Archive for the Living Well Category

TAKE A TOUR OF FAUBOURG ST. JOHN

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Living Well, Magical Mystery Tour with tags , , , , , , on January 18, 2017 by katrinafilm


Capture New Orleans from a different perspective. Kayak on Bayou St. John as we guide you along our historic waterway running through the city. We’ll keep with the pace of the city—nice and easy, taking in the southern scenery, hospitality and weather.

The bayou itself was a key component in establishing our city. The Native Americans showed early explorers (Iberville and his brother, Bienville) the bayou as a way to access, at the time, a potential future city from the Gulf of Mexico without having to fight the Mississippi River’s strong currents. While kayaking, you will see some of the older city structures, like the Spanish Custom House and the Pitot House, both built in the late 1700’s. You might hear and catch a glimpse of the happenings at Fair Grounds Race Course, one of the oldest horse tracks in the United States, as well as the site of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. You will be paddling along side beautiful City Park, which houses centuries-old live oak trees. You’ll see New Orleans Museum of Art as you pass the grand entrance of the park. St. Louis Cemetery #3 will be visible from your kayak. The elaborate above-ground tombs are pretty spectacular.

There is plenty of wildlife to observe. It isn’t uncommon to spot a blue herring perched on an old piling or a pelican diving into the water after a fish. At sunrise or dusk you might notice one or 15 of the notorious nocturnal nutria venturing out for a swim and a snack.

Bayou St. John flows through many thriving neighborhoods. You’ll have the opportunity to observe (and maybe interact with) the other wildlife. Folks do all sorts of things on the banks of the bayou—exercise, play, picnic, tag, etc. You’ll certainly get a feel for New Orleans through the local community.

A variety of foliage surrounds Bayou St. John—cypress trees, oak trees, magnolia trees, crepe myrtles, etc. The locals living along the bayou build colorful festive gardens that can be seen while touring.

This experience will bring balance to many things: You’ll find nature in an urban setting, visit history in the present, have a few active hours among several decadent ones, and feel local while vacationing.

Kayaking tours on historic Bayou St. John

Rent a kayak and paddle yourself into paradise!

Take a walking tour of the area!

Rachel Dangermond submitted the information below:

City Park and Bayou St. John
The intersection of Esplanade Ave. at Bayou St. John and
City Park Ave. is one of the points of higher elevation in the
city. Bayou Metairie flowed into Bayou St. John here. Bienville
is supposed to have found the Indian village of Tchou-Tchouma
in 1718 where the Esplanade Ave. bridge is now located. In the
18th and 19th centuries Bayou St. John provided an important
second water route to the city. The mouth of the bayou at
Lake Pontchartrain was protected by a fort built by the Spanish.

Ocean going vessels were able to travel as far as the present
end of the bayou. From this point goods were carried to and
from the city by portage during the 18th century along Bayou
Road. In 1805, a canal was dug, following an earlier canal by
Spanish governor Carondelet, which brought the ships to a
turning basin just behind what is now the Municipal Auditorium
at Basin St.

Statue of Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard
(May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was a Louisiana-born
American author, civil servant, politician, inventor, and the first
prominent general for the Confederate States Army during the
American Civil War. Beauregard was trained as a civil engineer
at the United States Military Academy and served with
distinction as an engineer in the Mexican-American War.

His arguably greatest achievement was saving the city of
Petersburg, Virginia, and thus also the Confederate capital of
Richmond, from assaults by overwhelmingly superior Union
Army forces in June 1864. However, his influence over
Confederate strategy was marred by his poor professional
relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior
generals and officials. In April 1865, Beauregard and his
commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis
and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to
end. Johnston surrendered most of the remaining armies of
the Confederacy to Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, including
Beauregard and his men.

Following his military career, Beauregard served as a railroad
executive and became one of the few wealthy Confederate
veterans because of his role in promoting the Louisiana
Lottery. Today he is commonly referred to as P.G.T.
Beauregard, but during the war he rarely used his first name
and signed correspondence as G.T. Beauregard. Nicknames
were The Little Creole, The Little Napoleon, Bory, Felix

Place of birth: St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana ontreras”
sugar-cane plantation in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana,
about 20 miles (32 km) outside New Orleans, to a white
Creole family, the third child of Jacques Toutant-Beauregard
and Helene Judith de Reggio Toutant-Beauregard. He had
three brothers and three sisters. Beauregard attended
New Orleans schools and then went to a “French school” in
New York City. It was during his four years in New York,
beginning at age 12 that he first learned to speak English.
He trained at the United States Military Academy at West
Point, New York. One of his instructors was Robert Anderson,
who would later become the commander of Fort Sumter and
surrender to Beauregard at the start of the Civil War.

In 1841, Beauregard married Marie Laure Villeré, the daughter
of Jules Villeré, a sugar planter in Plaquemines Parish and a member
of one of the most prominent Creole families in
southern Louisiana.

Marie was a paternal granddaughter of Jacques Villeré, the
second governor of Louisiana. The couple had three children: René,
Henri, and Laure. Marie died in March 1850, while giving
birth to Laure.

Ten years later, the widower Beauregard married Caroline Deslonde,
the daughter of André Deslonde, a sugar planter
from St. James Parish. Caroline was a sister-in-law of John
Slidell, a U.S. senator from Louisiana and later a Confederate diplomat.
She died in Union-occupied New Orleans in March
1864. They had no children together.

On first meeting, most people were struck by [Beauregard’s] “foreign”
appearance. His skin was smooth and olive-
complexioned. His eyes, half-lidded, were dark, with a trace
of Gallic melancholy about them.

His hair was black (though by 1860 he maintained this hue
with dye). He was strikingly handsome and enjoyed the
attentions of women, but probably not excessively or illicitly.
He sported a dark mustache and goatee, and he rather
resembled Napoleon III, then ruler of France—although he
often saw himself in the mold of the more celebrated
Napoleon Bonaparte.

