said, “This is a great step for our neighborhood effort to improve the area with focused action.”

Many thanks to Robert and all the neighborhood volunteers who are making a difference!

Check out Robert’s City Beautiful Clubs Facebook page for more:
www.facebook.com/CityBeautifulClubs

Before Robert Thompson and the City took action, this area flooded during any rain event.

Before concerned neighbors and the City took action, this clogged drain caused street flooding in the area.

In 1906, the City designated the triangular portion of ground bounded by N. Dorgenois, Bell Street, and Bayou Road as a place of rest and recreation, then named it Kruttschnitt Place. Ernest B. Kruttschnitt (1852-1906) was a popular local attorney and educator. President of the Board of Education from 1890-1903, he was the nephew of Judah P. Benjamin. President of the Louisiana Constitutional Convention, a post to which he was unanimously elected, Kruttschnitt was also an administrator of the Tulane Education Fund and had headed the Pickwick Club. When he was laid to rest, on his 54th birthday, schools closed in his honor.

Anyone who has been through a major storm or regular rainfall in New Orleans knows that clogged catch basins contribute significantly to street flooding.

The pumps can’t pump what they can’t get. If your catch basin is clogged, please clean it today. If you need help, get with your neighbors and clean all the catch basins on your street. If you still need help, write to info@fsjna.org and we’ll help you get it done.

A catch basin, which is also known as a storm drain inlet or curb inlet, is an opening to the storm drain system that typically includes a grate or curb inlet at street level where storm water enters the catch basin and a sump captures sediment, debris and associated pollutants. Catch basins are able to prevent trash and other floatable materials from entering the drainage system by capturing such debris by way of a hooded outlet. The outlet pipes for catch basins on combined sewers (sanitary waste and storm water in a single pipe) are also outfitted with a flapper (trap) device to prevent the backflow of any unpleasant odors from pipes. Catch basins act as pretreatment for other treatment practices by allowing larger sediments to settle in the basin sump areas.

It is important to maintain catch basins to prevent storm sewer blockages and minimize the amount of pollutants entering storm sewers which may eventually discharge into local streams and waterways such as Lake Ponchartrain. Clogged catch basins can also result in the ponding of water along streets and parking lots causing a nuisance to motorists, pedestrians and businesses.

How you can help: When you are clearing your sidewalk or driveway, dispose of waste in trash receptacles instead of sweeping it into the gutters or catch basins.

If leaves or other debris are blocking a catch basin near your house or business, remove and dispose of the debris properly.

Article from:
http://www.bwsc.org/PROJECTS/Maintenance/catchbasin.asp

THE CITY IS ASKING THAT YOU CALL 311 FOR
CATCH BASINS THAT NEED MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT TO CLEAR

 

If you have questions, or if your catch basin requires mechanical cleaning or maintenance, call 311 to report the problem.

 

HERE’S HOW YOU CAN HELP:1) Clean litter and debris from the catch basins near your house. Also, clean the surrounding curb area, because any litter, leaves, or grass on the street or sidewalk can end up in the catch basin. Do not lift the drain cover or attempt to disassemble the catch basin; just clean what you can see. All you need is a pair of work gloves, a shovel or small rake, and a trash bag. Remember: If your neighbor is elderly or disabled, please help clean their catch basin too.

2) Dispose of trash and lawn clippings in trash cans. Do not sweep or blow yard waste into the gutters and catch basins. Remember: Trash in our streets ends up as trash in our lake!

3) Construction sites or sites with hazardous materials must take special precautions to properly dispose of their paint and chemicals. They should not sweep, blow or hose waste into the catch basins. Report any improper actions to the City of New Orleans by calling 311.

Residents are advised to stay at home during the severe weather unless an emergency makes it absolutely necessary for them to get on the road. The NOPD will ticket motorists who drive faster than 5 mph on streets with standing water.

The following is a list of streets prone to significant flooding during severe weather.

Calliope @ Claiborne towards Tchoupitoulas St
Calliope & Tchoupitoulas St On-ramps
I-10 and Tulane Exit towards Claiborne
Airline & Tulane Ave intersection
4400 Block of Washington
Washington Ave. near Xavier
All surrounding streets to St. Charles flooded, Gravier/Tulane/S Dupre, S Claiborne/Washington.
Claiborne/Orleans Ave.
S Carrollton/Palmetto
Magazine/St Mary
Broad/Louisiana Ave./S.Claiborne
Josephine/Prytania
Earhart/Jeff Davis-Carrollton
500 blk of Lake Marina
Canal Blvd/I-10/Navarre
Erato/S Genois/City Park/Carrollton
Washington Ave. near Xavier, Washington
Gravier/Tulane/S Dupre
S Claiborne/Washington
Simon Bolivar & Calliope coming from Loyola Ave under the overpass
Poland Ave from St Claude to N. Claiborne
S. Claiborne at Joseph
Holiday to the Crescent City Connection
Shirley and DeGaulle
DeGaulle under the Westbank Expressway
General Meyer from Pace to Shirley
Richland and General Meyer
MacArthur and Holiday
Tullis
Garden Oaks
Chelsea
Vespasian and Wall

The City’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness monitors severe weather and keeps residents updated through e-mail alerts and the Twitter handle @nolaready.

It’s Easy to Forget that Broad is part of U.S. Hwy 90

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Uncategorized on February 7, 2017 by katrinafilm

Sent in by Robert Thompson

The Old Spanish Trail (never really a Spanish Trail) passes right in front of Faubourg St. John.
We sometimes forget N. Broad is US 90. http://drivetheost.com/

 

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/resurrecting-the-original-road-trip-on-americas-ghost-highway

Resurrecting the Original Road Trip on America’s Ghost Highway

A piece of the Old Spanish Trail, Milton, Fla. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

In the past 15 years, while hunting for missing pieces of the Old Spanish Trail, Charlotte Kahl would sometimes find herself following pick-up trucks. She could be in a town she’d never been in before, at 7 or 8 o’clock in the morning, and everything would be quiet. But when she found the shop with the pick-up trucks, she would find the farmers. They’d be done with feeding their animals, in town for their morning coffee.

“And those old farmers, if they can’t tell you where the highway was, they’ll tell you who to go see,” she says.

Kahl is the chairperson of OST100, an organization dedicated to one of the country’s original interstate routes, first conceived 100 years ago and now faded into a ghost road, buried beneath six-lane highways, suburban sprawl, or sometimes dirt, brush and feet of desert sand. The Old Spanish Trail, when it was completed in 1929, was 2,743 miles of brick, asphalt, concrete, and wooden plank, and it crossed the southernmost states from East to West, starting in St. Augustine, Florida, and ending in San Diego, California.

It’s still possible, if difficult, to make that trip on the old road. But Kahl and her organization aim to restore the Old Spanish Trail to its former vigor, as one of the country’s great interstate routes, the kind of road people fantasize about traveling from end to end.

And if her plan works, in 2029, a celebratory caravan of cars will start in St. Augustine and travel all the way to San Diego, on the the very same trip the road’s founders made 100 years before, when the trail was finally completed.