Place of death: New Orleans, Louisiana and was buried in the Tomb
of the Army of Tennessee, Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans

City Park is a beautiful and well maintained
urban park, the largest in the city and fifth largest municipal
park in the United States and, at this writing, is reported to
be one of the safest. In 1854, the first section of the park
was acquired by the city. This tract of land, fronting on
Bayou St. John and present City Park Ave., was part of the
Allard Plantation. The first improvements to the park were
made in the 1890’s. The park is laced with lagoons (the
lagoons along City Park Ave. are part of old Bayou Metairie,
seven miles of them which contain bass and bream), and
trees typical of the region such as magnolias and live oaks
(the dueling oaks are named for the duels that were supposed
to have taken place from 1804 to 1830).

The amusement park area has a fine old carousel dating from
1904. The Casino, dating from about 1914
is the center for information, rentals, and refreshments
(domed band shell and Beaux Art style pavilion were built in
the 30’s). The park has three 18-hole golf courses. Major restorations
and all of the paving of roadways, construction of bridges, drainage
and other improvements in a large area of the park were done under
WPA in the late 30’s.

copy of the Pitot Housec. 1940
800 Moss Street
A modern Pitot House (see 1440 Moss Street) facsimile. One
of the original Pitot House mantels still survives in the newer residence.

Louis Blanc Housec. 1798
924 Moss Street
Formerly the plantation and home Louis Antonio Blanc. The
second story gallery has slender colonnettes and the
French window, jalousies and steep roof are characteristic of
Louisiana colonial plantation houses; similar to Parlange
and Homeplace Plantations elsewhere in the state.

Spanish Custom Housec. 1784
1300 Moss Street
A small-scale typical Louisiana Plantation hose. Various
reasons have been given for the name of the so-called
“Custom House” although there is no real tradition that it
ever functioned in this manner. Probably built for Don
Santiago Lloreins when the land formed part of his
plantation.

Evariste Blanc House
(Holy Rosary Rectory)
c. 1834
1342 Moss Street
Some Greek Revival alterations have been made in this
Bayou St. John plantation house, although evidence of an
earlier style including slender colonnettes and round arched
doors, is plainly visible.

Cabrini High School1964 – 1965
1400 Moss Street

Morel-Wisner House
c. 1850’s
1347 Moss Street
Mid-19th century, possibly constructed as a residence
for the attorney Christoval Morel in the late 1840’s after
he purchased a large tract of land on the Bayou St. John
in 1847. The house served as New Orleans’ first Fencing
Club in the 1880’s and one time as a rowing club. From
1935 until her death the house served as the home of Dr.
Elizabeth Wisner, an original member of the faculty and later
the dean of the School of Social Work at Tulane University.

Christoval Morel’s father, Pierre L. Morel dueled under the
oaks in City Park while his wife (Victorine de Armas) was
pregnant with Christoval. The Duelling Oaks in City Park
have seen some of the most colorful scenes in New Orleans’ history.
For years sword clanged against sword and bullets streaked between
the ancient trees.

An article in the Times-Democrat, March 13, 1892, said,
“Blood has been shed under the old cathedral aisles of
nature. Between 1834 and 1844 scarcely a day passed
without duels being fought at the Oaks. Why, it would not be strange
if the very violets blossomed red of this soaked grass!
The lover for his mistress, the gentleman for his honor, the courtier for
his King; what loyalty has not cried out in pistol
shot and scratch of steel! Sometimes two or three hundred
people hurried from the city to witness these human baitings.
On the occasion of one duel the spectators could stand no
more, drew their swords, and there was a general melee.”

In early Creole days more duels were fought in New Orleans
than any other American city. Creole honor was a thing of intricate delicacy,
to be offended by a word or glance. The Duelling Oaks were a favorite setting
for these affaires d’honneur, with pistol, saber,
or colichemarde, a long sword with a broad forte and very
slender foible, a favorite duelling weapon since the
seventeenth century.

Creoles were expert swordsmen and often delighted in any
and every opportunity to exhibit their art. Duels were fought
over real and trivial insults, were sometimes deliberately
provoked by young men anxious to display their skill. A quarrel between rival lovers,
a fancied slight, a political argument, a difference of opinion regarding an opera,
any one of these things was ample excuse for a duel under the oaks. In his
History of Louisiana, Alcee Fortier states that on one Sunday
in 1839 ten duels were fought here.

In 1855 the police began to enforce the laws against duelling,
but it continued surreptitiously for many years, despite
frequent arrests and prosecutions. Finally, however, the law
began to have some effect and there seems to have arisen a simultaneous
loss of interest in the affairs. At last the time
came when a man challenged to defend his honor with the
sword or pistol, suffered no stigma by refusing an invitation
to the Oaks. By 1890 duelling was only history.

The house is a frame one and a half story Greek Revival style structure raised
off the ground on six-foot-high piles. The large half story created by the gabled
roof is broken by two fine dormers on the Bayou St. John façade. The roof which
extends outward to form a gallery across the bayou façade
is supported by six square wooden columns resting on the
brick piers below.

The entrance façade is five bays wide with the front door
placed at the center. The façade is covered with ship-lap
siding while ordinary weatherboards cover the solid brick
exterior walls. The rear, which once contained a gallery and
two cabinets, has been converted to a kitchen/den/breakfast area.

The house is very similar to raised houses in the Bayou-
Lafourche area. However, by the 1840’s the traditional
Creole plan with no hall had been replaced with the
increasingly popular center hall plan favored by Americans.
As such, this house is an important example of two
different building styles. Morel house is a New Orleans
landmark. New Orleans Designated Landmarks

Pitot House
c. 1796 – 1799
1440 Moss Street (Formerly 1370 Moss Street)
In 1964 as a result of a trade with Cabrini High School
the Pitot House, threatened with demolition, was moved
about 200 feet and is now located in a corner of the
Desmare Playground. It is another fine Moss Street example
of the Louisiana plantation house on a fairly small scale.
While the upper part of the present structure is totally
original, some of the older brick columns were either re-used
or rebuilt after the move. Restored under the auspices of the
Louisiana Landmarks Society. Open Thursday 11 am – 4 pm.

Musgrove-Wilkinson Housec. 1850’s
1454 Moss Street
A large, extremely simple Greek Revival residence, with wide central
hall and plain interior mouldings.

New Orleans Museum of Art1911
City Park
1971 Additions: Stern Auditorium, Wisner Educational Wing
and City Wing – August Perez & Associates, Architects and
Arthur Feitel, Consulting Architect.

The Degas House
Historic Home,
Courtyard & Inn
 2306 Esplanade Avenue 
New Orleans,
Louisiana 70119 
(504) 821-5009 
www.degashouse.com

PLEASE LEAVE US WITH GREAT MEMORIES OF YOUR VISIT

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Living Well with tags , , , , , , , on January 18, 2017 by katrinafilm

Welcome!
We hope you leave us with great memories of your visit.

cropped-cropped-bayoustjohn-940-header.jpg
Regardless of whether you live in Faubourg St. John or are a visitor,  everyone is glad you are here. Faubourg St. John has one of the best reputations in New Orleans as a community that cares.

vincamajorFaubourg St. John loves visitors. In Faubourg St. John, you get a unique, extraordinary experience. Faubourg St. John gives visitors an authentic, high-quality New Orlean experience that you will remember for a long time.

Jazz Fest, Bayou Boogaloo, and the Voodoo Experience are premier festivals that draw people from around the world because of the great fun the festivals provide. Bayou St. John is a beautiful inland waterway where you can rent a kayak to explore yourself or get a kayak tour and learn lots of great things about New Orleans.

Fortier Park, located in the 3200 block of Esplanade, offers natural beauty and modern art in a restful space. The park was redeveloped and is maintained by Faubourg St. John residents.

Fortier Park is just across from Faubourg St. Johns central business district where you can visit with local people running local businesses. Top rated restaurants, a day spa, a coffee shop and two great local grocery stores are all waiting for you to experience.

Take a short bike ride down Esplanade to Broad and Bayou Road and you’ll find even more unique shops and great local folks waiting to serve you.

City Park is a short walk from Faubourg St. John where you’ll find the New Orleans Museum of Art, Morning Call (coffee and beignets!), Storyland (rides and fun for the kids), and City Putt (minature golf for all ages). City Park is one of the largest urban parks in America.

On your way to City Park, on Esplanade Avenue, stop by St. Louis Cemetary #3 where you can see the beautiful above-ground tombs.

bayoustjohn-magnoliabridge-1937PITOT HOUSEFaubourg St. John is also home to the Pitot House at 1440 Moss Street. It’s where the first mayor of incorporated New Orleans lived. It’s nestled along Bayou St. John and across from the Magnolia Bridge.

Faubourg St. John is just a mile from the world famous French Quarter with bus and streetcar service to interesting places all around New Orleans.

Information below courtesy Rachel Dangermond:

City Park and Bayou St. John
The intersection of Esplanade Ave. at Bayou St. John and City Park Ave. is one of the points of higher elevation in the city. Bayou Metairie flowed into Bayou St. John here. Bienville is supposed to have found the Indian village of Tchou-Tchouma in 1718 where the Esplanade Ave. bridge is now located. In the 18th and 19th centuries Bayou St. John provided an important second water route to the city. The mouth of the bayou at Lake Pontchartrain was protected by a fort built by the Spanish.

Ocean going vessels were able to travel as far as the present end of the bayou. From this point goods were carried to and from the city by portage during the 18th century along Bayou Road. In 1805, a canal was dug, following an earlier canal by Spanish governor Carondelet, which brought the ships to a turning basin just behind what is now the Municipal Auditorium at Basin St.

Statue of Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard
(May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was a Louisiana-born American author, civil servant, politician, inventor, and the first prominent general for the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. Beauregard was trained as a civil engineer at the United States Military Academy and served with distinction as an engineer in the Mexican-American War.

His arguably greatest achievement was saving the city of Petersburg, Virginia, and thus also the Confederate capital of Richmond, from assaults by overwhelmingly superior Union Army forces in June 1864. However, his influence over Confederate strategy was marred by his poor professional relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior generals and officials. In April 1865, Beauregard and his commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to end. Johnston surrendered most of the remaining armies of the Confederacy to Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, including Beauregard and his men.

Following his military career, Beauregard served as a railroad executive and became one of the few wealthy Confederate veterans because of his role in promoting the Louisiana Lottery. Today he is commonly referred to as P.G.T. Beauregard, but during the war he rarely used his first name and signed correspondence as G.T. Beauregard. Nicknames were The Little Creole, The Little Napoleon, Bory, Felix

Place of birth: St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana ontreras” sugar-cane plantation in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, about 20 miles (32 km) outside New Orleans, to a white Creole family, the third child of Jacques Toutant-Beauregard and Helene Judith de Reggio Toutant-Beauregard. He had three brothers and three sisters. Beauregard attended New Orleans schools and then went to a “French school” in New York City. It was during his four years in New York, beginning at age 12 that he first learned to speak English. He trained at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. One of his instructors was Robert Anderson, who would later become the commander of Fort Sumter and surrender to Beauregard at the start of the Civil War.

In 1841, Beauregard married Marie Laure Villeré, the daughter of Jules Villeré, a sugar planter in Plaquemines Parish and a member of one of the most prominent Creole families in southern Louisiana.

Marie was a paternal granddaughter of Jacques Villeré, the second governor of Louisiana. The couple had three children: René, Henri, and Laure. Marie died in March 1850, while giving birth to Laure.

Ten years later, the widower Beauregard married Caroline Deslonde, the daughter of André Deslonde, a sugar planter from St. James Parish. Caroline was a sister-in-law of John
Slidell, a U.S. senator from Louisiana and later a Confederate diplomat. She died in Union-occupied New Orleans in March 1864. They had no children together.

On first meeting, most people were struck by [Beauregard’s] “foreign” appearance. His skin was smooth and olive-complexioned. His eyes, half-lidded, were dark, with a trace of Gallic melancholy about them.

His hair was black (though by 1860 he maintained this hue with dye). He was strikingly handsome and enjoyed the attentions of women, but probably not excessively or illicitly.
He sported a dark mustache and goatee, and he rather resembled Napoleon III, then ruler of France—although he often saw himself in the mold of the more celebrated Napoleon Bonaparte.