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Florida (Image: drivetheost/Flickr)

This road was built just as the dream of the American road trip took shape. For the first time, really, Americans could get in a car and drive west, west, and further west, until they hit the Pacific and had to wonder if they’d found what they were hoping for. In 1929, 70 percent of the road was paved, “and the rest is good going,” an advertising circular promised. Three years before, when just 50 percent was “paved or under contract,” Colonel Ed Fletcher drove the entire distance in 75 hours and 33 minutes, averaging 37 miles per hour, in the family Cadillac. The whole trip took a little over a week, and included a 14-mile boat ride across Mobile Bay, ferry trips in New Orleans and Beaumont, Texas, and a stop to take moving pictures in Yuma, Arizona.

From the beginning, the Old Spanish Trail was very deliberately laden with mystique. Harral Ayres, the road’s chief booster and director of the Old Spanish Trail Association, sold the road, not entirely accurately, as the “route first traveled in American by Spanish Conquistadors more than four hundred years ago.” It needed a little romance, though, because building it required tackling very practical and expensive problems. The tributaries rushing from the continent’s heart into the Gulf needed to be spanned with bridges; a road that ran along the Gulf also needed protection from the sea and waves. Further west, in the desert, roads were still being built of wooden planks, in sections which, when covered in sand, could be lifted at one end and cleaned off. In the end, the road cost about $80,000,000 to build—more than a billion in today’s dollars.

Although much of the original road has been subsumed by I-10 and other large highways, it’s still possible to drive long stretches of the road, at least as it existed in the 1930s, through Florida, Louisiana and Texas. And where the original route has been lost, Kahl is trying to convince others to find the road, map it, preserve it, and pretty it up. She is planning a centennial motorcade that will travel along the road all the way across the country.

Mossy Head, Fla. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

Preparations for that celebration begins this year, a century after planning for the road began. This winter, OST100 will convene a conference in Mobile, Alabama, where the first meeting of businessmen interested in building the road met, in 1915. At the time, there was no formal, federal system of interstate highways; instead, businessmen and activists from the Good Roads Movement were banding together to advocate and fundraise for roads where none had been. This new and growing network of roads was already rooting down into the south from points north. By the time the Old Spanish Trail’s founders first met, the Atlantic Highway connected Maine to Miami. The Dixie Highway, and the Jackson Highway were coming on down to other Southern cities. But there were no roads connecting the southern border states to each other.

Ellaville, Fla. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

At that first meeting, the Old Spanish Trail was conceived as a road that could connect east to west, Florida to California. Harry Locke, a mapmaker and “pathfinder,” showed up with a route that would connect Houston and Los Angeles. But the exact route would take shape over years, as the Great World War delayed planning and different cities and regions vied to be on the road. There was a trickle of federal money for road-building, after the first highway funding bill passed in 1916, but the most part, roads went where businesses or communities would pay to build them. The early Old Spanish Trail Association was a dues-paying organization, and not paying had consequences.

“In Texas,” says Kahl, “there was a city that didn’t pay their dues. Another city wanted the road, and they were willing to pay for it.” The road jogged south—to the city that would pay.

Locke, who became the field engineer for the project, had a huge amount of power over the where the road would go, too. “He was strong-arming people to get advertisements,” says John Murphey, an architectural historian and old roads enthusiast, who’s driven the trail more than once. “When they were thinking of termini, in Florida, he was basically telling Miami: You put an advertisement in this map, or you’re not going to be the terminus.” (Apparently Miami did not budge, since the terminus is St. Augustine.)

By 1923, at least, the San Diego terminus had been chosen and the zero-mile stone set. And finally, after almost a decade and a half of construction, the road was declared complete in 1929, and the stone in St. Augustine dedicated. By then, the federal government had started work on system of numbered federal highways (the Old Spanish Trail would be part of what’s now called Old U.S. 80 and 90) and, less than a decade later, would start thinking about larger, better interstate roads—the country’s first superhighways, which would make early auto trails like the OST obsolete.


The Old Spanish Trail Association’s map of the road (Image: Courtesy of OST100)

Driving the Old Spanish Trail, if you want to stick to the original route as much as possible, is a bit of a challenge. Before Murphey and his wife set out on their first trip on the road, they had to go through a massive data gathering project, paging through old maps and publications, trying to plot that over current highway maps. “We probably missed some really vintage or private land alignments,” he says. “But we hit most of it. We did a lot of trespassing.”

Their effort paid off.  “When you hit a place that hasn’t been changed and there’s not modern development, it’s a little bit transcendent,” he says. “There’s a section east of Tallahassee that’s still red earth road. You can just imagine bobbing along in the 1920s.”

A stretch of original OST in the Florida panhandle (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

Of course, in many places, things have changed. In cities, the route of the old highway goes through run-down areas; outside, suburban sprawl lines roads that once would have been almost empty. These roads were built before the infrastructure to support travelers, and early roadtrippers would not have had the luxury of roadside motels and diners.

On some stretches, the OST has just been forgotten. Kahl first started researching the trail back in 2000, after a San Antonio road crew clearing room for equipment found a strange, stone bench hiding in the brush in a corner of her neighborhood.

“In south Texas, when we say brush, it’s pretty prickly,” she says. “You just don’t go in there. That’s the way it was saved for decades. We don’t even know how long it was overgrown.”

Besides the bench, there was a metal decoration with the letters OST woven into it, and when she went online to start puzzling out what it could mean, all she found was references to oysters and smoked turkey from Great Britain, University of Tennessee computer courses, and geographical references in German.

The bench in San Antonio (Image: Courtesy of OST100)

Even once she had found out the OST was a road, that didn’t help her find the actual route. She and a few others decided they would focus on documenting the 50 miles that run through San Antonio’s Bexar County. That’s how she found herself following pick-up trucks through small Texas towns and interviewing farmers.

Sometimes there’d be other clues, too. In Texas, the OST beautification committee planted palm trees along the road’s route, and as a result a straight row of palms heading straight off the curve of a road still echo the OST’s route. Low water crossings didn’t get bridges; old Model Ts had to cross them at an angle to make their way through. Any crossing built at a 90 degree angle to a small trickle of water is a hint to get out of the car and search in a farmer’s field for the trace of a road coming through the creek. At a ferry crossing, Kahl tramped through bushes and muck to find the dock and wharf. Sometimes the road would be abandoned, and she would have to take a metal pole and poke down to find where the asphalt was, under the overgrowth of the bushes and grass in the field, she says.

A county line marker along the old road (Photo: Courtesy of OST100)

This is the type of work that Kahl’s now trying to convince other people to take on. Her goal, by 2029, is to have the entire route historically designated. She’s also trying to convince the 67 counties along the route to build hiking and biking trails all along the way. “We call it cleaning up for the party,” she say. “We’re hoping by ‘29, tourists will be driving, walking, barnstorming and biking the trail.”

By then, she’ll be 87. But she’s still planning on traveling across the country to celebrate the centennial. “People will have to help me on and off the bus when we take that grand motorcade tour,” she says.

It seems like a massive project, but she figures that if the road’s founders built it in 15 years, her group can clean it up in that same time. And if they don’t, most likely the Old Spanish Trail will soon fade in obscurity forever. Once, the federal government might have funded this sort of historical preservation, but budgets are tighter now. As Murphey puts it, “It’s up to the communities to investigate their auto heritage and bring it to the fore.” And the Old Spanish Trail, he says, is really Charlotte’s baby. Now she just needs more people to sign on to help.