Place of death: New Orleans, Louisiana and was buried in the Tomb of the Army of Tennessee, Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans

City Park is a beautiful and well maintained urban park, the largest in the city and fifth largest municipal park in the United States and, at this writing, is reported to be one of the safest. In 1854, the first section of the park was acquired by the city. This tract of land, fronting on Bayou St. John and present City Park Ave., was part of the Allard Plantation. The first improvements to the park were made in the 1890’s. The park is laced with lagoons (the lagoons along City Park Ave. are part of old Bayou Metairie, seven miles of them which contain bass and bream), and trees typical of the region such as magnolias and live oaks
(the dueling oaks are named for the duels that were supposed to have taken place from 1804 to 1830).

The amusement park area has a fine old carousel dating from 1904. The Casino, dating from about 1914 is the center for information, rentals, and refreshments (coffee and beignets!) (domed band shell and Beaux Art style pavilion were built in the 30’s). The park has three 18-hole golf courses. Major restorations and all of the paving of roadways, construction of bridges, drainage and other improvements in a large area of the park were done under WPA in the late 30’s.

copy of the Pitot Housec. 1940
800 Moss Street
A modern Pitot House (see 1440 Moss Street) facsimile. One of the original Pitot House mantels still survives in the newer residence.

Louis Blanc Housec. 1798
924 Moss Street
Formerly the plantation and home Louis Antonio Blanc. The second story gallery has slender colonnettes and the French window, jalousies and steep roof are characteristic of
Louisiana colonial plantation houses; similar to Parlange and Homeplace Plantations elsewhere in the state.

Spanish Custom Housec. 1784
1300 Moss Street
A small-scale typical Louisiana Plantation hose. Various reasons have been given for the name of the so-called “Custom House” although there is no real tradition that it ever functioned in this manner. Probably built for Don Santiago Lloreins when the land formed part of his plantation.

Evariste Blanc House
(Holy Rosary Rectory)
c. 1834
1342 Moss Street
Some Greek Revival alterations have been made in this Bayou St. John plantation house, although evidence of an earlier style including slender colonnettes and round arched doors, is plainly visible.

Cabrini High School1964 – 1965
1400 Moss Street

Morel-Wisner House
c. 1850’s
1347 Moss Street
Mid-19th century, possibly constructed as a residence for the attorney Christoval Morel in the late 1840’s after he purchased a large tract of land on the Bayou St. John in 1847. The house served as New Orleans’ first Fencing Club in the 1880’s and one time as a rowing club. From
1935 until her death the house served as the home of Dr. Elizabeth Wisner, an original member of the faculty and later the dean of the School of Social Work at Tulane University.

Christoval Morel’s father, Pierre L. Morel dueled under the oaks in City Park while his wife (Victorine de Armas) was pregnant with Christoval. The Duelling Oaks in City Park have seen some of the most colorful scenes in New Orleans’ history. For years sword clanged against sword and bullets streaked between the ancient trees.

An article in the Times-Democrat, March 13, 1892, said, “Blood has been shed under the old cathedral aisles of nature. Between 1834 and 1844 scarcely a day passed without duels being fought at the Oaks. Why, it would not be strange if the very violets blossomed red of this soaked grass! The lover for his mistress, the gentleman for his honor, the courtier for his King; what loyalty has not cried out in pistol shot and scratch of steel! Sometimes two or three hundred people hurried from the city to witness these human baitings. On the occasion of one duel the spectators could stand no more, drew their swords, and there was a general melee.”

In early Creole days more duels were fought in New Orleans than any other American city. Creole honor was a thing of intricate delicacy, to be offended by a word or glance. The Duelling Oaks were a favorite setting for these affaires d’honneur, with pistol, saber, or colichemarde, a long sword with a broad forte and very slender foible, a favorite duelling weapon since the seventeenth century.

Creoles were expert swordsmen and often delighted in any and every opportunity to exhibit their art. Duels were fought over real and trivial insults, were sometimes deliberately
provoked by young men anxious to display their skill. A quarrel between rival lovers, a fancied slight, a political argument, a difference of opinion regarding an opera, any one of these things was ample excuse for a duel under the oaks. In his History of Louisiana, Alcee Fortier states that on one Sunday in 1839 ten duels were fought here.

In 1855 the police began to enforce the laws against duelling, but it continued surreptitiously for many years, despite frequent arrests and prosecutions. Finally, however, the law began to have some effect and there seems to have arisen a simultaneous loss of interest in the affairs. At last the time came when a man challenged to defend his honor with the sword or pistol, suffered no stigma by refusing an invitation to the Oaks. By 1890 duelling was only history.

The house is a frame one and a half story Greek Revival style structure raised off the ground on six-foot-high piles. The large half story created by the gabled roof is broken by two fine dormers on the Bayou St. John façade. The roof which extends outward to form a gallery across the bayou façade is supported by six square wooden columns resting on the brick piers below.

The entrance façade is five bays wide with the front door placed at the center. The façade is covered with ship-lap siding while ordinary weatherboards cover the solid brick exterior walls. The rear, which once contained a gallery and two cabinets, has been converted to a kitchen/den/breakfast area.

The house is very similar to raised houses in the Bayou-Lafourche area. However, by the 1840’s the traditional Creole plan with no hall had been replaced with the increasingly popular center hall plan favored by Americans. As such, this house is an important example of two different building styles. Morel house is a New Orleans landmark.

Pitot House
c. 1796 – 1799
1440 Moss Street (Formerly 1370 Moss Street) In 1964 as a result of a trade with Cabrini High School the Pitot House, threatened with demolition, was moved about 200 feet and is now located in a corner of the Desmare Playground. It is another fine Moss Street example of the Louisiana plantation house on a fairly small scale. While the upper part of the present structure is totally original, some of the older brick columns were either re-used or rebuilt after the move. Restored under the auspices of the Louisiana Landmarks Society. Open Thursday 11 am – 4 pm.

Musgrove-Wilkinson Housec. 1850’s
1454 Moss Street
A large, extremely simple Greek Revival residence, with wide central hall and plain interior mouldings.

New Orleans Museum of Art
1911 City Park
1971 Additions: Stern Auditorium, Wisner Educational Wing and City Wing – August Perez & Associates, Architects and Arthur Feitel, Consulting Architect.

The Degas House 
Historic Home,
Courtyard & Inn
 2306 Esplanade Avenue 
New Orleans, Louisiana 70119 
(504) 821-5009 
www.degashouse.com

jazzfestassholesWe love the folks who visit Faubourg St. John. However, there are some visitors who drink a bit too much and forget their manners. If you wouldn’t do it at your momma’s house, please don’t do it here.

For your safety, please consider checking out some of the information below:

Stash cash, credit cards and any currency.
Don’t make yourself vulnerable.
Work that cellphone.
Carry makeshift self defense weapons.
Identify safe places and people.

Please visit the link below for more:
http://www.axs.com/tips-to-stay-safe-at-new-orleans-jazz-heritage-festival-jazz-fest-safe-51357

Assume people driving cars do not see you. Drivers may be drunk, tired and sunburned; don’t expect that the drivers see the red light, let alone the periodic Jazz Fest reveler jumping out in the middle of the street.

Beware of bikers. A good rule of thumb is to treat a bike like a car. If you see one coming, don’t think you can run across the street right in front of it. Bikers will come upon you faster and be much slower at stopping than you think.

When walking from Jazz Fest to the location of your post-festing-party, remember that you may be traveling through potentially dangerous areas. Do not walk alone, know where you’re going and be aware of your surroundings.

Do not forget to hydrate! Dehydration can make people disoriented and alcohol adds fuel to the dehydration fire. I cannot count the number of Jazz Fest partiers I have seen take a spill due to too much alcohol and too little water. Don’t look like an amateur, drink lots of water!

More information in the link below:
http://www.morrisbart.com/pedestrian-safety-at-new-orleans-jazz-fest/

New Orleans weather is unpredictable and the Fair Grounds tend to be muddy, so bring lawn chairs, an umbrella, and garbage bags, which double as a raincoat and a dry place to sit. The Louisiana heat can be unforgiving, so pack your sunscreen and a hat too.

Do not forget toilet tissue, as you are sharing those port-o-potties with 400,000 others.

To avoid the heavy crowds, walk on the circular horse racing track around the perimeter of the Fair Grounds, and venture out to the grandstands for food demonstrations, art installations, shade and clean restrooms.

More information in the link below:
http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2012/02/13/new-orleans-jazz-fest-for-beginners/

Venture Beyond the Headliners
Absolutely Do Not Get Behind the Wheel
Come hungry
Linger in Mid-City
Indulge Intelligently
Don’t Miss NOLA by Night
Go for the Double

More information in the link below:
http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2015/04/7-survival-tips-new-orleans-jazz-heritage-festival.html

To ensure proper safety and preparation, please read the following rules and policies:

All persons and bags are subject to search

• Single, collapsible folding chairs (NO foot rests, side tables) and small folding
blankets are permitted.
• Wheelchairs permitted. Strollers for children permitted.
• NO FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY.
• NO tents or shades of any fashion.
• NO bicycles or other wheeled personal transport devices allowed on the
grounds or infield.
• NO flashing devices of any kind.
NO unauthorized vending.
• NO weapons, illicit drugs, contraband or fireworks.
• NO outside food, beverages or glass allowed.
• NO flag/kite-flying of any kind.
• NO Inflatables of any kind – this includes beach balls.
• NO pets.

Festival chairs and/or festival baggage are not allowed to be set-up anywhere in the
Grandstand, Paddock or Apron areas. They are only permitted on the Infield in certain areas.

All entrances and exits will be clearly marked for your safety.

fsj-bastille-2014Bayou St. John is the beautiful waterway that runs through Faubourg St. John.

We are so glad you are here.
Please leave no trace.

Bring yourself to the bayou.
Take your stuff home with you. ‪#‎leavenotrace‬

***

Below is short explanation of what the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is about:

The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association (FSJNA), organized in 1977, is a benevolent group interested in continuing improvements in this historic New Orleans neighborhood through its people, children, historic waterway, public spaces and other environs.

FSJNA has participated in numerous beautification efforts throughout Faubourg St. John from Parks and Playgrounds to simple street plantings. A few examples of this are Desmare Playground, rebuilt by FSJNA in the early 90’s and beautified with tree plantings in 2008, the maintenance and care of Fortier Park, the beautification of the median on Esplanade Avenue and plantings along Bayou St. John. FSJNA worked in conjunction with KABOOM to restore the children’s’ play area at Stallings Playground, which was negatively impacted by Hurricane Katrina. After playground equipment was installed, FSJNA obtained a loan to purchase additionally needed rubberized safety tiles for the area. FSJNA also continues to apply for grants to support these activities. Our Keep Louisiana Beautiful grant allowed us to obtain benches and garbage cans for local parks.

FSJNA works to keep its membership informed. The http://FSJNA.org website (available to anyone) is a library of the events, benefits, and programs FSJNA provides. Additionally fsjna.com is a resource for paid members (dues are $10 per year) this is a “yahoo group” website where members can exchange ideas, get neighborhood information, and even get hurricane updates.

During previous hurricanes, this site was a welcome source of information from people who stayed in the neighborhood to those who evacuated. It can be very reassuring to know the status of your home when you are away. The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is also represented on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.   Faubourg St. John is also at NEXTDOOR.com… http://faubourgstjohn.nextdoor.com

No one in the organization gets paid. The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association is an all volunteer organization where any donations or membership dues go directly back into making Faubourg St. John the best neighborhood in New Orleans.

While zoning matters can be contentious, they are a necessary function of an involved neighborhood organization. FSJNA has successfully negotiated and worked with most of the neighborhood businesses to protect the quality of life and increase the appeal of the area for those businesses and residents through limiting traffic and noise pollution, helping with the elimination of blight and providing safer streets.

FSJNA also works with and reaches out to other non-profits and bordering neighborhood organizations by participating in area festivals, cultural events, community workshops and informational seminars. Future work will continue to focus on building partnerships with local non-profits and community organizations to help retain the historic character and positive quality of life we enjoy.