Wellborn, Fla. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

Whitehouse, Fla. (Photo: drivethost/Flickr)

Des Allemands, La. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

Huey Long Bridge, Jefferson Parish, La. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

Lake Charles, La. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

OST bench, San Antonio (Photo: Courtesy of OST100)

Biloxi-Ocean Springs Bridge, which no longer exists (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

Mesa, Ariz. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

Yuma, Ariz. (Photo: drivetheost/Flickr)

 

Be a Rock-n-Roll Volunteer THIS Weekend

Posted in Featured, HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , on February 1, 2017 by katrinafilm

Race Day is THIS weekend

190 more volunteers are needed for this weekend’s event.

Here is the list of available shifts and number of volunteers needed:

Thursday Expo Setup – Convention Center Hall J
1pm(may be finished earlier) (10 vols needed)
Unboxing athlete shirts and placing in large bins according to size. NO heaving lifting.

Friday Expo Morial Convention Center Hall J
11am-3pm (20 vols needed) or 2pm-6pm (40 Volunteers needed).
(I can adjust these times if someone needs flexibility)
FREE PARKING AT THE EXPO, LOT G, across from Hall J

Saturday 5k – City Park, Roosevelt Mall Drive
530am-830am – 25 Volunteers needed
FREE PARKING near CITY PARK

Sunday
Start Line
– St Charles/Camp & Poydras 5:30am-830pm

Start Area Corral Captains – 30 needed
.
This is a great shift for those running – you can be at the front of your corral or in a different corral. *Participants can help too! Simply Hold the Rope at the front of the corral…. walk to the starting line, and Drop the rope as you reach the starting line.
EASY BREEZY….. You can even pick what corral you would like to be captain of!**
Your shift ends when you reach the start line!!

Finish Line – City Park – Roosevelt Mall Drive
(1) Finish line – 6am-12pm, distributing medals, refreshments at 10k, half and full marathon sides. (75 volunteers needed) FREE PARKING near CITY PARK.

Volunteers can sign up online: http://tinyurl.com/Rock-n-Roll-VOLUNTEER
Call (504)301-6100 with any questions.

All volunteers will receive a race-crew shirt, complimentary parking and are
entered to win a whole slew of prizes
.
Thanks so much! Let me know if you have any questions, or need anything else! Have a great day!

**GROUPS of 10 or more may be eligible for donation. Call (504) 301-6100 for more details.

Anyone and everyone is welcome to volunteer.
Please feel free to forward this to friends family.
THANKS!

VOLUNTEER CONTACT INFO:
Jodi Archer
Volunteer Coordinator
Rock ‘n’ Roll New Orleans Marathon & ½ Marathon
Phone: 504.301.6100
E-Mail: NewOrleans@RNRRaceCrew.com

Keeping Neighborhood Parks Beautiful

Posted in HISTORY with tags , , , , , , , , on January 25, 2017 by katrinafilm

City Beautiful Club Friends:

Veteran volunteers and a new friend tackled the first step in recovering a lost pocket park at Bayou Road and N Dorgenois. A giant mulch pile courtesy of Park and Parkways personnel appeared and challenged the small but determined City Beautifer crew to spread it. Earlier, Phillip Mollere brought two truckloads of mulch and started the project.

Sally Gaden and Annie LaRock (with super-pup Fang) led the effort, cleaning gutters, picking up litter and spreading the mulch.

Passerby, and new member, Josh Lewis pitched in, lent a hand and taught us something about “microbial diversity”! (He teaches Ecology at Tulane!)

Much appreciated praise and approval came from onlookers Josh Barbee (Ursulines Triangle CBC Guy), Ben the welder, and Robert Tannen whose art piece occupies the other end of the park.

I think all agree the place is looking more like a park than a parking lot!

Thanks to all involved in getting this park back on track.

Robert Thompson
City Beautiful Clubs
www.facebook.com/CityBeautifulClubs

***

baltimoreThe city of Baltimore’s high crime rate inspired a gritty TV drama. But a new study (Tinyurl.com/TreeCrimeReport) by the University of Vermont’s Transportation Research Center, in Burlington, found that a 10 percent increase in trees in a given area led to a 12 percent decrease in crime. “It’s really pretty striking how strong this relationship is,” says Austin Troy, lead author of the study, published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning.

Researchers examined the correlation in and around Baltimore using aggregated crime data and combining it with high-resolution satellite images to conduct the analysis. The working hypothesis is that because people enjoy spending time in pleasant outdoor spaces, there are more observers present to hinder criminal activity. Also, a well-maintained landscape seems to send a message that someone may be watching.

To avoid culture bias, the study considered many socioeconomic factors, including housing, age, income and race of residents, as well as variables such as rural versus city setting and population density. The findings should prove helpful to urban planners.

NativeFringeTreeLousiana-500x333Fringetrees are excellent anywhere that a very small tree is needed, such as near a patio, in small yards, or under power lines. Like many white-flowered plants, they look especially nice planted in front of a dark backdrop. They can be used as individual specimens, in groups, in mixed shrub borders or in natural gardens. They are well suited to urban plantings due to pollution tolerance and adaptability to varied soils. Fringetrees are not salt tolerant.

Although fringetrees are adaptable and will grow in most soil types, they prefer moist, deep, well-drained, acidic soils. They grow well in full sun to partial shade. Leaf appearance is best in some shade, but flowering is heaviest in full sun. The ideal compromise would be sun through most of the day, but shade during hot afternoon hours. Fringetrees have low maintenance needs once established.

Due to a naturally strong branch structure fringetrees rarely need pruning. Pruning while young may be desirable if a single stem tree form is preferred. Fringetrees do not transplant well so take care to choose an appropriate permanent location and use proper planting methods. Plant it high, it won’t die!

Plant it Low, It Won’t Grow | Plant it High, It Won’t Die

The most important consideration in planting trees and shrubs is the planting depth. Don’t plant too deep!
Plant all trees and shrubs about one inch above the surface of the existing soil. No dirt should be placed on top of the existing roots and nursery soil so as to not smother the root system. Mulch well, leaving a two inch gap around the caliper(s) of the plant.

For the most efficient use of water, construct an earthen berm two to three inches high around the drip zone area of the plant after planting. Water in well after planting!

TREES TO PLANT IN NEW ORLEANS

choose-tree

Click here for the original article.

CRIME WAVE HITS AREA

Posted in CRIME with tags , , , on January 25, 2017 by katrinafilm

Monday, January 23, 2017 was a sad day for the neighborhood. Three major crimes were reported on the same day in this normally quiet area.

NOLA.com reported that authorities found “what appeared to be a stocking tied tightly” around the neck of a woman whose body was pulled from Bayou St. John on Monday, January 23, 2017. The woman, possibly in her 40s, was discovered in the water near the 4000 block of Davey Street, police said. The investigation was initially called an “unclassified death” by police, but has since been listed as a homicide. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to homicide detective Barrett Morton at 504-658-5300, or Crimestoppers at 504-822-1111.


click on the photo for a larger view
Monday night, a neighbor on Crete Street found their truck missing as they attempted to use it to get to work the next morning.
Description of vehicle involved from the owner – Color: Black, Make: GMC, Model: Sierra, Year: 2003, Type: Truck, Other details: Crete Street near Desoto /Esplanade.