Police Ask Public to Provide Pedal Power for Children

Posted in CRIME, Featured, HISTORY, Living Well, More Great Posts! with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2016 by katrinafilm

The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association, New Orleans Police Department and New Orleans Police & Justice Foundation donated 120 bicycles to pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students at ReNEW McDonogh City Park Academy. December 15, 2016.

***

by Linda Landesberg

1a2016bikegiveaway

Here is a great idea for your holiday gift purchasing:
The donation of a bicycle for a child in the name of a friend or loved one.

Forget about the Mall….without even leaving your house you can give a personalized gift certificate to someone on your holiday list saying that a bicycle for a child was donated in his/her name. Much better and easier than those random office gifts!

Please consider donating $50 for a bicycle for a child.

For the last three years the officers in our 1st District New Orleans Police Department have raised money to purchase bikes for needy pre-K, K and first graders in the district. I am writing in hopes that you can help this year; may I persuade you to “buy” one (or two) of these bikes for a donation of just $50 per bike?

1kidonbikestockphotoEvery positive interaction these kids have with a New Orleans police officer makes a positive difference, it is a great program, and your assistance will ensure that it continues.

This year the 1st District is working with McDonogh City Park Academy in the 2700 Block of Esplanade, Below is correspondence from Officer Gill and Commander Ganthier with more information about the program.

This is a charitable donation, checks should be made out to the “New Orleans Police & Justice Foundation” or “NOPJF”  with “First District Bike Givaway” in the note.  We will provide you with a receipt.

Donations are being collected thru December 12th.
Call Officer Gill (504) 385.7221 to pick up your check made out to the New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation with 1st District Bike Giveaway in the note section. If you need further information, you can also email Officer Gill at kgill@nola.gov

***
The note below is from Officer Kenny Gill

The First District is asking for donations of $50 to purchase bicycles for the Pre-K, Kindergarten and 1st grade students at McDonogh City Park Academy. Below an appeal from The 1st District Commander for these bicycles. Please forward and verbally tell others in your neighborhood, friends and members in your association.

This is going to be our 4th year giving bikes to school kids. A different school is chosen every year. This year we are going to be very ambitious. 169 bicycles are needed for children at McDonogh City Park Academy in the 2700 block of Esplanade. Most of the students at McDonogh City Park Academy are very needy (but not all).

Our School Resource Officer got a head count of the Pre-K, Kindergarten and First Graders; 169 students/bicycles. As you can see, the classes are pretty large but we would like to try to and accomplish this with your help.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call me.

Thanks,

Officer Kenneth Gill
504 385 7221

***
The note below is from N.O.P.D. 1st District Commander Hans Ganthier.
Click on the note below for a larger view in a PDF.

ganthierletter20162016donationletterforbicycles

2016bikegiveaway

Keeping Faubourg St. John Clean and Green

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Living Well with tags , , , , , , , , on November 29, 2016 by katrinafilm

Neighbors Making A Difference

<img src=”/images/cache/cache_5/cache_5/cache_b/Unknown-1-acafcb55.jpeg?ver=1480350990&aspectratio=1″ alt=””>

Robert Thompson is a neighborhood volunteer organizer. Thompson’s primary interest is in small public green spaces, an interest that many of his friends and neighbors share with the Faubourg St. John resident.

Through social media, Thompson helps to facilitate neighborhood projects by spreading the word about neighbor activities and interests, and encouraging people who live in the area to volunteer their help. Thompson also coordinates with NOLA Parks For All, a non-profit support organization that encourages neighbors to take care of their parks and green spaces. The organization often supplies neighborhood volunteers with trash bags and other needed materials as well as helpful tips and information on maintain safe and beautiful green spaces. For practical advice on how to maintain your neighborhood green spaces, contact NOLA Parks For All, or just pick up a rake to get started.

Listen to the podcast here.

Article above courtesy Craig Kraemer

Cynthia Sylvain-Lear, Director of City Sanitation, made sure all debris and trash from each of the clean ups was picked up promptly. Thank you!

oakbayouroad-before-after

capdevielle19nov2016a

busstopcreteesplanade-walkwaybeforeandafter

busstopcreteesplanade-plantings

A little garden in which to walk and immensity in which to dream

Posted in Featured, HISTORY, Living Well, More Great Posts! with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 7, 2016 by katrinafilm

by Robert Thompson

On Saturday, November 19, 2016,  neighbors turned out in numbers to make the City Beautiful Club’s Capdevielle Green and Clean Day a real success. Litter pickup, leaf raking, weeding and trimming, and gutter clean outs were just some things done.

An impressive project managed and executed by neighbor Pushpa has also resulted in planting the next installment of the Esplanade liriope border. Another great achievement was the conversion of the center bed “crater” into a presentable mound ready for a spring planting. 10 yards of soil, bales of pine straw, and 20-30 garbage bags were among things used that were purchased with donated funds from neighbors. Beverages and snacks were in part provided by our new neighborhood restaurant on Gentilly Blvd, TOAST It was the people power that made the real magic.

About 25-30 people came by and helped or supported the action in some way.  My joy was that the collection of individuals included folks from all walks of life, all age groups, and all economic classes. It is important to note participation by staff and residents of our neighbors at Odyssey House.   Sharing a love of the public space as a commonality was especially uplifting.   NOLA Parks for All had a couple of board members down in the dirt with us as part of their support and encouragement of our grass root efforts.

I wish I could enumerate all and thank them here but I would miss some simply because I wasn’t organized enough to document who came and went. I have a few photos which tell the story better and urge you to check them out in the link below:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/CityBeautifulClubs/photos/?tab=album&album_id=934998696632213

On the horizon – can we reach a consensus on what the important center circle bed should be?
Can we convince Park and Parkways to let us do it?

Stay tuned…

Robert Thompson
2653 DeSoto

Here’s a shot of the flurry of activity from young and old as Pushpa harnesses the raw power of our volunteers!

Here’s a shot of the flurry of activity from young and old as Pushpa harnesses the raw power of our volunteers!

Rickie Lee Jones was working with other Faubourg St. John neighbors to help beautify the neighborhood on Saturday, November 19, 2016. In the video above, learn why she lives in New Orleans.
***

backhoe-city-capdevielle-2016oct18

On October 18, 2016, Capdevielle Park received attention from the crews at Parks & Parkways. Diseased trees were removed, others trimmed and thanks to a large backhoe, a large step toward rehabbing the center mound for new plantings took place.

mound-capdevielle-2016oct18All this support from the City means we need to double down on our commitment to restore the central circular bed in Capdevielle Park. On Saturday, November 19th, please bring shovels and rakes, gloves, and muscles so that we can clean up the soil and prepare this bed for greater things to come.

Friends,

Headed toward our second Capdevielle Place (or Park) improvement action. Your help in the past has qualified you to receive more begging appeals from me!
Lucky!
Seriously, I and others have appreciated the commitments you have made to improve our little neglected park at Crete and Esplanade. I think we are slowly making a difference and are on the way to a much improved public space, one we can proudly claim for our special community.
At the moment we only have a couple of hundred dollars collected. I would like to continue plantings on the periphery begun by Pushpa last meet. Additionally, we have a special gift from Tammany Baumgarten (http://www.baumgardens.com/) of a garden plan for the bed closest to N Broad. More dollars will mean more plants to execute these goals. Large donors seeking tax deduction should contact NOLA Parks For All (a 501c3 http://www.nolaparksforall.org/contact-us.html) who is partnering with us at this time to support citizen actions related to park improvements.
The bulk of the work however is good ole fashioned labor. Litter removal, gutter cleaning, trimming and weeding, bed preparations – all driven by personpower. I have stockpiled pine straw for bed dressing. So please distribute this information in the notice below to interested parties, and respond if you can think auxiliary activities, provide refreshments or have appropriate plant material to donate.
Hope to see you that Saturday, Nov 19 (10a-2p).
Thanks
Robert Thompson
2653 DeSoto
504 292-1065
capdevielle19nov

***

Paul Capdevielle (1842-1922)


Paul Capdevielle, the forty-second Mayor was of French descent. He was born in New Orleans, January 15, 1842. His father, Augustin Capdevielle, was born in France, but settled in New Orleans in 1825, becoming a prominent merchant in the commission business and active in politics. It was from his father’s interest in politics that young Paul inherited his interest in governmental affairs. His mother, Virginia Bertrand, was born in New Orleans in 1816.Paul Capdevielle was educated at the Jesuit’s College in New Orleans from which he was graduated in 1861. He served with credit in the War between the States, enlisting in the New Orleans Guard Regiment of Infantry, but in 1862 joined Boone’s Louisiana Artillery, and was wounded at Port Hudson.

After the close of the war he returned to civil life, taking up the first employment that offered itself, studied law in April 1868 was graduated from Louisiana State University. In 1892, he gave up law to accept the presidency of the Merchant’s Insurance Company. He served as its President for sixteen years, until it was liquidated and sold.

His political history began in 1877 when he was appointed to the School Board. Later he was a member of the Orleans Levee Board, a Commissioner of Prisons and Asylums and Chairman of the Finance Committee of the drainage commission. Mr. Capdevielle was an outstanding figure in Louisiana politics from the time of his election as Mayor of New Orleans in 1899. He was appointed auditor of Public Accounts in 1904, and re-elected three times, and held this office up to the time of his death. He survived the political storms attending the fall of the state administrations, the last in 1920, when Governor Parker was swept into office.

The Flower administration was a turning point in the history of New Orleans. It closed one epoch and opened another. With it began the period of commercial prosperity which extends into the present time.

Mayor Capdevielle’s administration was noted for two events, both inseparably connected with the beginning of New Orleans’ industrial development; the installation of the modern sewerage system and the organization of the Public Belt Railroad. The Board of Port Commissioners also began to function actively during this period.

City Park stands as a monument to his energy and civic spirit. The upbuilding of the park was his constant care, and he served continuously as President of the City Park Improvement Association for more than two decades, holding the office at the time of his death.

The new administration went into office May 9, 1900, at the beginning of the twentieth century when a wave of prosperity passed over the country and was felt in New Orleans. Mayor Capdevielle in his inaugural address spoke of the drainage system about to be constructed and stated if the city desired to have its own electric light plant it could do so without great additional cost by using the power house of the drainage system.

The contract to erect a modern jail, to be called the House of Detention, was awarded for $112,800 and the site of the old Marine Hospital, on Tulane Avenue and Broad Street, was selected.

The Clay statue, being in the way of safe operations of the street cars, was removed from Canal Street to the Lafayette Square on January 12, 1901. The consolidation of various street railways into one corporation under the name of the New Orleans Railways Company was an important factor of the years 1901-1902.

On May 1, 1901, New Orleans was honored by the visit of the President of the United States, William McKinley, accompanied by Mrs. McKinley and Secretaries John Hay, Charles Emory Smith, and E. A. Hitchcock. He was received in the Cabildo by the Governor of Louisiana, attended by his staff in full uniform. The bells of the Cathedral of St. Louis announced the arrival of the President and his cabinet, escorted by Mayor Paul Capdevielle, and a committee of distinguished citizens. As the cortege entered the Supreme Court Hall, Chairman Zacharie announced in a loud voice “The President,” and the assembly arose and remained standing while the Chief Justice conducted the President to a seat of honor at his right on the Supreme Court Bench. The Governor of Louisiana took a seat on the left of the Chief Justice, and the Mayor of New Orleans the one on the right of the President, the Justices occupying seats immediately in the rear of the bench. Chairman Zacharie then conducted the members of the cabinet and their wives to places on the left of the dais, where a seat, filled with roses, had been reserved for Mrs. William McKinley, who, at the last moment, was too ill to attend.

In 1873, Paul Capdevielle married in New Orleans, Miss Emma Larue, who died several years ago. Three sons and two daughters blessed this union; the sons are Christian, Auguste and Paul, Jr., and the daughters are the Misses Edith and Yvonne Capdevielle.

Paul Capdevielle was found dead at his home in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, August 13, 1922.

Robert Thompson Proposes Plan for Capdeville Park

Posted in Featured, Living Well, More Great Posts! with tags , , , , , , , on September 21, 2016 by katrinafilm

by Robert Thompson

capdeville5It’s been a long hot summer since our last get together at Capdeville Park. The progress begun at that Clean-up day has begun to give the park that “cared for” look which in turn lifts our neighborhood, discourages further littering and vandalism, and may even make our area safer.