The owner also said the plate is a Saints Super Bowl license plate with the following numbers 27863. Faubourg St. John neighbor Doug Dunn owns the truck. Doug can be reached at 504-400-1148. The officer covering the case is Officer Eymard. Officer Eymard can be reached by phone at 504-658-5292 or by email at cleymard@cityofno.com.


CLICK ON THE PHOTO FOR A LARGER VIEW

As a precautionary measure, take a couple of photos of your vehicle along with a photo of the license plate then keep it somewhere safe just in case.


click on the photo for a larger view
Also in the 1500 block of Crete Street on Monday, January 23, 2017, Tommy Lewis reported that a neighbor found the wheels missing from their vehicle.

If you feel uneasy about getting from your car to your home, why not have the Fair Grounds Patrol meet you there?

Have a gut feeling something isn’t right? Don’t second guess yourself,
call the Fair Grounds Patrol.

Call (504) 251-0276 or (504) 251-0111 and the Fair Grounds Patrol will meet you at your home to make sure you get in safely.

Enhanced NOPD Patrol

Mobile phone numbers of Enhanced Patrol officers:

(504) 251-0276
(504) 251-0111

As part of the ordinance allowing the New Orleans Fair Grounds to expand their operations to allow for slot machines the Fair Grounds is required to fund enhanced NOPD patrols in areas surrounding their facility. The patrol consists of two patrol cars operating 24 hours per day 7 days a week. The officers in the cars will have mobile phones and can be contacted directly by residents in the patrol area. The patrol area is defined as the area bounded by Desaix Boulevard to Moss Street to Ursulines Avenue to North Broad Avenue to St. Bernard Avenue to Desaix Boulevard.

Captain Scott, who leads the Fair Grounds Patrol says,
“The Fair Grounds patrol really helps to keep this area safer than non patrolled areas.”
Auto thefts top the list. Capt. Scott reminds everyone to please lock their vehicle’s doors.

The Fair Ground enhanced patrol began August 19th 2007.

Mobile phone numbers of Enhanced Patrol officers:

(504) 251-0276
(504) 251-0111

Please keep in mind that this patrol is in addition to regular police patrols. We should still call 911 in case of emergencies. After calling 911 it might make sense to call one of the numbers above.


Map of the Enchanced Patrol Area:

FairGroundsPatrolMap

Simple Crime Fighting Tips

Please use these tips to eliminate the opportunity for a crime in your home or on your street.

• Light Places Discourage Crime/Dark Places Encourage Crime: Leave a light on at your front and back door all night. Set timers on lights when you are away. Remove dead limbs and bushes from in front of windows. Report all street lights out as soon as you notice them. Call 311, and remember to get a service request number. When you call, give the pole number and the address of the house closest to the pole.

• Make sure you have your house number close to the front and back doors of your house.
Dark numbers on light trim are easiest to read. During an emergency, this could save precious moments.

• Install a peep hole in your exterior doors if you do not have glass around the door. NEVER open the door to a stranger. Call 911 if you are suspicious of a caller.

• Add deadbolt locks to all of your doors, particularly those with glass near the doorknob. Remove the key from the lock. If you want to keep a key close to the door for emergencies, make sure it is not reachable from the glass panels in the door.

• Make sure to notify your neighbors when you are going to be away. Set timers on both indoor and outdoor lights. Arrange for papers, mail and flyers to be taken in, and ask neighbors to place some trash in your super can and wheel it to the alley on trash day. Arrange for the lawn to be mowed while you are away. These simple steps can greatly reduce your chances of becoming the next burglary victim.

• If you have alarm systems in your car and home, use them. If you have an alarm system in your home, and you have a skylight, make sure to have the skylight wired to the alarm system. This is a new way of entering homes without being detected.

• Leave your emergency numbers with a neighbor, and leave a copy by the kitchen phone, if you have one.

• Do not leave lawn mowers, bicycles or baby strollers in the yard unattended. • NEVER leave your purse in a shopping cart at the market, in your desk at work unattended, or on the back of your chair in public. Not only will your money and credit cards be used, but you could loose your personal identity. Personal identity theft is the fastest growing crime in our area.

• Shred all documents that contain any personal information about you or your family members (bank statements, credit card receipts, etc.) to avoid being a victim of Identity Theft.

• Never take valuables to the Gym with you. Even lockers that are locked can be the scene of a theft.

• Check your surroundings before getting out of your car on your way into the house, and out of the house on your way into your car.

• Remove all valuables from sight in your car, especially GPS, iPods, CDs, cameras, laptops, purses and money. If you must leave something in your car, store it in the trunk. When valet parking, leave only your car key.

• NEVER leave your car running without you in it. Besides inviting a car theft, it is also illegal.

• If you witness a crime, write down the details as soon as possible, and keep the paper in a safe place. It could mean the difference between a conviction and an acquittal. Call 911 and read from your sheet.

• Get to know your neighbors. If you know who belongs on your block, it is easier to spot someone who does not belong. Report suspicious behavior to the police. If you suspect it is a crime, call 911. Use the words “Possible Crime in Progress.” Get involved in your community. Apathy is the partner of crime.

TAKE A TOUR OF FAUBOURG ST. JOHN

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Living Well, Magical Mystery Tour with tags , , , , , , on January 18, 2017 by katrinafilm


Capture New Orleans from a different perspective. Kayak on Bayou St. John as we guide you along our historic waterway running through the city. We’ll keep with the pace of the city—nice and easy, taking in the southern scenery, hospitality and weather.

The bayou itself was a key component in establishing our city. The Native Americans showed early explorers (Iberville and his brother, Bienville) the bayou as a way to access, at the time, a potential future city from the Gulf of Mexico without having to fight the Mississippi River’s strong currents. While kayaking, you will see some of the older city structures, like the Spanish Custom House and the Pitot House, both built in the late 1700’s. You might hear and catch a glimpse of the happenings at Fair Grounds Race Course, one of the oldest horse tracks in the United States, as well as the site of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. You will be paddling along side beautiful City Park, which houses centuries-old live oak trees. You’ll see New Orleans Museum of Art as you pass the grand entrance of the park. St. Louis Cemetery #3 will be visible from your kayak. The elaborate above-ground tombs are pretty spectacular.

There is plenty of wildlife to observe. It isn’t uncommon to spot a blue herring perched on an old piling or a pelican diving into the water after a fish. At sunrise or dusk you might notice one or 15 of the notorious nocturnal nutria venturing out for a swim and a snack.

Bayou St. John flows through many thriving neighborhoods. You’ll have the opportunity to observe (and maybe interact with) the other wildlife. Folks do all sorts of things on the banks of the bayou—exercise, play, picnic, tag, etc. You’ll certainly get a feel for New Orleans through the local community.

A variety of foliage surrounds Bayou St. John—cypress trees, oak trees, magnolia trees, crepe myrtles, etc. The locals living along the bayou build colorful festive gardens that can be seen while touring.

This experience will bring balance to many things: You’ll find nature in an urban setting, visit history in the present, have a few active hours among several decadent ones, and feel local while vacationing.

Kayaking tours on historic Bayou St. John

Rent a kayak and paddle yourself into paradise!

Take a walking tour of the area!

Rachel Dangermond submitted the information below:

City Park and Bayou St. John
The intersection of Esplanade Ave. at Bayou St. John and
City Park Ave. is one of the points of higher elevation in the
city. Bayou Metairie flowed into Bayou St. John here. Bienville
is supposed to have found the Indian village of Tchou-Tchouma
in 1718 where the Esplanade Ave. bridge is now located. In the
18th and 19th centuries Bayou St. John provided an important
second water route to the city. The mouth of the bayou at
Lake Pontchartrain was protected by a fort built by the Spanish.

Ocean going vessels were able to travel as far as the present
end of the bayou. From this point goods were carried to and
from the city by portage during the 18th century along Bayou
Road. In 1805, a canal was dug, following an earlier canal by
Spanish governor Carondelet, which brought the ships to a
turning basin just behind what is now the Municipal Auditorium
at Basin St.

Statue of Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard
(May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was a Louisiana-born
American author, civil servant, politician, inventor, and the first
prominent general for the Confederate States Army during the
American Civil War. Beauregard was trained as a civil engineer
at the United States Military Academy and served with
distinction as an engineer in the Mexican-American War.

His arguably greatest achievement was saving the city of
Petersburg, Virginia, and thus also the Confederate capital of
Richmond, from assaults by overwhelmingly superior Union
Army forces in June 1864. However, his influence over
Confederate strategy was marred by his poor professional
relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior
generals and officials. In April 1865, Beauregard and his
commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis
and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to
end. Johnston surrendered most of the remaining armies of
the Confederacy to Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, including
Beauregard and his men.

Following his military career, Beauregard served as a railroad
executive and became one of the few wealthy Confederate
veterans because of his role in promoting the Louisiana
Lottery. Today he is commonly referred to as P.G.T.
Beauregard, but during the war he rarely used his first name
and signed correspondence as G.T. Beauregard. Nicknames
were The Little Creole, The Little Napoleon, Bory, Felix

Place of birth: St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana ontreras”
sugar-cane plantation in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana,
about 20 miles (32 km) outside New Orleans, to a white
Creole family, the third child of Jacques Toutant-Beauregard
and Helene Judith de Reggio Toutant-Beauregard. He had
three brothers and three sisters. Beauregard attended
New Orleans schools and then went to a “French school” in
New York City. It was during his four years in New York,
beginning at age 12 that he first learned to speak English.
He trained at the United States Military Academy at West
Point, New York. One of his instructors was Robert Anderson,
who would later become the commander of Fort Sumter and
surrender to Beauregard at the start of the Civil War.

In 1841, Beauregard married Marie Laure Villeré, the daughter
of Jules Villeré, a sugar planter in Plaquemines Parish and a member
of one of the most prominent Creole families in
southern Louisiana.

Marie was a paternal granddaughter of Jacques Villeré, the
second governor of Louisiana. The couple had three children: René,
Henri, and Laure. Marie died in March 1850, while giving
birth to Laure.

Ten years later, the widower Beauregard married Caroline Deslonde,
the daughter of André Deslonde, a sugar planter
from St. James Parish. Caroline was a sister-in-law of John
Slidell, a U.S. senator from Louisiana and later a Confederate diplomat.
She died in Union-occupied New Orleans in March
1864. They had no children together.

On first meeting, most people were struck by [Beauregard’s] “foreign”
appearance. His skin was smooth and olive-
complexioned. His eyes, half-lidded, were dark, with a trace
of Gallic melancholy about them.

His hair was black (though by 1860 he maintained this hue
with dye). He was strikingly handsome and enjoyed the
attentions of women, but probably not excessively or illicitly.
He sported a dark mustache and goatee, and he rather
resembled Napoleon III, then ruler of France—although he
often saw himself in the mold of the more celebrated
Napoleon Bonaparte.

Place of death: New Orleans, Louisiana and was buried in the Tomb
of the Army of Tennessee, Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans

City Park is a beautiful and well maintained
urban park, the largest in the city and fifth largest municipal
park in the United States and, at this writing, is reported to
be one of the safest. In 1854, the first section of the park
was acquired by the city. This tract of land, fronting on
Bayou St. John and present City Park Ave., was part of the
Allard Plantation. The first improvements to the park were
made in the 1890’s. The park is laced with lagoons (the
lagoons along City Park Ave. are part of old Bayou Metairie,
seven miles of them which contain bass and bream), and
trees typical of the region such as magnolias and live oaks
(the dueling oaks are named for the duels that were supposed
to have taken place from 1804 to 1830).

The amusement park area has a fine old carousel dating from
1904. The Casino, dating from about 1914
is the center for information, rentals, and refreshments
(domed band shell and Beaux Art style pavilion were built in
the 30’s). The park has three 18-hole golf courses. Major restorations
and all of the paving of roadways, construction of bridges, drainage
and other improvements in a large area of the park were done under
WPA in the late 30’s.

copy of the Pitot Housec. 1940
800 Moss Street
A modern Pitot House (see 1440 Moss Street) facsimile. One
of the original Pitot House mantels still survives in the newer residence.

Louis Blanc Housec. 1798
924 Moss Street
Formerly the plantation and home Louis Antonio Blanc. The
second story gallery has slender colonnettes and the
French window, jalousies and steep roof are characteristic of
Louisiana colonial plantation houses; similar to Parlange
and Homeplace Plantations elsewhere in the state.

Spanish Custom Housec. 1784
1300 Moss Street
A small-scale typical Louisiana Plantation hose. Various
reasons have been given for the name of the so-called
“Custom House” although there is no real tradition that it
ever functioned in this manner. Probably built for Don
Santiago Lloreins when the land formed part of his
plantation.

Evariste Blanc House
(Holy Rosary Rectory)
c. 1834
1342 Moss Street
Some Greek Revival alterations have been made in this
Bayou St. John plantation house, although evidence of an
earlier style including slender colonnettes and round arched
doors, is plainly visible.

Cabrini High School1964 – 1965
1400 Moss Street

Morel-Wisner House
c. 1850’s
1347 Moss Street
Mid-19th century, possibly constructed as a residence
for the attorney Christoval Morel in the late 1840’s after
he purchased a large tract of land on the Bayou St. John
in 1847. The house served as New Orleans’ first Fencing
Club in the 1880’s and one time as a rowing club. From
1935 until her death the house served as the home of Dr.
Elizabeth Wisner, an original member of the faculty and later
the dean of the School of Social Work at Tulane University.

Christoval Morel’s father, Pierre L. Morel dueled under the
oaks in City Park while his wife (Victorine de Armas) was
pregnant with Christoval. The Duelling Oaks in City Park
have seen some of the most colorful scenes in New Orleans’ history.
For years sword clanged against sword and bullets streaked between
the ancient trees.