During the summer, I sought some help from professionals who can guide us in our next phase of park uplifting – no sense spending our small resources of time and money on anything that doesn’t have the best long term success rates. A good plants person can steer us toward appropriate choices in selecting items for our park beds.

I approached Greater New Orleans Master Gardeners program looking for assistance. Their group consists of persons who completed training from a LSU Agcenter outreach program and who give some of their time in community service. I haven’t yet found a Master from the area willing to take this project on, but a very valuable contact was made through this connection. Tammany Baumgarten, a professional horticulturist from BaumGardens Landscape & Design, is a major resource for Master Gardeners, and in response to my begging she graciously provided me with a plan and a strategy for the planted beds in the park.

Below is her drawing, which I am also sending to our friend Tica H. at Parkways, for your comments (and Parkways approval). The price tag for the venture, if fully planted straight away would be about $1700 in materials. Labor was assessed at $1400. Of course we are a volunteer effort, and some plant materials and supplies may be scrounged, and much of the labor should be our own sweat equity.

A November time frame is being targeted for our next volunteer effort. Bed clean-up and prep, some planting and landscaping – this will be determined by our practical limitations and what we can raise in funds. I am also working to find us an organization to be a part of where fundraising can include business solicitations and grants. But for the moment the burden is on us.

Please review the plan below. If you are able to commit to a donation toward its achievement, please contact me at the info below.

Thanks neighbor for caring about our community and beautifying New Orleans!

Robert Thompson
2653 DeSoto
(504) 292-1065

capdeville-plan

 

*******************************************************************************

Neighbors got together in 2012 to help make some improvements in Capdeville Park.
Robert Thompson would like to once again add some plant life in Capdeville Park.

Thanks to 8 neighbors that spent time in 2012 to divide and plant 48 gallon sized Monkey Grass, yellow lantana and purple duranta (to bring in butterflies), and ardesia crenata (Christmas berry, a shade lover).

photo below by David Armond

photos below by Brenda London
We mulched, amended soil, divided Paper Whites to replant this fall, and trimmed 5 Natchez Crape Mytles that we planted maybe a dozen years ago. $500 went quickly from 5 trips to 3 Home Depots!

Unfortunately 10 bags of soil and 6 bags of mulch disappeared into a white pickup. I had too many loads of stuff to manage in a Subaru and left it out at the park the nite before, gone at 6:30 am. I vented my disgust by hoeing weeds vigorously! Neighbors report frequent plant thefts near Broad. We replaced what we really needed, and will wait to augment soil in another phase.

So thanks to people from all over our neighborhood who worked, found their garden Zen, and had a good time:


Steve Mardon
Brenda London (Grand Rte St John)
Deena Bedigan (Delgado-she did a perfect job separating monkey grass)
Danny Akers (worked and treated us to fresh squeezed lemonade) also involved with Café Amelie on Royal, (Crete St)
Helen Ball (rode her bike from St John’s Court)
David Armond- N Lopez
Katy Smith (new young neighbor from Jackson) Bell St

The soaking rain this weekend insures that this project is off to a great start. We have promises from Andy Romero, David Lapene and Danny Akers to keep the new plantings watered thru the summer. We can always use extras…

Future needs include a streetlight (way to dark here),repair some crumbling interior sidewalk, sprinkler system, a creative welcome to FSJ sign, sculpture. These are LONG term dreams. Very open to input and help make the connections. I do better with my hands in the dirt!!

I will be asking Parks and Parkways to remove a phoenix palm growing at the base of an oak.

Love this neighborhood!
Bobby

capdeville5

FOOT RACE AND FESTIVAL SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 24th

Posted in Featured, Living Well with tags , , , , , , , , on September 19, 2016 by katrinafilm

STREETS WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE FOOT RACE


streetsclosed2016sept24

Contributions go toward Steve Gleason’s participation in advanced and experimental technology, equipment and treatments.

gleasonfamilyThe purpose of the What you Give will Grow event is to raise awareness for ALS and to support the Gleason Family Trust. The Gleason Family Trust is set up to help offset the incremental costs of living with ALS.

Team Gleason is an organization driven to generate public awareness for Amyothrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), raise funding to empower those with ALS to live a rewarding life, and ultimately find a cure for ALS.
The Gleason Initiative Foundation – a 501c3 working to help others with ALS.

Gleason Family Trust – for those wanting to directly support Steve and his family
www.TeamGleason.org

Ticket & Registration Information

Race – 9:30 am 
5K Run (3.7 miles)

Entry Fees:
$37 – First 737 Race Registrants
$45 – 738+ Race Registrants through September 23rd
Registration is available at packet pick up locations for $45
$55 – Race Day Registration – September 24th – 7:30am – 9:00am (limited)
$20 – youth (15 & under)

Race entry includes limited edition Team Gleason T-shirt, one general admission ticket to Gleason Gras with post run refreshments.

FESTIVAL – Until 8 pm
General Admission Tickets:
$5 – in advance; $10 – at the gate

VIP Tickets: (Limited Tickets)
$250 – purchased by September 23rd; $300 – at the gate
$50 – Youth (15 & under)
Enjoy VIP at Gleason Gras – Open Premium Bar, Live and Silent Auction, Door Prize – Autographed Steve Gleason and Thomas Morstead Jerseys, Private Restrooms, VIP Gourmet Food by New Orleans’ Finest Restaurants and Much More!  VIP ticket includes race registration.

Saturday, September 24th

Team Gleason House at St. Margaret’s
3525 Bienville Street in Mid-City – New Orleans

9:30 AM – 3.7 MILE RACE – 5K Race

FESTIVAL TO FOLLOW
Live Music, Food & Fun for the Family in Mid-City

9:30am – Race Starts
10:30am – Bag of Donuts
12:00pm – John Michael
1:00pm – Alexis and Samurai
2:15pm – Paul Varisco and the Milestones
3:45pm – 610 Stompers
4:15 pm – Hot 8 Brass Band
5:55pm – Tre G with Supa Saint
6:30pm – Bonerama