An article in the Times-Democrat, March 13, 1892, said,
“Blood has been shed under the old cathedral aisles of
nature. Between 1834 and 1844 scarcely a day passed
without duels being fought at the Oaks. Why, it would not be strange
if the very violets blossomed red of this soaked grass!
The lover for his mistress, the gentleman for his honor, the courtier for
his King; what loyalty has not cried out in pistol
shot and scratch of steel! Sometimes two or three hundred
people hurried from the city to witness these human baitings.
On the occasion of one duel the spectators could stand no
more, drew their swords, and there was a general melee.”

In early Creole days more duels were fought in New Orleans
than any other American city. Creole honor was a thing of intricate delicacy,
to be offended by a word or glance. The Duelling Oaks were a favorite setting
for these affaires d’honneur, with pistol, saber,
or colichemarde, a long sword with a broad forte and very
slender foible, a favorite duelling weapon since the
seventeenth century.

Creoles were expert swordsmen and often delighted in any
and every opportunity to exhibit their art. Duels were fought
over real and trivial insults, were sometimes deliberately
provoked by young men anxious to display their skill. A quarrel between rival lovers,
a fancied slight, a political argument, a difference of opinion regarding an opera,
any one of these things was ample excuse for a duel under the oaks. In his
History of Louisiana, Alcee Fortier states that on one Sunday
in 1839 ten duels were fought here.

In 1855 the police began to enforce the laws against duelling,
but it continued surreptitiously for many years, despite
frequent arrests and prosecutions. Finally, however, the law
began to have some effect and there seems to have arisen a simultaneous
loss of interest in the affairs. At last the time
came when a man challenged to defend his honor with the
sword or pistol, suffered no stigma by refusing an invitation
to the Oaks. By 1890 duelling was only history.

The house is a frame one and a half story Greek Revival style structure raised
off the ground on six-foot-high piles. The large half story created by the gabled
roof is broken by two fine dormers on the Bayou St. John façade. The roof which
extends outward to form a gallery across the bayou façade
is supported by six square wooden columns resting on the
brick piers below.

The entrance façade is five bays wide with the front door
placed at the center. The façade is covered with ship-lap
siding while ordinary weatherboards cover the solid brick
exterior walls. The rear, which once contained a gallery and
two cabinets, has been converted to a kitchen/den/breakfast area.

The house is very similar to raised houses in the Bayou-
Lafourche area. However, by the 1840’s the traditional
Creole plan with no hall had been replaced with the
increasingly popular center hall plan favored by Americans.
As such, this house is an important example of two
different building styles. Morel house is a New Orleans
landmark. New Orleans Designated Landmarks

Pitot House
c. 1796 – 1799
1440 Moss Street (Formerly 1370 Moss Street)
In 1964 as a result of a trade with Cabrini High School
the Pitot House, threatened with demolition, was moved
about 200 feet and is now located in a corner of the
Desmare Playground. It is another fine Moss Street example
of the Louisiana plantation house on a fairly small scale.
While the upper part of the present structure is totally
original, some of the older brick columns were either re-used
or rebuilt after the move. Restored under the auspices of the
Louisiana Landmarks Society. Open Thursday 11 am – 4 pm.

Musgrove-Wilkinson Housec. 1850’s
1454 Moss Street
A large, extremely simple Greek Revival residence, with wide central
hall and plain interior mouldings.

New Orleans Museum of Art1911
City Park
1971 Additions: Stern Auditorium, Wisner Educational Wing
and City Wing – August Perez & Associates, Architects and
Arthur Feitel, Consulting Architect.

The Degas House
Historic Home,
Courtyard & Inn
 2306 Esplanade Avenue 
New Orleans,
Louisiana 70119 
(504) 821-5009 
www.degashouse.com

PLEASE LEAVE US WITH GREAT MEMORIES OF YOUR VISIT

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Living Well with tags , , , , , , , on January 18, 2017 by katrinafilm

Welcome!
We hope you leave us with great memories of your visit.

cropped-cropped-bayoustjohn-940-header.jpg
Regardless of whether you live in Faubourg St. John or are a visitor,  everyone is glad you are here. Faubourg St. John has one of the best reputations in New Orleans as a community that cares.

vincamajorFaubourg St. John loves visitors. In Faubourg St. John, you get a unique, extraordinary experience. Faubourg St. John gives visitors an authentic, high-quality New Orlean experience that you will remember for a long time.

Jazz Fest, Bayou Boogaloo, and the Voodoo Experience are premier festivals that draw people from around the world because of the great fun the festivals provide. Bayou St. John is a beautiful inland waterway where you can rent a kayak to explore yourself or get a kayak tour and learn lots of great things about New Orleans.

Fortier Park, located in the 3200 block of Esplanade, offers natural beauty and modern art in a restful space. The park was redeveloped and is maintained by Faubourg St. John residents.

Fortier Park is just across from Faubourg St. Johns central business district where you can visit with local people running local businesses. Top rated restaurants, a day spa, a coffee shop and two great local grocery stores are all waiting for you to experience.

Take a short bike ride down Esplanade to Broad and Bayou Road and you’ll find even more unique shops and great local folks waiting to serve you.

City Park is a short walk from Faubourg St. John where you’ll find the New Orleans Museum of Art, Morning Call (coffee and beignets!), Storyland (rides and fun for the kids), and City Putt (minature golf for all ages). City Park is one of the largest urban parks in America.

On your way to City Park, on Esplanade Avenue, stop by St. Louis Cemetary #3 where you can see the beautiful above-ground tombs.

bayoustjohn-magnoliabridge-1937PITOT HOUSEFaubourg St. John is also home to the Pitot House at 1440 Moss Street. It’s where the first mayor of incorporated New Orleans lived. It’s nestled along Bayou St. John and across from the Magnolia Bridge.

Faubourg St. John is just a mile from the world famous French Quarter with bus and streetcar service to interesting places all around New Orleans.

Information below courtesy Rachel Dangermond:

City Park and Bayou St. John
The intersection of Esplanade Ave. at Bayou St. John and City Park Ave. is one of the points of higher elevation in the city. Bayou Metairie flowed into Bayou St. John here. Bienville is supposed to have found the Indian village of Tchou-Tchouma in 1718 where the Esplanade Ave. bridge is now located. In the 18th and 19th centuries Bayou St. John provided an important second water route to the city. The mouth of the bayou at Lake Pontchartrain was protected by a fort built by the Spanish.

Ocean going vessels were able to travel as far as the present end of the bayou. From this point goods were carried to and from the city by portage during the 18th century along Bayou Road. In 1805, a canal was dug, following an earlier canal by Spanish governor Carondelet, which brought the ships to a turning basin just behind what is now the Municipal Auditorium at Basin St.

Statue of Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard
(May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was a Louisiana-born American author, civil servant, politician, inventor, and the first prominent general for the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. Beauregard was trained as a civil engineer at the United States Military Academy and served with distinction as an engineer in the Mexican-American War.

His arguably greatest achievement was saving the city of Petersburg, Virginia, and thus also the Confederate capital of Richmond, from assaults by overwhelmingly superior Union Army forces in June 1864. However, his influence over Confederate strategy was marred by his poor professional relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior generals and officials. In April 1865, Beauregard and his commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to end. Johnston surrendered most of the remaining armies of the Confederacy to Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, including Beauregard and his men.

Following his military career, Beauregard served as a railroad executive and became one of the few wealthy Confederate veterans because of his role in promoting the Louisiana Lottery. Today he is commonly referred to as P.G.T. Beauregard, but during the war he rarely used his first name and signed correspondence as G.T. Beauregard. Nicknames were The Little Creole, The Little Napoleon, Bory, Felix

Place of birth: St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana ontreras” sugar-cane plantation in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, about 20 miles (32 km) outside New Orleans, to a white Creole family, the third child of Jacques Toutant-Beauregard and Helene Judith de Reggio Toutant-Beauregard. He had three brothers and three sisters. Beauregard attended New Orleans schools and then went to a “French school” in New York City. It was during his four years in New York, beginning at age 12 that he first learned to speak English. He trained at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. One of his instructors was Robert Anderson, who would later become the commander of Fort Sumter and surrender to Beauregard at the start of the Civil War.

In 1841, Beauregard married Marie Laure Villeré, the daughter of Jules Villeré, a sugar planter in Plaquemines Parish and a member of one of the most prominent Creole families in southern Louisiana.

Marie was a paternal granddaughter of Jacques Villeré, the second governor of Louisiana. The couple had three children: René, Henri, and Laure. Marie died in March 1850, while giving birth to Laure.

Ten years later, the widower Beauregard married Caroline Deslonde, the daughter of André Deslonde, a sugar planter from St. James Parish. Caroline was a sister-in-law of John
Slidell, a U.S. senator from Louisiana and later a Confederate diplomat. She died in Union-occupied New Orleans in March 1864. They had no children together.

On first meeting, most people were struck by [Beauregard’s] “foreign” appearance. His skin was smooth and olive-complexioned. His eyes, half-lidded, were dark, with a trace of Gallic melancholy about them.

His hair was black (though by 1860 he maintained this hue with dye). He was strikingly handsome and enjoyed the attentions of women, but probably not excessively or illicitly.
He sported a dark mustache and goatee, and he rather resembled Napoleon III, then ruler of France—although he often saw himself in the mold of the more celebrated Napoleon Bonaparte.

Place of death: New Orleans, Louisiana and was buried in the Tomb of the Army of Tennessee, Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans

City Park is a beautiful and well maintained urban park, the largest in the city and fifth largest municipal park in the United States and, at this writing, is reported to be one of the safest. In 1854, the first section of the park was acquired by the city. This tract of land, fronting on Bayou St. John and present City Park Ave., was part of the Allard Plantation. The first improvements to the park were made in the 1890’s. The park is laced with lagoons (the lagoons along City Park Ave. are part of old Bayou Metairie, seven miles of them which contain bass and bream), and trees typical of the region such as magnolias and live oaks
(the dueling oaks are named for the duels that were supposed to have taken place from 1804 to 1830).

The amusement park area has a fine old carousel dating from 1904. The Casino, dating from about 1914 is the center for information, rentals, and refreshments (coffee and beignets!) (domed band shell and Beaux Art style pavilion were built in the 30’s). The park has three 18-hole golf courses. Major restorations and all of the paving of roadways, construction of bridges, drainage and other improvements in a large area of the park were done under WPA in the late 30’s.

copy of the Pitot Housec. 1940
800 Moss Street
A modern Pitot House (see 1440 Moss Street) facsimile. One of the original Pitot House mantels still survives in the newer residence.

Louis Blanc Housec. 1798
924 Moss Street
Formerly the plantation and home Louis Antonio Blanc. The second story gallery has slender colonnettes and the French window, jalousies and steep roof are characteristic of
Louisiana colonial plantation houses; similar to Parlange and Homeplace Plantations elsewhere in the state.

Spanish Custom Housec. 1784
1300 Moss Street
A small-scale typical Louisiana Plantation hose. Various reasons have been given for the name of the so-called “Custom House” although there is no real tradition that it ever functioned in this manner. Probably built for Don Santiago Lloreins when the land formed part of his plantation.

Evariste Blanc House
(Holy Rosary Rectory)
c. 1834
1342 Moss Street
Some Greek Revival alterations have been made in this Bayou St. John plantation house, although evidence of an earlier style including slender colonnettes and round arched doors, is plainly visible.

Cabrini High School1964 – 1965
1400 Moss Street

Morel-Wisner House
c. 1850’s
1347 Moss Street
Mid-19th century, possibly constructed as a residence for the attorney Christoval Morel in the late 1840’s after he purchased a large tract of land on the Bayou St. John in 1847. The house served as New Orleans’ first Fencing Club in the 1880’s and one time as a rowing club. From
1935 until her death the house served as the home of Dr. Elizabeth Wisner, an original member of the faculty and later the dean of the School of Social Work at Tulane University.

Christoval Morel’s father, Pierre L. Morel dueled under the oaks in City Park while his wife (Victorine de Armas) was pregnant with Christoval. The Duelling Oaks in City Park have seen some of the most colorful scenes in New Orleans’ history. For years sword clanged against sword and bullets streaked between the ancient trees.

An article in the Times-Democrat, March 13, 1892, said, “Blood has been shed under the old cathedral aisles of nature. Between 1834 and 1844 scarcely a day passed without duels being fought at the Oaks. Why, it would not be strange if the very violets blossomed red of this soaked grass! The lover for his mistress, the gentleman for his honor, the courtier for his King; what loyalty has not cried out in pistol shot and scratch of steel! Sometimes two or three hundred people hurried from the city to witness these human baitings. On the occasion of one duel the spectators could stand no more, drew their swords, and there was a general melee.”

In early Creole days more duels were fought in New Orleans than any other American city. Creole honor was a thing of intricate delicacy, to be offended by a word or glance. The Duelling Oaks were a favorite setting for these affaires d’honneur, with pistol, saber, or colichemarde, a long sword with a broad forte and very slender foible, a favorite duelling weapon since the seventeenth century.

Creoles were expert swordsmen and often delighted in any and every opportunity to exhibit their art. Duels were fought over real and trivial insults, were sometimes deliberately
provoked by young men anxious to display their skill. A quarrel between rival lovers, a fancied slight, a political argument, a difference of opinion regarding an opera, any one of these things was ample excuse for a duel under the oaks. In his History of Louisiana, Alcee Fortier states that on one Sunday in 1839 ten duels were fought here.

In 1855 the police began to enforce the laws against duelling, but it continued surreptitiously for many years, despite frequent arrests and prosecutions. Finally, however, the law began to have some effect and there seems to have arisen a simultaneous loss of interest in the affairs. At last the time came when a man challenged to defend his honor with the sword or pistol, suffered no stigma by refusing an invitation to the Oaks. By 1890 duelling was only history.

The house is a frame one and a half story Greek Revival style structure raised off the ground on six-foot-high piles. The large half story created by the gabled roof is broken by two fine dormers on the Bayou St. John façade. The roof which extends outward to form a gallery across the bayou façade is supported by six square wooden columns resting on the brick piers below.

The entrance façade is five bays wide with the front door placed at the center. The façade is covered with ship-lap siding while ordinary weatherboards cover the solid brick exterior walls. The rear, which once contained a gallery and two cabinets, has been converted to a kitchen/den/breakfast area.

The house is very similar to raised houses in the Bayou-Lafourche area. However, by the 1840’s the traditional Creole plan with no hall had been replaced with the increasingly popular center hall plan favored by Americans. As such, this house is an important example of two different building styles. Morel house is a New Orleans landmark.

Pitot House
c. 1796 – 1799
1440 Moss Street (Formerly 1370 Moss Street) In 1964 as a result of a trade with Cabrini High School the Pitot House, threatened with demolition, was moved about 200 feet and is now located in a corner of the Desmare Playground. It is another fine Moss Street example of the Louisiana plantation house on a fairly small scale. While the upper part of the present structure is totally original, some of the older brick columns were either re-used or rebuilt after the move. Restored under the auspices of the Louisiana Landmarks Society. Open Thursday 11 am – 4 pm.

Musgrove-Wilkinson Housec. 1850’s
1454 Moss Street
A large, extremely simple Greek Revival residence, with wide central hall and plain interior mouldings.

New Orleans Museum of Art
1911 City Park
1971 Additions: Stern Auditorium, Wisner Educational Wing and City Wing – August Perez & Associates, Architects and Arthur Feitel, Consulting Architect.

The Degas House 
Historic Home,
Courtyard & Inn
 2306 Esplanade Avenue 
New Orleans, Louisiana 70119 
(504) 821-5009 
www.degashouse.com

jazzfestassholesWe love the folks who visit Faubourg St. John. However, there are some visitors who drink a bit too much and forget their manners. If you wouldn’t do it at your momma’s house, please don’t do it here.

For your safety, please consider checking out some of the information below:

Stash cash, credit cards and any currency.
Don’t make yourself vulnerable.
Work that cellphone.
Carry makeshift self defense weapons.
Identify safe places and people.

Please visit the link below for more:
http://www.axs.com/tips-to-stay-safe-at-new-orleans-jazz-heritage-festival-jazz-fest-safe-51357

Assume people driving cars do not see you. Drivers may be drunk, tired and sunburned; don’t expect that the drivers see the red light, let alone the periodic Jazz Fest reveler jumping out in the middle of the street.

Beware of bikers. A good rule of thumb is to treat a bike like a car. If you see one coming, don’t think you can run across the street right in front of it. Bikers will come upon you faster and be much slower at stopping than you think.

When walking from Jazz Fest to the location of your post-festing-party, remember that you may be traveling through potentially dangerous areas. Do not walk alone, know where you’re going and be aware of your surroundings.

Do not forget to hydrate! Dehydration can make people disoriented and alcohol adds fuel to the dehydration fire. I cannot count the number of Jazz Fest partiers I have seen take a spill due to too much alcohol and too little water. Don’t look like an amateur, drink lots of water!

More information in the link below:
http://www.morrisbart.com/pedestrian-safety-at-new-orleans-jazz-fest/

New Orleans weather is unpredictable and the Fair Grounds tend to be muddy, so bring lawn chairs, an umbrella, and garbage bags, which double as a raincoat and a dry place to sit. The Louisiana heat can be unforgiving, so pack your sunscreen and a hat too.

Do not forget toilet tissue, as you are sharing those port-o-potties with 400,000 others.

To avoid the heavy crowds, walk on the circular horse racing track around the perimeter of the Fair Grounds, and venture out to the grandstands for food demonstrations, art installations, shade and clean restrooms.

More information in the link below:
http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2012/02/13/new-orleans-jazz-fest-for-beginners/

Venture Beyond the Headliners
Absolutely Do Not Get Behind the Wheel
Come hungry
Linger in Mid-City
Indulge Intelligently
Don’t Miss NOLA by Night
Go for the Double

More information in the link below:
http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2015/04/7-survival-tips-new-orleans-jazz-heritage-festival.html

To ensure proper safety and preparation, please read the following rules and policies:

All persons and bags are subject to search

• Single, collapsible folding chairs (NO foot rests, side tables) and small folding
blankets are permitted.
• Wheelchairs permitted. Strollers for children permitted.
• NO FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY.
• NO tents or shades of any fashion.
• NO bicycles or other wheeled personal transport devices allowed on the
grounds or infield.
• NO flashing devices of any kind.
NO unauthorized vending.
• NO weapons, illicit drugs, contraband or fireworks.
• NO outside food, beverages or glass allowed.
• NO flag/kite-flying of any kind.
• NO Inflatables of any kind – this includes beach balls.
• NO pets.

Festival chairs and/or festival baggage are not allowed to be set-up anywhere in the
Grandstand, Paddock or Apron areas. They are only permitted on the Infield in certain areas.

All entrances and exits will be clearly marked for your safety.

fsj-bastille-2014Bayou St. John is the beautiful waterway that runs through Faubourg St. John.

We are so glad you are here.
Please leave no trace.

Bring yourself to the bayou.
Take your stuff home with you. ‪#‎leavenotrace‬

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Below is short explanation of what the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is about:

The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association (FSJNA), organized in 1977, is a benevolent group interested in continuing improvements in this historic New Orleans neighborhood through its people, children, historic waterway, public spaces and other environs.

FSJNA has participated in numerous beautification efforts throughout Faubourg St. John from Parks and Playgrounds to simple street plantings. A few examples of this are Desmare Playground, rebuilt by FSJNA in the early 90’s and beautified with tree plantings in 2008, the maintenance and care of Fortier Park, the beautification of the median on Esplanade Avenue and plantings along Bayou St. John. FSJNA worked in conjunction with KABOOM to restore the children’s’ play area at Stallings Playground, which was negatively impacted by Hurricane Katrina. After playground equipment was installed, FSJNA obtained a loan to purchase additionally needed rubberized safety tiles for the area. FSJNA also continues to apply for grants to support these activities. Our Keep Louisiana Beautiful grant allowed us to obtain benches and garbage cans for local parks.

FSJNA works to keep its membership informed. The http://FSJNA.org website (available to anyone) is a library of the events, benefits, and programs FSJNA provides. Additionally fsjna.com is a resource for paid members (dues are $10 per year) this is a “yahoo group” website where members can exchange ideas, get neighborhood information, and even get hurricane updates.

During previous hurricanes, this site was a welcome source of information from people who stayed in the neighborhood to those who evacuated. It can be very reassuring to know the status of your home when you are away. The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is also represented on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.   Faubourg St. John is also at NEXTDOOR.com… http://faubourgstjohn.nextdoor.com

No one in the organization gets paid. The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is an all volunteer organization where any donations or membership dues go directly back into making Faubourg St. John the best neighborhood in New Orleans.

While zoning matters can be contentious, they are a necessary function of an involved neighborhood organization. FSJNA has successfully negotiated and worked with most of the neighborhood businesses to protect the quality of life and increase the appeal of the area for those businesses and residents through limiting traffic and noise pollution, helping with the elimination of blight and providing safer streets.

FSJNA also works with and reaches out to other non-profits and bordering neighborhood organizations by participating in area festivals, cultural events, community workshops and informational seminars. Future work will continue to focus on building partnerships with local non-profits and community organizations to help retain the historic character and positive quality of life we enjoy.